Want a BSN in Philippines - pg.3 | allnurses

Want a BSN in Philippines - page 4

Hi, all: I'm in a bit of dilemma. I'm a U.S. citizen aspiring to be a nurse here in the States, but I think I've finally hit my dead end. The original plan was to accomplish an Associates Degree... Read More

  1. Visit  kathyjamero profile page
    0
    Try Cebu Doctor's University in Cebu, Philippines. I am a Bachelor Degree holder from CA and its only 3yrs for me. Tuition is much cheaper compared to CA. If your not a dual citizen status, than expect to pay double of the tuition. I hope that helps and best of luck! I refuse to be in student loan debt!
    Last edit by kathyjamero on Oct 21, '11 : Reason: revising
  2. Visit  kathyjamero profile page
    0
    Quote from iscream4u
    Hey, maxmus. I think I'm planning to study schools in the visayas area. So when is your target date to study in Manila? And you're a 2ndcourser, yes? I've heard (but I could be wrong) Philippines have done away with 2nd courser programs, and all will have to start back from scratch (btw, can any expert confirm if this is correct?). I really hope I'm wrong, as I don't want to have to repeat all of the classes I've taken. Most of my friends there did suggest that whatever school I plan to go, should be more than willing to credit the subjects I've taken considering it's from an American college.

    So what about you? What's the status of your evaluation? Did your target schools give you credit for classes you've taken in Canada?

    Btw, if you are going by this route, too, I'd assume it's pretty competitive, complicated, and difficult to get into nursing schools there? How are things in Canada, as far as applying to nursing schools, employment for nurses, and employment of foreign-trained nurses?

    Just to update, 2nd courser NO longer exist in the Philppines or accepted by the Board of Nursing in CA.
  3. Visit  FLnurse11 profile page
    0
    Quote from iscream4u
    hi, all:

    i'm in a bit of dilemma. i'm a u.s. citizen aspiring to be a nurse here in the states, but i think i've finally hit my dead end. the original plan was to accomplish an associates degree in nursing in a local community college -- cheaper and faster. my pre-reqs are all finished. all i need is entrance to an adn program. in terms of transoportation i can only commute to a certain distance from home, as i won't have any means to transport myself. so that limits me to a few schools within the area. unfortunately, two of those schools deem my science pre-reqs gpa too low , and this other school that i've applied to for three semesters (to no avail) is ridiculously impacted . i've thought about doing the lvn route but i can barely get a class now, as i've already maxed out my welcome at community college (i have two associate degrees). in addition, i'm not qualified for aid anymore, as there's a limit of units taken... obviously i've maxed out obtaining my two associates plus my rn pre requisites.

    i've thought about going to private schools... but they're just too expensive and their credits don't seem to transfer over to alot of schools. i looked up an lvn program from this one private school and it cost around $30,000 ! seriously?! an lvn program for 30k doesn't sound like it's worth it. and with the current state that the u.s. is in (us fresh rn grads having difficult time finding a job), i think i'd become very anxious with a debt like that without even a guarantee of employment. then i checked the bsn programs here, and i checked out. i can't afford that. and it would take me a very long time.

    here i am, so discouraged and wondering if i've just wasted my time schooling just to hit a freakin' wall . one of my science pre-reqs is in danger of reaching its 5-year recency (which most community colleges' limit). i can't support myself yet. i do want to become a nurse, but it's so challenging and competitve. i don't want to think that i endured those science classes for nothing. i'd like to see them be of use. so now i've come to the conclusions that i should get my bsn in nursing in the philippines.

    now i've been reading alot on this topic and read what the naysayers have said (cons). but perhaps things are different now in the philippines (?). i'm a bit aware of the retrogression issue, though i'm not sure how this would apply to me being a u.s. citizen. the education is cheaper and there are good schools out there. i just really want that bsn! are there any u.s. citizens out there who took this option? if so, what can you tell me about the experience?

    here are my questions:
    1. would it be better for me to obtain student visa or dual-citizenship?
    2. are there any negative effects with having a dual citizenship?
    3. considering my two associates degrees, will all the classes i've taken be credited, thus making my class load lighter (or i can finish bsn in 2-3 years)?
    4. if i took the dual citizenship route, will i still be required to take the boards in philippines, even if i intend to work in the sates?
    5. with just a student visa, will my tuition rate be more expensive than the locals'?
    6. will having an msn in philippines make a significant impact when one wants to work in the states?
    7. to u.s. citizens, did they have to make you attend relgious studies, cat/rotc classes in philippines?
    8. which rn schools should i stay away from? and which are reputable by american standards?

    i'm desperate, y'all. please give me some helpful answers. thanks.
    sorry for reading this post too late.
    i was denied direct admission to an adn course in a local community college and was instead placed on a waiting list despite my excellent grades in my previous bs in the philippines. what i did was to go home in the philippines and study instead bsn. it took me just 2 years to study since i have a previous bs already. after graduation, i went back home to the us and took the nclex and passed it. simple as that. now i am gainfully employed as an icu nurse. while my friends who attended the community college still has to ladderize to bsn because they had adn. florida now requires bsn grads only.

    since you're an american citizen, all you have to do is is pay a student visa approximately $500. i paid my school and they took care of it. when i missed classes because i have to go back to the usa, my school always had remedial classes. classes are from mondays to sundays depending on the sched, but the rest are just remedial classes. they are very strict though with attendance being a reputable school.
  4. Visit  Seasoned profile page
    0
    Quote from iscream4u
    hi, all:

    i'm in a bit of dilemma. i'm a u.s. citizen aspiring to be a nurse here in the states, but i think i've finally hit my dead end. the original plan was to accomplish an associates degree in nursing in a local community college -- cheaper and faster. my pre-reqs are all finished. all i need is entrance to an adn program. in terms of transoportation i can only commute to a certain distance from home, as i won't have any means to transport myself. so that limits me to a few schools within the area. unfortunately, two of those schools deem my science pre-reqs gpa too low , and this other school that i've applied to for three semesters (to no avail) is ridiculously impacted . i've thought about doing the lvn route but i can barely get a class now, as i've already maxed out my welcome at community college (i have two associate degrees). in addition, i'm not qualified for aid anymore, as there's a limit of units taken... obviously i've maxed out obtaining my two associates plus my rn pre requisites.

    i've thought about going to private schools... but they're just too expensive and their credits don't seem to transfer over to alot of schools. i looked up an lvn program from this one private school and it cost around $30,000 ! seriously?! an lvn program for 30k doesn't sound like it's worth it. and with the current state that the u.s. is in (us fresh rn grads having difficult time finding a job), i think i'd become very anxious with a debt like that without even a guarantee of employment. then i checked the bsn programs here, and i checked out. i can't afford that. and it would take me a very long time.

    here i am, so discouraged and wondering if i've just wasted my time schooling just to hit a freakin' wall . one of my science pre-reqs is in danger of reaching its 5-year recency (which most community colleges' limit). i can't support myself yet. i do want to become a nurse, but it's so challenging and competitve. i don't want to think that i endured those science classes for nothing. i'd like to see them be of use. so now i've come to the conclusions that i should get my bsn in nursing in the philippines.

    now i've been reading alot on this topic and read what the naysayers have said (cons). but perhaps things are different now in the philippines (?). i'm a bit aware of the retrogression issue, though i'm not sure how this would apply to me being a u.s. citizen. the education is cheaper and there are good schools out there. i just really want that bsn! are there any u.s. citizens out there who took this option? if so, what can you tell me about the experience?

    here are my questions:
    1. would it be better for me to obtain student visa or dual-citizenship?
    2. are there any negative effects with having a dual citizenship?
    3. considering my two associates degrees, will all the classes i've taken be credited, thus making my class load lighter (or i can finish bsn in 2-3 years)?
    4. if i took the dual citizenship route, will i still be required to take the boards in philippines, even if i intend to work in the sates?
    5. with just a student visa, will my tuition rate be more expensive than the locals'?
    6. will having an msn in philippines make a significant impact when one wants to work in the states?
    7. to u.s. citizens, did they have to make you attend relgious studies, cat/rotc classes in philippines?
    8. which rn schools should i stay away from? and which are reputable by american standards?

    i'm desperate, y'all. please give me some helpful answers. thanks.


    wait!!!! hold everything!!!
    how sad is it that with our nursng shortage any usa citizen believes she / he has to leave the country to become a much needed nurse in the usa!!!!

    the time, money, and effort you are using to come in the back door (foreign country educated) to a usa bsn should be spent in coming in the front door and you will be successful! i read about your struggles and it speaks well of your dedication. it was your personal strategies that failed you not the usa system. yes the us system does stink!please consider these strategies before you waste your time, efforts, and money in that huge plan to leave the usa with such a poor gamble for success.

    1. why not join the usa military for a free rn education, free ticket to esplore the world, and a guarnatee of employment before, during and after rn training and passing the boards! (air force is best). what ever it takes meet that requiremennt for admission!
    2. apply for goverment grants (there are tons) verses any financial aid and a fat years of payback loan money.
    3. why the philipines? are you asian and feel exceptionally ready to be subjected to the environmental culture adaptation. you might find you love it there and easier just to stay a nurse there for years because of the hassel to transfer credit and license to the usa. that would be truely sad for the us to lose you.
    4. if you still feel you have to go, at least be smart about it. get the advice of many native phillipine nurses who work here in the usa (i believe they have association)... there are tons of them - versus talking with anyone trying to do what you want to do. the reason there was usa nurse recruitment from the philipines year ago was because of our nursing shortage here in the usa. find them!! take the common denominator advice they have to offer.
    5. send your initial comment of this thread in the obama website (barackobama.com) under a subject title like: " why do i have to go to a foreign country to get a bsn in this my native country!!" to my surprise there are responses that have been successful to get successful attention (on other issues) for so many people. you do not have to like the president for have voted for him! also this is an election year there is special attention and monitor of citzen issues.
    6. the american nurses association chose obama as the first president they have publically endosed. send that same email to the amercan nurses association!

    don't spend your wheels with goals of "fast and cheapest" and be n the same boat 3 years from now, i.e., still not a bsn nurse in the usa!
    i wish the best of god's blessng (and luck) to you!!
  5. Visit  steppybay profile page
    0
    Wow, have the tides has changed now in a short period of time! I hope some of the earlier posters know that getting their BSN degree from PH is now completely worthless and a waste of their time and money if they plan to ever work in CA.

    It's not at all recognized by the CA BON in 99.50% of the cases and without having to re-take near impossible courses in CA, due to the fact that the CHED and PRC have not changed their methods of running their schools at all to meet the CA minimums (the concurrency issues or the lack of certain clinical hours in certain courses).

    Getting an out of state RN license once they come back, it cannot be endorsed back into CA. They should just come back and go to the CA schools offering LVN classes and complete it and probably will pass the NCLEX in the first time. As we know that the NCLEX passing rate from PH schools are dismally very low compared to CA's 80% or higher rates.

    I hope they get word of these terrible problems facing recent PH grads.
  6. Visit  ok123 profile page
    0
    Hi!
    I'm currently working as an LPN in america and want to continue with BSN in the philippines. Do you think how many years to finished the course, do they consider my subjects in LPN in the philippines? Do I have to attend clinical although I'm already working here as an LPN...I graduated BS commerce -accounting major in the philippines. Do I Consider My Self As Foreign Students bec. I'm a US citizen. I need some advice and somebody to guide me. What is the best school to enroll. .
  7. Visit  Turbota profile page
    0
    ok123 ....

    Good questions, unfortunately I don't have your answers.

    My Filipina wife is in somewhat of the same situation as you are in, however, she has never been a nurse of any type before.

    My wife is also a US citizen and has a BS degree in Computer Science from a school in the Philippines. We both live together here in Florida.

    She wants to attend De La Salle university in Bacolod City and try to get her BSN. Then come back to Florida and try passing the NCLEX-RN.

    I hope we can both get someone here to help answer the questions we both have.

    Ron and Ann,


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