What Is Your Most Gross, Yucky, Disgusting Nursing Horror Story? - page 50

:D Here is my most gross, yucky, disgusting nursing story! I was working a night shift on a tele floor as a new Nurse. We had this one poor old lady who was confused and was restrained as... Read More

  1. by   nu one
    We were the coming in as night shift when the outgoing charge nurse told me to help her with a patient who just came in, a dnr and who as soon as he was transferred in bed expired. He had a throat and lung cancer, with a trach stoma. Were cleaning him up and I noticed this spring-like bloody material on his chest. It looked like the man coughed out his trachea on his last few efforts to breathe!!!
  2. by   Kitkat23
    :uhoh21: My story isn't gross, but it was freaky. As a student aide at the clinical site, I was put in charge of feeding this elderly gentleman with Alzheimer's at dinnertime. He was in his late stage, had a feeding tube, and refused to eat his meals. (that's why he had a G-tube.) Anyway, the charge nurse and my instructor told me to try to get the man to eat his dinner, so I did. I would put bites of food in his mouth and he would spit it right out. He kept calling me by his dead's wife name, Molly and was saying that I was a good cook and made the best french fries and burgers. (He was having lasagna and carrots.)

    I didn't correct him, but I was playing along with him by saying, "I'm sure your wife was a great cook. She'd want you to eat all your dinner and get your strength. Have another bite." I tried coaxing and encouraging him several times like the nurse told me, but it was no use. He kept spitting out his food; but managed to sip his tea three times. He kept playing footsie with me under the table and saying, "You're beautiful, Molly." I was freaked out, but felt sorry for the poor man who lost his wife.

    Finally, he told me to take the tray away from him, so when I picked it up to bring it to the food cart, he grabbed my butt and said in a loud voice, "You have a nice butt, Molly." Everyone in the diningroom heard and started to laugh. One of the aides said, "Okay, Ray. Behave yourself." The staff and my classmates started to call me Molly for the rest of the night. I was so embarrassed, even though he couldn't help it. Being a CNA has its moments. It was quite an adventure.
  3. by   irishnurse68
    Quote from cakarol
    OMG --- this was defanentaly not a good thread for a new nursing student to have read...I'm really starting to reconsider....~feeling a lil dizzy~

    --CLaire
    I was just thinking that same thing!! Actually, I am having a ball reading all of these, can't remember when I have laughed so hard! I should be studying my med surg right now...this is more fun
  4. by   EricTAMUCC-BSN
    I had a patient with a swollen scrotom and bubbling penis, according to one physician and a veteran nurse it was similar to ascites caused by his acute renal failure. Poor guy was in bad shape.


    Quote from kc2004
    about 10 years ago when I was doing my clinicals in OR,
    we had a man come in from a rural area with an inguinal
    hernia. I had to assist so I walk into the OR and here is this man
    with a scrotal sac the size of a basketball. All of his intestines
    were inside his scrotum. We had to open up his abdomen and
    pull the intestines out of the hernia to put them back. This took
    about 2hrs, then we had to do the actual hernia repair!

    I was wondering the whole time about how this man
    got his pants over his nuts. Or did he come to the hospital
    in one of those mumu dresses like Mrs.Roper from Three's
    Company used to wear?
  5. by   acynicalnurse
    Quote from stevierae
    oh----how sad. i seem to remember that advanced aids patients can suffer from organic dementia, just as cancer patients with brain mets can (or, of course, alzheimer's patients.) he probably had absolutely no control over his behavior---interesting that he remembered it.

    i was curious about this, so i googled "aids" & "psychosis" together and came up with this:

    "dementia is a known complication of hiv infection. it tends to occur late in the course of hiv infection, and is usually associated with high viral loads and low cd4 counts seen in people who are not taking haart (highly active antiretroviral therapy) or who are on a failing haart regimen."



    know what you mean i have looked after people who have seen them selves acting strange and or violent ( aged and mostly post op till drugs well out of their system) but state they had no control and opologize perfusely. which is nice i feel you know taking responsibility for what they did.
    :uhoh21:
  6. by   acynicalnurse
    [font=lucida console]i have loved reading these stories and the replys so much i have never laughed so much despite some of the grossness of the stories
    my gross stories are to do with wound dressings i have had to do when i was a grad in my first year. i have always looked after kids so poo, snot, and vomit were always known entities to me but i have been surprised lol on occasion

    1 / some lady in her 40's- 50's she had i think diabetes or venous disease but she had had bi lateral bka (below the knee amputation) and then a one side went worst than the other so had a r/ aka (above the knee amp.) and then both sides got worst so she had a l/ aka and also a r/ ampututation up to her pelvis. she became septic and had mrsa in the wounds. the smell was bad +++ but the pus and exudate from the would was terrible - green and mouldly looking. i learned quickly to mouth breath and keep talking to her like it was a stroll in the park cos she was so upset about the whole thing and needed to relax. she was such a co operative pt too and i felt for her cos it all happened over a couple of years. she was for four hourly dressing changes and it took over an hour and being on the low end of the pecking order as a grad
    guess who got the job :angryfire but took it in my stride and was glad of the experience as a newbie

    2/ another one was a lady late 60's with bi lateral breast ca that she ignored for years then got dx which also developed mets and refused active treatment except for wound care. from her just below her neck to just below her breast line was a fungating/ green/brown/ mouldy smelly layer but it was actually attached to her breasts. she was for six hourly dressing changes with charcol imbedded dressings cos even she couldn't stand the smell . on top of that she was on and off confused cos of brain mets and we had some male rn's whom she refused to let near her.

    isn't nursng grand i was lucky though both patients were very co operative and not aggressive
    jo the cynicalnurse
    Last edit by acynicalnurse on Mar 18, '05
  7. by   happthearts
    If anyone know's what this is please tell me When I was an aide in California many years ago I was sitting with a Pt about 85 years old receiving blood product she was dying of cancer.

    Her stomach began to fill up with the blood and she began to sweat I noticed that when I sponged her down with the white wash cloth that there was blood on the wash cloth .I thought maybe she had a tear some where but she didn't have any tears I noticed that the sweat droplets looked blood tinged So I touched her arm with my glove and noticed blood on the glove.Withen in minutes the lady expired when we moved her we noticed on the sheet where her upper back had been there was blood also.

    This has alway kind of intrested me as they have said in the bible Jeaus when he died bled from every pore.Alway been a mystery to me.
  8. by   vidrine rn
    Quote from rebelwaclause
    This is why I sing hymnals on my way to work! "Please watch ova me Lawd! (hahahaha)"

    My worst experiences had been while I was an EMT with the county contracted ambulance 911 provider. We often responded to county calls from protective services. the bay area has quite a few cities that are highly "elderly" populated.

    We are called to a scene in which an elderly woman was reported with ALOC (Mayun...I hate to hear ALOC now! its a catch all!). We are told to enter fully gowned/universal precautions. Well, it was hot that day and at the time our company wore jumpsuits, so I declined to put one on. We get to the home, the inside was dimly lit and filed with books stacked to the ceiling, empty cans of food, trash thrown everywhere the books and empty cans weren't and styrophone cups with old coffee in them. You can imagine the stinch! Oh...did I mention roaches, flies, "lions and tigers and bears...oh my!!!?"

    The woman was in the back of the house. It was a narrow walkway to her. We decide to sit-pic her a short distance to the guerney and get her outta there. The first attempt, I lost my footing and my knees hit her carpeted floor. "Splat"..I thought "awwww @#$!". It wasn't untill we got her loaded into the ambulance that I realized it was urine and a few roach body parts on my knees. A leg, an antenna. (Bare with me...I'm blanking out and sweating telling this even though that was eight years ago!)I asked her the typical "how are you feeling today?" She insisted she felt a little tired after coming home from teaching the children that day, as a roach climbed from under her wig to the back of her neck. I wonder if she noticed during
    "recess" the petrified poo-log that was working its way up her back?

    Our unit was down long enough for me to take off my jumpsuit, throw it in the dumpster and go home, swatting imaginary roaches that ran through the flashes of my mind! Our ambulance was out for a week to make sure it didn't become those critters new home!

    (Imma faint now...bye!)
    :roll oh my god that is so funny
  9. by   HEARTNRSE05
    I am laughing so hard I am crying. I did not actually witness this one, but my husband is also an LVN and a paramedic. He told me about a call they got on a homeless guy that had passed out in a parking lot. When they rolled up and assessed the guy they began doing CPR and were preparing to inutbate and the guy starts puking, and not just your ordinary vomit either.... he was puking catfood and peanut butter. My husband loves peanut butter, but said it was a long time before he could eat it after that.
  10. by   Ms. Mad
    Quote from critcarenurse16
    Brace yourself for this one. I was suctioning a newly trached patient in the ICU and went a little too far causing the patient to gag and cough. Luckily I wear a face shield right? Well after her coughing jag I removed my face shield and leaned over the patient to comfort her. She suddenly coughed and out of her trach came a fair sized mucous plug...that flew into my mouth and down my throat! I was the one gagging after that. Now I never-ever remove my face shield until away from the bed.
    Some of these stories were really gross but yours, beats them all for now! I'm still gagging! Still a student but I'm definately going to watch out for those trach pts.
  11. by   ERNurse752
    Quote from happthearts
    If anyone know's what this is please tell me When I was an aide in California many years ago I was sitting with a Pt about 85 years old receiving blood product she was dying of cancer.

    Her stomach began to fill up with the blood and she began to sweat I noticed that when I sponged her down with the white wash cloth that there was blood on the wash cloth .I thought maybe she had a tear some where but she didn't have any tears I noticed that the sweat droplets looked blood tinged So I touched her arm with my glove and noticed blood on the glove.Withen in minutes the lady expired when we moved her we noticed on the sheet where her upper back had been there was blood also.

    This has alway kind of intrested me as they have said in the bible Jeaus when he died bled from every pore.Alway been a mystery to me.

    It might have been DIC, disseminated intravascular coagulation. You can do a google search to find some good resources about it. I just got home from work, so I'm too tired to go into an explanation.
  12. by   sandypinktruck
    I have been contemplating whether or not I should post this one or not. It was definately a BAD day for me the day this happened, but things happen, right?

    One morning I came into work, was informed that an elderly 80 yr old lady had passed during the night, about four hours earlier. She had been ill for quite some time, and her death was expected. Her family was in full attendance, with approximately 20 family members out in the hallway.

    The morgue attendant came up to the floor, and asked me to assist with the transfer onto the gurney, and escort the body downstairs. We went into the room together, shut the door, and wheeled the gurney beside the bed.

    I locked the wheel on my end. I KNOW that I locked my wheels. The attendant said she was ready, so we leaned over the gurney, grabbed the ends of the body bag, and got ready to do the one, two, three, heave ho. Did I say that the patient had weighed approximately 200 pounds?

    I guess it is evident what happened, the gurney toppled over on top of me, with the deceased (all 200 pounds) also on top of me. I crawled out from under the gurney, but there was NO way that I was going to stick my head out into the hallway and ask for assistance. Remember, the family was still in the hallway?

    We put the bed in the very lowest position, then both of us got under the same end of the body bag, and lifted, half shoved the deceased back onto the hospital bed. During the course of working up a sweat, the morgue attendant commented that this was like lifting dead weight. Uh, yeah right, I guess thats what it was.

    We finally completed the transfer to the gurney without further incident, but I did notice several large bruises on myself the next day, along with strained muscles from the lifting. My lesson learned was to always, always lock the wheels, and also to double check that all wheels are locked.
  13. by   happthearts
    Quote from ERNurse752
    It might have been DIC, disseminated intravascular coagulation. You can do a google search to find some good resources about it. I just got home from work, so I'm too tired to go into an explanation.
    Thanks ER I think this could be it.

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