New Grad Interview Protocol?

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    I just had an interview this morning, and I'm wondering how to give the nurse manager a thank you card? Should I have had a thank you card at the ready before the interview? She also didn't give me a business card so I could mail it (she did give me her number if I had any more questions).

    I also don't know how my interview went -- I was nervous at the beginning (I went through the trouble of thinking about my strengths and weaknesses last night, and couldn't remember my weaknesses without sounding like a dummy), but I calmed down as the interview went forward. She showed me the unit, and she said she had another interview on Monday before she would make any decision.

    Regardless of how I felt about this morning, how do I send a thank you card? By the way, whenever I think about the interview, I think, "Yeaaah, I'm worried."
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

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    I would assume you have the mailing address of the facility itself? So.....address the card to the hospital, with the attention line: "Ms. Mary Doe, Nurse Manager" and be sure to write "confidential" on there as well. Don't need the mail clerk opening it for her!

    Not sure what you mean by having a thank you card "at the ready" for future interviews? Certainly, you aren't intending to hand it over at the end of the interview...?
  5. 0
    Quote from RNsRWe
    I would assume you have the mailing address of the facility itself? So.....address the card to the hospital, with the attention line: "Ms. Mary Doe, Nurse Manager" and be sure to write "confidential" on there as well. Don't need the mail clerk opening it for her!

    Not sure what you mean by having a thank you card "at the ready" for future interviews? Certainly, you aren't intending to hand it over at the end of the interview...?
    I've seen some people do that -- they have the card with them to give to the interviewer, but that always struck me as odd so I never followed that observation, plus it seemed, er, well, tacky.
  6. 0
    You could always hand deliver it to the HR office
  7. 0
    Quote from rumwynnieRN
    I've seen some people do that -- they have the card with them to give to the interviewer, but that always struck me as odd so I never followed that observation, plus it seemed, er, well, tacky.
    Handing over a thank you card upon conclusion of the interview isn't accomplishing what the card is SUPPOSED to do: tell the interviewer that after you left, upon reflection of the appointment, you decided to take the time to thank that person for their effort. You want the person to feel that you have recognized the accommodation in their schedule, planning for review of credentials/resume, etc....and all this should be after time for consideration. It's personal because now you've met that hiring manager, and are recognizing her/him. Handing over a pre-written card is tantamount to saying "I don't want to bother with all this later, here's your stupid requirement I'm supposed to do". And all before even MEETING the manager.

    Know what I mean?
  8. 0
    A couple of things regarding thank you cards:

    It's your final attempt to get the nurse manager's attention. If you've pre-made the card before hand, you are eliminating the chance of highlight what you've discussed or add on to those questions you feel you've answered poorly.

    It's not a one-thank-you-card-fits-all. Make sure to highlight what s/he said, like... "I appreciate how you explained the hiring process and the changes the hospital is currently going..." or "I've read the mission and vision of the hospital prior to the interview and having had the opportunity to talk with you, I have a clearer view of what you're looking for... and I believe I have the qualities of a nurse that will be a great addition to your team."

    Type it out on a resume paper and mail it. Don't assume your handwriting is readable. You have 24-hours to mail it. It's always nice to mail it the same day of your interview.
  9. 0
    Quote from Nurse_
    A couple of things regarding thank you cards:

    It's your final attempt to get the nurse manager's attention. If you've pre-made the card before hand, you are eliminating the chance of highlight what you've discussed or add on to those questions you feel you've answered poorly.

    It's not a one-thank-you-card-fits-all. Make sure to highlight what s/he said, like... "I appreciate how you explained the hiring process and the changes the hospital is currently going..." or "I've read the mission and vision of the hospital prior to the interview and having had the opportunity to talk with you, I have a clearer view of what you're looking for... and I believe I have the qualities of a nurse that will be a great addition to your team."

    Type it out on a resume paper and mail it. Don't assume your handwriting is readable. You have 24-hours to mail it. It's always nice to mail it the same day of your interview.
    Thank you. I wish I had known that before -- I'm fairly certain I didn't get the position (or well, I'm trying not to get too overly excited or have my hopes up). If I can land another interview, I know for next time .
  10. 0
    Quote from Nurse_
    A couple of things regarding thank you cards:

    It's your final attempt to get the nurse manager's attention. If you've pre-made the card before hand, you are eliminating the chance of highlight what you've discussed or add on to those questions you feel you've answered poorly.

    It's not a one-thank-you-card-fits-all. Make sure to highlight what s/he said, like... "I appreciate how you explained the hiring process and the changes the hospital is currently going..." or "I've read the mission and vision of the hospital prior to the interview and having had the opportunity to talk with you, I have a clearer view of what you're looking for... and I believe I have the qualities of a nurse that will be a great addition to your team."

    Type it out on a resume paper and mail it. Don't assume your handwriting is readable. You have 24-hours to mail it. It's always nice to mail it the same day of your interview.
    I did a slight variation to this. I left the interview and drove straight to the post office and wrote a short thank you to each person. Then the next day I sent an email much like what you stated above and closed the email with, "I would like to assure you of my genuine interest in joining your home health team". I received a positive email back. Hoping this is the one!


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