Observations on Filipinos abroad! - page 4

I've been to the US several times as a tourist and have observed some noticeable things about my fellow countrymen. 1. We now realized the difference between the red, amber, and green lights. ... Read More

  1. by   doki
    Hey even if Filipinos do forgot to speak their native tongue, all I can say is that they always remember their families bdays & special holidays, strong family bonds indeed
  2. by   doki
    Quote from jrhyle
    not sure if you already got the answer to this question. but sometime ago i was reading through suzanne's (moderator) answers about the rumors being circulated on this forum, she was enlightening some issues and i remember her also mentioning " no need to pass the local board to take the nclex ". something to that effect. not exactly her own words. it's just somewhere around here if you have enough time, you can look around ...... hope this helps.
    i'm also planning and have been scheduled to take the nclex and i'm not a local board passer so i guess not needed :wink2: lucky you, you already have a tourist visa. is it hard to get one? i'm still preparing for my visa application or else i gotta go to hongkong for the exam
  3. by   jonRNMD
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Are there any Filipino food/fruit that we cannot find in the US?

    calamansi (philippine lemon) and "balut" are not available here in NY. not sure if it is available in the west coast......

    to my surprise, "isaw" and "chicharon bulaklak" are available here.....my uncle cooks great tasting "sisig" by the way
  4. by   jonRNMD
    Quote from maddy16
    hi there.Maddy here,i just want to ask question regarding the procedure on taking up nclex.I will be graduating this coming October my classmates and I decided not to take the local board exam(as what have you heard about the scam)We all have our us visa(tourist).Is it a requirement for nclex to pass the local board here in our country?
    Pls help us thank you and God Bless
    no offense but can we please stick to the thread topic.....

    thanks
  5. by   Rep
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Are there any Filipino food/fruit that we cannot find in the US?
    If you are living in a place where there a lots of Filipinos, you can almost find all of the foods we eat in the Philippines. Except the "calamansi," which my wife substitutes it with lemon but "calamansi" taste better. You can find dilis ( dried anchovies), galunggong, tilapia, bangus and other Philippine fish. Vegetables, well, saluyut, alugbati, malunggay, just name it.

    In my opinion, here in California, we eat the same food that we eat in the Philippines except here we eat in abundance because the foods, even Philippine foods, are much cheaper and affordable compare to in our country.

    You buy one whole chicken and it costs around 10 minutes of your work while in the Philippines, it will costs around 50% of your daily minimum wage.
  6. by   kalayaan
    filipinos who grew up in the philippines have not forgotten to speak filipino. its passing the language on to their kids that they have forgotten. thats my pet peeve. in my family we have made it a point that the kids have to learn how to speak filipino. besides, knowing more languages develops ones mind.

    gracediwa, calamansi is available in the west coast. you can see houses here with trees of calamansi. they have mexican mangoes here, which pales in comparison with pinoy mangoes. 15 years ago my lola brought lanzones, she stuffed them in shoes. but that was 15 years ago.

    also, i would love to eat in a decent filipino resto. omg, they all look like canteens here. to think that the phil has the best restos in the world!
  7. by   koala_bear
    Try using key limes as substitute for Kalamansi. Its as close as it gets
  8. by   lavalin
    Do they have BAEG in the West Coast?

    BAEG ya SINAGSAGAN na INASIN also known as alokon or himbabao in Ilocano. It is rich in vitamins A, B and C, and contains calcium, phosphorus, potassium and iron.

    It is mixed in the Ilocano dish inabrao, or a vegetable stew of tomatoes, sitaw (string beans) and patani (fresh lima beans), flavored by pieces of grilled pork. In Pangasinan it is called bag, with the requisite Pangasinan guttural e that all Filipinos outside of the province find so hard to pronounce (it is like the e in brother, or the second e in eagle - easy, right?).

    In Pangasinan it is most commonly cooked with pakbet, a mix of okra, eggplants, tomatoes, palya (ampalaya, bitter gourd/melon), all put together in a boiling pot of singsagn and agt (luya, ginger).

  9. by   Rep
    I can't stand it anymore! I am hungry now.


    Quote from lavalin
    Do they have BAEG in the West Coast?

    BAEG ya SINAGSAGAN na INASIN also known as alokon or himbabao in Ilocano. It is rich in vitamins A, B and C, and contains calcium, phosphorus, potassium and iron.

    It is mixed in the Ilocano dish inabrao, or a vegetable stew of tomatoes, sitaw (string beans) and patani (fresh lima beans), flavored by pieces of grilled pork. In Pangasinan it is called bag, with the requisite Pangasinan guttural e that all Filipinos outside of the province find so hard to pronounce (it is like the e in brother, or the second e in eagle - easy, right?).

    In Pangasinan it is most commonly cooked with pakbet, a mix of okra, eggplants, tomatoes, palya (ampalaya, bitter gourd/melon), all put together in a boiling pot of singsagn and agt (luya, ginger).

  10. by   lavalin
    Sometimes happiness is as simple as being able to buy a handful of bag (about 50 grams at Php10) to put in a pot of pakbet (pinakbet), or mix in a stew of balatng (munggo, mung beans) sauteed with chopped, ripe tomatoes.

    It becomes a joy, really, because the tree, or more appropriately the woody, high-growing shrub, bears only seasonally these light-green, textured, long spindly flowers that turn into a vegetable for us Northerners (Ilocanos and Pangasinenses).

    :spin:
  11. by   Rep
    My children were all borned in the Philippines and we talk to them in Filipino although my wife and I speak with our own regional dialect (Chavacano). Our purpose is that once they go back to the Philippines, they can easily converse with any Filipino and also that we value our roots. My two older children are going to school here and and day by day their English is improving. But once at home, its Chavacano and Filipino except during study time then we use English for them to better understand the lessons.

    Quote from kalayaan
    filipinos who grew up in the philippines have not forgotten to speak filipino. its passing the language on to their kids that they have forgotten. thats my pet peeve. in my family we have made it a point that the kids have to learn how to speak filipino. besides, knowing more languages develops ones mind.
  12. by   suzanne4
    Quote from jonRNMD
    calamansi (philippine lemon) and "balut" are not available here in NY. not sure if it is available in the west coast......

    to my surprise, "isaw" and "chicharon bulaklak" are available here.....my uncle cooks great tasting "sisig" by the way
    Everything is available in the west coast, particularly the Philippine Markets.
  13. by   kalayaan
    and can we get a decent filipino supermarket puh-leaase.

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