Nursing Superstitions! - page 6

I thought this would be a fun topic since nurses are the most superstitious people in the world! I believe that disaster will strike if someone says the "Q" word. I even cringe if a patient says... Read More

  1. by   jenjenrn
    Glad to see that the "Q" word is universal in nursing!

    No one mentioned putting a quarter under the pillow of a pending "celestial discharge" to buy some time. It really does work!

    I always bring an extra foley insertion tray...I'll never need it if I do!

    If I brag about my iv skills...well, you can probably guess what happens...

    Never work on Friday the 13th, the week before or after a full moon, or on Mondays

    Never mention the name of a frequent flyer...the rule on my floor is if you are the person who says the name, you have that patient when they come in!
  2. by   CATHYW
    I remembered a couple more-when I was new to nursing on a telemetry/ICU step-down unit, I was always cautioned not to turn critically ill patients on their left side. Something about pressure on the heart, making it stop...
    If your unconscious patient, with mouth open, has their tongue protruding to one side, that is the "Q" sign, and watch out!
  3. by   CindyJRN
    Picking myself up off the floor LMAO!! Didn't realize how much we all have in common, being from all over the country. The 3's, the "Q" and the frequent fliers are definitely universal. How many of you also check earlobes? Don't laugh yet...this was taught to me many years ago in long-term care and I've been teaching it to my acute care buddies. If you have a patient you suspect is "preparing for celestial discharge", his earlobe will have a definite crease and be "folding up".
    Also, never express a desire "out loud" for a quick exit at the end of the shift because your coworker is NEVER LATE nor should you have every chart signed and closed with your purse on the desk...a surefire way of a last minute admit or code!
  4. by   LadyLurker
    Originally posted by CindyJRN
    How many of you also check earlobes? Don't laugh yet...this was taught to me many years ago in long-term care and I've been teaching it to my acute care buddies. If you have a patient you suspect is "preparing for celestial discharge", his earlobe will have a definite crease and be "folding up".
    YES!! I check earlobes! And I hesitated to mention it, because it sounds so.... weird.
    But it's SO true.
  5. by   CindyJRN
    Strange, yes, but when I go back to work tomorrow I'll have a couple of extra quarters to "buy time" and warn my CNA's NOT to touch my knots in the bedsheets!!!
  6. by   shyviolet78
    I work in a 24-bed ICU. We don't have a bed 13, it just skips from 12 to 14! I never say the Q word and never bring a book because that is a surefire way of guaranteeing a hellacious night. The other night at shift change I was saying how I like working Sunday nights because they are so slow. I caught myself midsentence and realized what I was saying but it was too late. That Sunday was the worst night I've ever had since working at this hospital!
  7. by   IR5676
    We also NEVER use the "Q" word, and woe to anyone from the previous shift that jinxes us!

    Resident's (LTC) go either by 3's or 5's, and if they were in the hospital, they don't count.

    Aresident that is approaching death, (yes, I know this is morbid) will have their ears fold or their nose shift to one side, or both.

    The new moon is worse than the full moon.

    As I said, LTC people seem morbid, but it's more truth than superstition.
  8. by   semstr
    OK, we never use the Q-word (here it is a R-word)

    I was taught to look at the earlobes too and it is always correct!

    Then when old people start picking up crumbs and other imaginable little things from their blankets, their eternal journey will start very soon.

    Don't bring something special to eat for your colleagues during a nightshift, give it to the homeless on your way to work, you won't be able to eat it anyway!

    And finally never say, I haven't been sick for a long time! Or for that matter, mmmm, my last visit at the dentist wasn't that bad!!!

    Take care, Renee
  9. by   newgirl
    If you work in the Emergency Room you know that the surest way to help a very ill patient on to the next life is to send them to the CT scanner... also the number of staff members available and working on a certain night relates indirectly to how busy the night will be...if you are OVER staffed you will have a slowwwww night..if you are understaffed you are in for a night from hell!!
  10. by   newgirl
    Ok this isnt really a superstition..its the truth..IN the ER the patients that come in screaming the loudest and trying to get a head of everyone else turn out to have the LEAST life-threatening illnesses....for instance the man who almost kicked down the ER door because his daughter (15) burnt her tongue on pizza...and after being sent to the waiting room, the patient who was in an SVT (who had yet to be triaged) was the one calming the man down ..sheesh
  11. by   Dyno
    What a superstitious lot we are...
    I work on a cardiac surgical ward & we have a communication book to put the names of pts we have identified that might require follow-up and/or assistance on d/c. If I identify a pt pre-op , I NEVER put their name in the book until they are back safely on the ward 24 hrs later...or else I feel we won't see them again.

    Why is it whenever you go to morning tea or lunch YOUR infusion bag ALWAYS runs out, even when you were sure their was enough in it until you got back? Hence, I change the bag before I go..just in case.
  12. by   CATHYW
    So true, new girl, so true! I used to swear people were out in the parking lot, waiting to see if we were busy-if we were, they, and all of their friends, came to join the party!
  13. by   Terrie
    We don't use the Q word or the S word and we never say I need to get out of here on time.
    We also have a nurse is ER who calls them in , she is a beacon for our doors are open.
    I need to try turning on the lights and zeroing the bed.

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