Attention IEN's: Things you should know to make your move to Canada much easier. - page 2

by clay07, RN | 9,324 Views | 57 Comments

Hi all: On behalf of my fellow IEN's, would someone who has gone through the process of immigrating to the different provinces in Canada, please share with us your experiences and the things we can do before actually getting... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from mzee
    This is the first time I am posting....I was really touched by clay07 story (from since she was in the USA to when you did your CRNE).
    I am in the exact same shoe she was in...worked in the USA as a nurse under OPT and now I am considering becoming a nurse in Canada but I have couple of questions that I need help with.

    1.What can I do to get my applications processed ASAP?
    2. Any tips on how you did your study towards the CRNA (did you use your American text books and NCLEX revision question)?
    3.What is the difference between NCLEX questions and CRNA?
    4.Plssss if somebody has notes to help study please email me so I can get started.
    1. Application takes time and that will vary depending on which province college of registered nurses you apply to.
    2. CRNE is totally different to CRNA do you mean CRNE?
    3. CRNE is different to NCLEX and needs to be prepared differently. Not many books available on CRNE
    4. There are several threads discussing CRNE in the Canadian forum suggest a good read

    You may not complete the process in time but a lot will depend on how much time you have left on OPT
    clay07 likes this.
  2. 1
    Quote from mzee
    This is the first time I am posting....I was really touched by clay07 story (from since she was in the USA to when you did your CRNE).
    I am in the exact same shoe she was in...worked in the USA as a nurse under OPT and now I am considering becoming a nurse in Canada but I have couple of questions that I need help with.

    1.What can I do to get my applications processed ASAP?
    2. Any tips on how you did your study towards the CRNA (did you use your American text books and NCLEX revision question)?
    3.What is the difference between NCLEX questions and CRNA?
    4.Plssss if somebody has notes to help study please email me so I can get started.
    Hi mzee:
    I am going to be as detailed as possible because I remember how clueless I felt, not knowing the right questions to ask....

    Process:

    There isn't anything you can do to get your application processed by the provincial board of choice ASAP. The only part you have control over is getting everything to CNO or whichever provincial board you chose.

    I visited my sister in September last year. I had shown interest in applying to CNO earlier that year and had requested and already received a application package, I took it with me to Canada just in case I decided to start the process.

    So, when I got there and made the decision I put a plan in action. It helps that you are prepared to spend some money to get the process out of your hand.


    1. Filled out package.
    2. Sent all I needed to send to my school in USA, board, and to my previous employer. (This is why it is so important to establish healthy relationships whereever you go and to not burn bridges) as well as same day mailing to CNO. I called all involved and asked them to treat the matter with urgency. With the board in the US, I called and asked how long it would take and how much it would require to verify my license. I believe it was $40 USD. There's nothing you can do where the board is concerned. You send a money order with the paper work required by CNO to your board of nursing (all these forms are in the application package) and just hope that they treat the matter with urgency.
    3. I used FEDEX(free ad here) for everything
    4.In package to CNO, I sent everything they expected, including my copies of my CGFNS, diploma, license, and certificate of license in the USA not your OPT work permit. Your license does have an expiration date, attach a letter explaining why it is not renewed, if at the time of the application it is not current. They will verify everything you send them from your licensure board, it just helps your case to clarify possible questions.
    5.I waited. Made calls to the hospital and school to ask them to send everything back through FEDEX. I asked a friend to pick up the sealed form from my employer and send it through FEDEX. The school's administrator was pretty good in assisting me to get the package off ASAP.
    6.Follow the instructions in the application package to the 'T' you can't lose. When in doubt CALL them (the provincial board of choice). I keep referring to CNO (College of Nurses of Ontario) because its my board of choice.

    So, it was out my hands, now up to my school, my board of nursing in USA, previous place of employment, CNO and the mailing system. I waited. I started the process in September and heard from them (really, I was the one who called) in November (a month and a half of processing-not bad). Just in time to hear that I was assessed and found eligible to sit the CRNE (Canadian Registered Nurses Exam). They said I was sent a package in the mail but that the deadline to sit in February was two days later. Thank God for technology! I asked if there were alternatives, yes! They attached and sent the application to sit the CRNE to me via email and I was able to print off and send it back to them using you guess it, FEDEX.

    Got confirmation that I was able to sit the exam in February.

    Exam:

    I purchased the book recommended by CNO-CRNE Prep Guide, I might have looked in an NCLEX book once or twice but not really. I looked at the type of questions and focused my attention on how to answer them. The questions on the CRNE are MOSTLY psychosocial as opposed to NCLEX where alot of clinical judgement, meds and their effects and...
    So when studying think about what you learned in Mental Health.Therapeutic nursing...Not so much what you'd do first (although, please note these are important as well, you should still study as if you would for NCLEX) but just focus alot on psychosocial events. I recommend getting the book suggested by your provincial board of choice. This will help in focus studying. I also bought the practice exam a couple of weeks before the exam. Go to the website of the provincial board and read through thoroughly, again if you have questions, call them.

    After the exam:

    Come online and go through the waiting process with those on allnurses, great place to get support and vent anxieties!

    I recommend that while in Canada for the exam, visit career fairs. If possible try and get an interview with a possible employer, they understand the process...remember to always have copies of everything with you including resume.

    I hope I helped.
    Last edit by clay07 on Jun 8, '09
    sandraann likes this.
  3. 0
    Thank you soo much! This was really helpful.
    Do you happen to have any notes that I can borrow? or know any books apart from the one recommended by the CNA that have lots of information regarding psychosocial events (did you just use the CRNE prep book only to prepare for the exam?)
    Are the lab levels and PH values same as USA?
    Once more thank you!
  4. 0
    Quote from mzee
    Thank you soo much! This was really helpful.
    Do you happen to have any notes that I can borrow? or know any books apart from the one recommended by the CNA that have lots of information regarding psychosocial events (did you just use the CRNE prep book only to prepare for the exam?)
    Are the lab levels and PH values same as USA?
    Once more thank you!
    Yes, I used the Prep Guide as the main study tool. I used the book as opposed to the cd since it is a written exam. Unlike NCLEX where I used the cd.

    Medicine is standard whereever you go, so yes the lab and hemodynamic values are based off an international standard (someone please correct me if I'm wrong). The difference is in the medications and the measurements used. USA has not converted to the metric system yet, so they still use feet, inches and pound, unlike Canada which uses meter, centimeter and kilogram (this is good to know when study or preparing for the exam). I am sure there maybe some cultural difference, but...

    No I don't have notes, I just made a few jottings in the book. Any of your nursing books should have questions surrounding psychsocial events, again, I must remind you that you should however study as though you would for NCLEX: prioritizing, safety, delegation, labs...and like silverdragon said there are forums which focus on how people have prepared for the CRNE.



    We'll figure it out.
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Jun 9, '09 : Reason: PM to member
  5. 1
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    If you have already taken and passed CRNE then I think you are already registered and shouldn't have to take long to work.
    clay07 is only registered in Ontario if the registration documents were filed and the registration fee paid. That's in addition to the cost of the exam. It might be a good idea to find out when the CNO's registration year starts and time initial registration so that you only have to pay once. When I moved to Alberta iin 2002, I started my job on September 9 and had to renew my license before I'd even started! I'd registered as soon as my paperwork was complete then found out that the license I got in August was only good until September 30. So I paid nearly $700 for licenses in that calendar year. And of course since then the fees have only increased. This year we're paying $472.
    Quote from clay07
    Medicine is standard whereever you go, so yes the lab and hemodynamic values are based off an international standard (someone please correct me if I'm wrong). The difference is in the medications and the measurements used. USA has not converted to the metric system yet, so they still use feet, inches and pound, unlike Canada which uses meter, centimeter and kilogram (this is good to know when study or preparing for the exam). I am sure there maybe some cultural difference, but...
    Lab values are not exactly the same. For some things Canada uses SI units; for example, normal blood glucose levels in the US are 70-110 mg/dL and in Canada they're 3.3-5.8 mmol/L. Total bilirubin in the US = 0-1.0 mg/dL and in Canada 0-17 mmol/L. Desirable cholesterol: US = <239 mg/dL and Canada = <6.18 mmol/L. BUN in the US is 8-25 mg/dL and in Canada 2.9-8.9 mmol/L, creatinine 0.5-1.4 mg/dL and 60-125 umol/L here. These are only a few examples. And there are a number of values that are the same on both sides of the border; it's a matter of knowing how your facility interprets and reports things.

    We call some of our drugs different names here too. The generic omeprazole is Prilosec in the US and Losec here; pantoprazole is Protonix there and Pantaloc here, bumetanide is Bumex there and Burinex here. Again just a few examples.
    clay07 likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from janfrn
    clay07 is only registered in Ontario if the registration documents were filed and the registration fee paid. That's in addition to the cost of the exam. It might be a good idea to find out when the CNO's registration year starts and time initial registration so that you only have to pay once. When I moved to Alberta iin 2002, I started my job on September 9 and had to renew my license before I'd even started! I'd registered as soon as my paperwork was complete then found out that the license I got in August was only good until September 30. So I paid nearly $700 for licenses in that calendar year. And of course since then the fees have only increased. This year we're paying $472.

    Lab values are not exactly the same. For some things Canada uses SI units; for example, normal blood glucose levels in the US are 70-110 mg/dL and in Canada they're 3.3-5.8 mmol/L. Total bilirubin in the US = 0-1.0 mg/dL and in Canada 0-17 mmol/L. Desirable cholesterol: US = <239 mg/dL and Canada = <6.18 mmol/L. BUN in the US is 8-25 mg/dL and in Canada 2.9-8.9 mmol/L, creatinine 0.5-1.4 mg/dL and 60-125 umol/L here. These are only a few examples. And there are a number of values that are the same on both sides of the border; it's a matter of knowing how your facility interprets and reports things.

    We call some of our drugs different names here too. The generic omeprazole is Prilosec in the US and Losec here; pantoprazole is Protonix there and Pantaloc here, bumetanide is Bumex there and Burinex here. Again just a few examples.
    Gulp at registration fee...on that first thing in the morrow.
  7. 0
    CLAY 07,

    I called CNO yesterday and I was disappointed that a practice agent said that I should expect another 12 weeks till I get an assessment. Which I find it hard to believe to think I sent my application last March 31, 2009. Assessment period should have started since and counting.

    Did you speak to a particular contact person? a Supervisor ? How did you made the processing so short?

    Thank you for sharing your experience.
  8. 0
    I am referring to my CRNE eligibility application. As I read on your previous post, you had your assessment done in a month and a half.
    How is it possible? please give me advise ^_-
  9. 0
    Quote from rogue2578
    CLAY 07,

    I called CNO yesterday and I was disappointed that a practice agent said that I should expect another 12 weeks till I get an assessment. Which I find it hard to believe to think I sent my application last March 31, 2009. Assessment period should have started since and counting.

    Did you speak to a particular contact person? a Supervisor ? How did you made the processing so short?

    Thank you for sharing your experience.
    I was told the same thing, 12 weeks. Just know different factors determine the process. I am not sure why mine took a month and half, it is strange that you haven't yet been assessed. Outside of what I have shared I haven't done anything differently. I wish I had an answer for you. I believe I spoke with a customer service rep.. Did you ask them if they had all the requirments you sent in to start the process?

    I really don't know...since March? Well theystill have about 3 weeks left. Call back tomorrow. Maybe someone else will be able to clarify what we hope to be a misinformation about it taking another 12 weeks.
    Last edit by clay07 on Jun 9, '09
  10. 1
    The more time that passes by the more applications from IENs each of the Colleges of Nursing have to process. The more they have to process, the longer it takes to get to the top of the pile. Simple supply (assessors' time) and demand (applications on their desks).

    clay07, Ontario does their registration a bit differently than the rest of Canada. The CNO charges $171.73 for registration which doesn't ever expire, but to remain a member you have to renew annually at a cost of $122.66; you cannot work as an RN in Ontario without CNO registration. BUT... all that money buys you is registration. In other provinces the fee includes membership in the Canadian Nurses' Association, Canadian Nurse Protective Service coverage, access to group insurance (car, home, disability) and two monthly nursing journals as well as discounted educational opportunities, access to scholarships and bursaries and representative lobbying efforts to maintain nursing standards and initiatives. In Ontario to get those same benefits you have to be a member of the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario (RNAO) at a cost of $265 a year. So the total for a new nurse in Ontario to have all the same benefits that the other Colleges porvide would be $436.73; renewal would cost $387.66. Not a huge difference.
    clay07 likes this.


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