What Is Your Most Gross, Yucky, Disgusting Nursing Horror Story? - page 24

:D Here is my most gross, yucky, disgusting nursing story! I was working a night shift on a tele floor as a new Nurse. We had this one poor old lady who was confused and was restrained as... Read More

  1. by   FranEMTnurse
    Quote from missmercy
    My Husband would DIE!!!

    He is a bit sheltered and conservative! Don't know how he puts up with me!!( and to think I have corrupted the kids too -- HMMMMM! OH WELL!) He will never be able to say that life w/ me is boring!
    Ain't that the truth now. He married it for better or for worse, and he went into it with his dear little ole eyes wide open. Mercy, mercy. Now he'll just have to deal with it as it comes. Because our sick ways give us the jollies. My daughter Laurel, says my son-in-law has now been thoroughly corrupted. Hee,hee. :hatparty:
  2. by   teeituptom
    I dont have that prob.
    My wife was a nurse
  3. by   StarvingMomma
    :angryfire http://home.att.net/~j.knibbe/wsb/html/view.cgi-home.html-.html:angryfire

    The current idea in the nursing home industry is to keep the facility's Report Card out of the courts as evidence against them.

    Thsi is just more of what their intentions are, to continue to
    get away with killing off our elderly.

    Stop them from killing our elderly!!!

    The works of the nursing home owners is legal already and to add this in the picture will speed them on and into getting the job done faster.

    Ila Swan, the National Spokeswoman on the nursing home industry has spent 30 years already claiming all that I am saying to you here.

    Will you stand by and allow this to happen?

    And if so, "Why?"

    If not, then make your claim to stop this injustice.

    Write, call and email the President on this issue.

    Spread this message.
  4. by   ktwlpn
    oh for goodness sake...I have seen this website before...... It just defies description-check it out for yourselves....
  5. by   susi_q
    StarvingMamma - I am so sorry for your loss. It sounds like you have really been hurting. I don't know the hospitals/doctors/nursing homes that you speak about ... I do know many of them from where I have lived and work - and assure you that your perceived understanding is not typical. End of life issues are difficult. Having been estranged from your mother for 15 years prior to her final struggles did not help your ability to emotionally adapt to the fact that her body was failing. You state that you don't have a medical background ... yet you sound like you made assumptions from the start that "they" were out to get you. You used the Emergancy Room as a primary provider. When you bring a patient to the ER, we don't have access to a history, we don't know what her "normal" is. We ask questions, we run tests, then we make an educated diagnosis. If you don't know your mother well enough - and you are treating us like the enemy - we are not able to get a full picture. You are certainly grieving the loss of your mother - her life, but probably the wasted years of estrangement as well. You might want to consider talking to a professional to help you sort thru your feelings.

    Now ... lets get this posting back on track!
  6. by   teeituptom
    lets get back on track and have some fun
  7. by   NursesRmofun
    Quote from andylane78
    Had a guy in the ER, mentally slow, with an infected stasis ulcer to the back of his calf x 1 month. Picture this, large round area of black escar surounded by a "canal" of non-existant and barely there flesh. The the decaying flesh had been gnawed away by non the less magotts which were still in residence in large numbers in his leg. The smell was so nasty!!!!! Stank up the whole ER! Then........it gets better. He decides he has to pee and can only do this standing up! Gets out of bed bleeding and dropping magotts everywhere! Then surgery decides to debride the nasty leg IN THE ROOM! EEWWWW!!! Discovered that lidocaine makes magotts "dance".
    Needless to say not much appetite that shift!
    I knew maggots would be involved in some of the worst stories. :uhoh21:
  8. by   NursesRmofun
    [font=franklin gothic medium]i was a student nurse working as an aide. i was doing rounds with a young rn. a elderly patient who was on dnr status had died in his bed. he had died with one leg over the side rail and loose stool all over the bed and all over him. it was a sight. poor guy.
  9. by   teeituptom
    thats called a Code Brown
  10. by   FranEMTnurse
    StarvingMomma,
    I looked at your photos, and do understand why you feel that way. But most nursing homes are now regulated by JACCHO now. Out of the four in our area, there is only one that did have a bad reputation, and was closed down until they cleaned up their act.

    I worked as a nurses aide in a nursing home many years ago when there was no such organization as JACCHO, and nurses aides did not have to be certified. Some of the sites I saw were much worse than what your photos show. I have changed dressings on people with bedsores that were so deep the base of the spine was visible. Another was a woman with breast cancer. Back then, there was very little cure for it like there is today. There was a blue, purple, and deep red honeycomed area where her right breast used to be.

    I felt soooo bad for the residents who were left there and forgotten by their loved ones. Many were the people who needed help back then, and the only way they could get it was to sign their property and home over to Social Services. I often heard the term, "Mr or Mrs -----went to the poor house today. Guess that'll be the end of them!"

    That is the reason I worked hard to publish a monthly newspaper called, "The Gay Nineties Review." I also wrote poetry about two or three individuals each month. The title of the poetry column was, "Life Begins at 80. I also formed a club for the men called, "The Cracker Barrel Club." I held meetings with them, getting them to talk about things that they used to do, or things that had happened to them in the past. I usually began with a lead-in, telling them I lived in a house by an old gristmill, etc. just to get them to feel at ease. They loved that so much they made a jewelry box for me out of a wooden cigar box. It was one of my most prized possessions for many years. All the residents looked forward to reading The Gay Nineties Review every month.
    A co-worker and I even decorated both floors of the place for Christmas one year, That made the front page of the local newspaper.

    I'm not saying that because I want to show the world what good deeds I did. Far from it. I did it because I felt bad for them and knew they needed a diversion from their current way of living. It gave them something to look forward to.

    However, since 2001, I have been gravely ill four different times, and now dread to hear the words, "She may have to be placed in a nursing home." I have heard nurses who took care of me talk about it.

    My reason for feeling that way goes back to when I was in nursing school. Even though there are activities for those people now, and there are better regulations, some are still being left there and forgotten by their families, and the look I saw on those residents' faces haunted me.

    I will give an example: As I was walking down the hall of the nursing home where I did some of my clinical work, I glanced at a woman sitting in the TV room in her wheelchair supposedly watching TV. As I glanced at her eyes, I saw a look of emptiness in them. She wasn't watching the TV, she was looking at it with a blank stare in her eyes, because she most likely was depressed, and longed for the life she had in the past. That is why I now have a long-term caregiver at home.



    Quote from StarvingMomma
    :angryfire http://home.att.net/~j.knibbe/wsb/html/view.cgi-home.html-.html:angryfire

    The current idea in the nursing home industry is to keep the facility's Report Card out of the courts as evidence against them.

    Thsi is just more of what their intentions are, to continue to
    get away with killing off our elderly.

    Stop them from killing our elderly!!!

    The works of the nursing home owners is legal already and to add this in the picture will speed them on and into getting the job done faster.

    Ila Swan, the National Spokeswoman on the nursing home industry has spent 30 years already claiming all that I am saying to you here.

    Will you stand by and allow this to happen?

    And if so, "Why?"

    If not, then make your claim to stop this injustice.

    Write, call and email the President on this issue.

    Spread this message.
  11. by   Twright49015
    I have worked in a Nursing Home for 7 years now....One of my patients was this little old lady who had dimentia but she was with it and knew what she was doing. After we put her to bed one night we went back in a bit later for rounds....usually we don't turn the big overhead lights on at night in the rooms just the over sink lights. This time for some reason we turned on the big light.......what came next is funny now but not at the time..... This lady had a BM sometime after we lied her down, she took the BM made it into little round balls, and lined them up on her bed rail, the minute we turned the light on she started flipping them at us......we had to grab the curtain between us CENA that were in the room and the flying BM balls until she flipped them all. She thought it was funny laughing all the time she did it. From that day on we all had to peek around the corner to make sure there were no BM balls waiting for us before entering the room.
  12. by   Stitchie
    Quote from Twright49015
    I have worked in a Nursing Home for 7 years now....One of my patients was this little old lady who had dimentia but she was with it and knew what she was doing. After we put her to bed one night we went back in a bit later for rounds....usually we don't turn the big overhead lights on at night in the rooms just the over sink lights. This time for some reason we turned on the big light.......what came next is funny now but not at the time..... This lady had a BM sometime after we lied her down, she took the BM made it into little round balls, and lined them up on her bed rail, the minute we turned the light on she started flipping them at us......we had to grab the curtain between us CENA that were in the room and the flying BM balls until she flipped them all. She thought it was funny laughing all the time she did it. From that day on we all had to peek around the corner to make sure there were no BM balls waiting for us before entering the room.
  13. by   soltera
    Quote from Twright49015
    I have worked in a Nursing Home for 7 years now....One of my patients was this little old lady who had dimentia but she was with it and knew what she was doing. After we put her to bed one night we went back in a bit later for rounds....usually we don't turn the big overhead lights on at night in the rooms just the over sink lights. This time for some reason we turned on the big light.......what came next is funny now but not at the time..... This lady had a BM sometime after we lied her down, she took the BM made it into little round balls, and lined them up on her bed rail, the minute we turned the light on she started flipping them at us......we had to grab the curtain between us CENA that were in the room and the flying BM balls until she flipped them all. She thought it was funny laughing all the time she did it. From that day on we all had to peek around the corner to make sure there were no BM balls waiting for us before entering the room.

    i've been through some strange things but your story should get a prize!!

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