Nursing Schools in the Philippines - page 6

by jencas

91,947 Views | 112 Comments

So, I am interested in taking up Nursing in the Philippines, however, I do not wish to go through minor subjects again. I am looking for a decent enough school which has an accelerated program, wherein I am able to finish my... Read More


  1. 0
    hi 2ndcoursergal, I'm from Univeristy of Makati. What would you like to know about it? I'm a 2nd courser myself.
  2. 0
    my daughter wants to study nursing in chinese general hospital, any body who knows how much is the tuition fee for every semester? thnks
  3. 0
    Hi
    My husband and I are also planning to study in the Philippines. We are both an American citizen..I was born in Philippines but my husband is Chinese. So what are the advantage and disadvantage with dual-citizen and Student visa.
  4. 0
    Hi, I'm just getting cofuse about the dual citizenship issues. I know that it's a little too late for me since i already had my dual citizenship US/Philippines, and I'm in my 2nd trimester here at PWU. Nonetheless, i still want to know for future ref. My question is; After I graduated here in the Philippines, should I have to take the Board exam here ( I mean, is it required for me to take it as a dual citizen?) or can i go back there in the US and take the NCLEX? What is NLE? BON? I hope that I can get some answers from yoiu guys, esp. those who have experience (or know someone) who has a dual citizenship (US/Phil) and wish to work in the US. Thanks guys, I really appreciated it.
  5. 0
    A lot will depend on the state and whether the board of nursing (BON) requires you to have a local license or not. Be aware going to one state because it doesn't require a local license and then endorsing doesn't always work as you may still have to meet the state requirement for foreign trained.

    Which state are you planning on working in when you return back to the US?
  6. 0
    i'm planning to work in Washngton D.C. (as a D.C. residence) or near in that area. Thnks soo much
  7. 0
    Okay guys, I have done a years worth of research on going to school in Philippines for nursing if you are currently living in the U.S. My parents think that it is much better to study in the Philippines because tuition is cheap and it's almost the same thing in the U.S just a bit behind on technology. Think about this, all future nurses in the U.S. will have to take the NCLEX to work as a RN; so same goes for you if you are to study in the Philippines but a U.S. citizen. I am thinking about going to Southville International School and Colleges one of the ladies there told me that since I am a U.S. citizen, all I'll have to do is go back to the U.S. and take the NCLEX. Yes Southville is a WASC accredited school and is certified by MIT college in the U.S. MIT is a really hard to get into school and people with brains attend there....so thats a plus. According to SISC website, they have the same accreditation (WASC) as Stanford University, Pepperdine University. Research WASC up to see for your self it stands for Western Association of Schools and Colleges. I asked if their nursing curriculum is the same as the U.S. they said their curriculum is CHED so no. But their business courses are U.S. curriculum. SISC is known for a lot of foreigners/FIL AMS and my dad also learned that some of the US embassy workers send their kids to that school. But this school just established their nursing program just a few years ago. So my cousin in Manila is telling me to think carefully, would I rather attend a school for it's name or a school that has an established nursing program such as UST, CEU, FEU. I told her I'll think about that.

    To add to that, if you are scared that you won't be able to become a nurse in the U.S. well heres a plan B for you. When you move back to the U.S. become a CNA first which is like a something months course (i'm not sure, but it wont take a year). That way you gain experience while working at a hospital or nursing home. While working as a CNA, then study for your NCLEX that you will take in you state. This way being a CNA will give you hands on experience of the health environment in the U.S and experience with the technology. Think about that. Because the NCLEX is something that should be taken carefully, so preparing you some more with hands on experience will boost your NCLEX score. And when you do plan to study in the Philippines for nursing, remember to keep your grades high so that when you come back to the U.S. they will take you into consideration.

    Now for some inspiration for some people I know who have studied nursing in the Philippines but now is RN here in the U.S.

    1. My aunty, she studied nursing in the Province Boyombong. She came here and took up CNA, while she was working as a CNA she studied for the NCLEX, after studying hard...she passed the NCLEX and is now RN at a good hospital. (NO LIE, this is TRUE)
    2. My mom has a co-worker who also studied nursing in the Philippines but in Visaya, she came to the U.S. became a CNA, took her NCLEX and now she is a nurse at a really well known hospital here in my state.

    These people had it harder because they weren't a U.S. citizen at all, but still I'm so amazed that they are now an RN here in the states.

    My mom says that she has many friends who studied nursing in the Philippines and is now a CNA in the states but they are scared to take the NCLEX. Sure the NCLEX might be scary but as long as you have the right materials to study for, you should be fine. What you can also do is when you get back to the states to take the NCLEX, you might want to volunteer at a hospital to gain a feel in the U.S. health care setting.

    Many Fil-AMS consider going to the Philippines for nursing because tuition in the U.S is so expensive. So why not pay for the same education for same results for a lower price right?

    At first I didn't want to attend school in Manila but I thought about it, and if you think about it, one way or the other we will all take the NCLEX, theres no escaping. Use your resources to help you succeed with your NCLEX because it's not like there 100 different types of NCLEX.

    Tips: Choose schools that is accredited or well known in the Philippines if you choose to study in the Philippines. Such as Ateneo, De La Salle, UP, UST, CEU, FEU. SISC, etc...
  8. 0
    [QUOTE=JADAYU;3952168]Okay guys, I have done a years worth of research on going to school in Philippines for nursing if you are currently living in the U.S. My parents think that it is much better to study in the Philippines because tuition is cheap and it's almost the same thing in the U.S just a bit behind on technology. Think about this, all future nurses in the U.S. will have to take the NCLEX to work as a RN; so same goes for you if you are to study in the Philippines but a U.S. citizen. I am thinking about going to Southville International School and Colleges one of the ladies there told me that since I am a U.S. citizen, all I'll have to do is go back to the U.S. and take the NCLEX. Yes Southville is a WASC accredited school and is certified by MIT college in the U.S. MIT is a really hard to get into school and people with brains attend there....so thats a plus. According to SISC website, they have the same accreditation (WASC) as Stanford University, Pepperdine University. Research WASC up to see for your self it stands for Western Association of Schools and Colleges. I asked if their nursing curriculum is the same as the U.S. they said their curriculum is CHED so no. But their business courses are U.S. curriculum. SISC is known for a lot of foreigners/FIL AMS and my dad also learned that some of the US embassy workers send their kids to that school. But this school just established their nursing program just a few years ago. So my cousin in Manila is telling me to think carefully, would I rather attend a school for it's name or a school that has an established nursing program such as UST, CEU, FEU. I told her I'll think about that. "

    This school is only accredited as high school not a college. It is not the same.

    http://www.acswasc.org/directory_searchlist.cfm




    "to add to that, if you are scared that you won't be able to become a nurse in the U.S. well heres a plan B for you. When you move back to the U.S. become a CNA first which is like a something months course (i'm not sure, but it wont take a year). That way you gain experience while working at a hospital or nursing home. While working as a CNA, then study for your NCLEX that you will take in you state. This way being a CNA will give you hands on experience of the health environment in the U.S and experience with the technology. Think about that. Because the NCLEX is something that should be taken carefully, so preparing you some more with hands on experience will boost your NCLEX score. And when you do plan to study in the Philippines for nursing, remember to keep your grades high so that when you come back to the U.S. they will take you into consideration."

    NCLEX is not scary if well prepare.

    Glad to hear you are taking your education seriously. Why not work as CNA now and see if you enjoy patient care. Working as a CNA is not the same as RN, it would be great to work as CNA before and during nursing school but some may find it hard to work as CNA when you have graduated college.
  9. 2
    In connection with JADAYU's post, here's my two cents worth.
    As a nurse and a parent, I respectfully suggest that you take up your nursing course in a reputable school that has an established nursing program. Why?
    The main reason for the proliferation of nursing schools (almost 500 and counting) that do not enforce any kind of academic standard to speak of, is the willingness of a lot of people to patronize them just to get a diploma. Thus the term "diploma mill." This has given rise to the drastic decline in the quality of graduates in the profession that made our country known and respected many years ago, Sadly, that respect and fame (for lack of a better term) is now just a memory in many parts of the world. Please note that I usedthe term many, not all. The only way that these rotten institutions can be driven out of business is to not patronize them. They have done irreparable damage to the reputation of the nursing profession in the Philippines. Let's not even mention here the June 2006 NLE fiasco.........
    Additionally, the training that you'd get if you study in an established school will equip you with the skills you'll need when it would be time to use them. Isn't that the whole point of education? There's a reason why the reputable and established schools are few. They choose their faculty well, and the students that meet their standards have both the intellectual capacity as well as the willingness to put in the hard work to make nursing a lifetime profession, not just earn a diploma.
    With the current economic woes in the US and in other parts of the globe, enrollment in nursing schools has begun to drop drastically. A lot of schools that were put up just to join the bandwagon will close, or maybe just their nursing programs will close, if they have diversified to other exportable professions. Wouldn't it be a shame if you finish your course in a school that has discontinued its program for very obvious reasons, or, worse, no longer exists?
    Fiona59 and juan de la cruz like this.
  10. 0
    [QUOTE=MedSurg32RN;3953571]
    Quote from JADAYU
    Okay guys, I have done a years worth of research on going to school in Philippines for nursing if you are currently living in the U.S. My parents think that it is much better to study in the Philippines because tuition is cheap and it's almost the same thing in the U.S just a bit behind on technology. Think about this, all future nurses in the U.S. will have to take the NCLEX to work as a RN; so same goes for you if you are to study in the Philippines but a U.S. citizen. I am thinking about going to Southville International School and Colleges one of the ladies there told me that since I am a U.S. citizen, all I'll have to do is go back to the U.S. and take the NCLEX. Yes Southville is a WASC accredited school and is certified by MIT college in the U.S. MIT is a really hard to get into school and people with brains attend there....so thats a plus. According to SISC website, they have the same accreditation (WASC) as Stanford University, Pepperdine University. Research WASC up to see for your self it stands for Western Association of Schools and Colleges. I asked if their nursing curriculum is the same as the U.S. they said their curriculum is CHED so no. But their business courses are U.S. curriculum. SISC is known for a lot of foreigners/FIL AMS and my dad also learned that some of the US embassy workers send their kids to that school. But this school just established their nursing program just a few years ago. So my cousin in Manila is telling me to think carefully, would I rather attend a school for it's name or a school that has an established nursing program such as UST, CEU, FEU. I told her I'll think about that. "

    This school is only accredited as high school not a college. It is not the same.

    http://www.acswasc.org/directory_searchlist.cfm




    "to add to that, if you are scared that you won't be able to become a nurse in the U.S. well heres a plan B for you. When you move back to the U.S. become a CNA first which is like a something months course (i'm not sure, but it wont take a year). That way you gain experience while working at a hospital or nursing home. While working as a CNA, then study for your NCLEX that you will take in you state. This way being a CNA will give you hands on experience of the health environment in the U.S and experience with the technology. Think about that. Because the NCLEX is something that should be taken carefully, so preparing you some more with hands on experience will boost your NCLEX score. And when you do plan to study in the Philippines for nursing, remember to keep your grades high so that when you come back to the U.S. they will take you into consideration."

    NCLEX is not scary if well prepare.

    Glad to hear you are taking your education seriously. Why not work as CNA now and see if you enjoy patient care. Working as a CNA is not the same as RN, it would be great to work as CNA before and during nursing school but some may find it hard to work as CNA when you have graduated college.
    Actually I have volunteered at a Hospital for 116 hours, through that I have met many foreign nurses. One from China too. Most of them from the Philippines. And my mom is a CNA she takes care of patients at our home, I help her sometimes and I enjoy it. I believe that I enjoy helping others, it's not because of the pay it's because the gratitude you feel when you know that you have helped someone. In my junior year I took health occupations and medical terminology which I believe will help me in my future nursing classes. Now I am currently taking a high school course of health occupations part II but this class is a nursing asisstant class we are learning what Nursing Asisstants learned we are also eligible to take the NA test at the end of the year if we want to become an NA while attending Nursing school. We are just not certified so we won't be able to work in Nursing Homes. I even met a PR who said that there will be a student from Manila who is studying to become a Doctor, and he will be doing is internship/clinical at the Children's hospital here in my state.


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