Who Has the Most Input With Multiple Interviews?

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    I graduated in May 2013 and I'm still looking for my first RN job. I've had a good number of interviews, but have not had any offers so far. I've noticed that if it's not a new grad program, a lot of hospitals will use 3 interviews - one with a unit manager, one with HR, and one with a panel of nurses.

    I interviewed with a hospital back in December, but only completed the manager interview. She's the first person to show me some real interest, and I think I'd have the job if her interview was the only one. I have the HR and the nurse panel interview coming up, and I'm getting pretty nervous. This is my last opportunity for now, until something else comes up, so I'm really hoping this will be the one that will work out.

    In this kind of interview format, who has the most input? If something goes wrong with the HR or panel interviews and they don't think I should be offered a job, would the manager have the final decision, or would someone else? I'm trying to stay positive that it will all go well, but it would be great to have a better understanding of the process/reasoning behind why interviews are done this way (other than offering differing perspectives/opinions on a candidate). Thanks in advance!
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    At the hospital I worked at the peer interview was the most crucial. If they graded you low then you didn't get hired. HR asked the same ridiculous personality questions. The managers were somewhat a formality. After I was hired and started sitting on the peer interview, my manager told me that the interview was the make or break point. If the nurses voted no then you weren't hired.
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    In most places, the manager has the authority to make the final decision ... but few managers will hire someone that the rest of the staff doesn't want to work with. That would only cuase tension within the team, and the manager won't want that. So when you are interviewing with the staff, remember to project an image of someone they will want to work with.
    HouTx likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from llg
    In most places, the manager has the authority to make the final decision ... but few managers will hire someone that the rest of the staff doesn't want to work with. That would only cuase tension within the team, and the manager won't want that. So when you are interviewing with the staff, remember to project an image of someone they will want to work with.
    My favorite interviewee

    Us: why do you want to work in the CCU?

    Her: well I really want to work in plastic surgery but they don't have that here.

    She was not hired.
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    Thank you so much for all of your replies! It makes sense that the panel interview would be most important, even if the manager has the final decision.

    If you are on a panel, what makes you want to work with someone? Obviously someone who works well with a team and has strong motivation to work in that unit are two major parts of it, I would think...but is there anything else you can think of?

    I don't have a lot of past work experience (and none of it is medical, except for nursing school clinicals of course), so sometimes I think that really has a negative impact on some of my answers.

    Wow manusko, I can't believe someone would say something like that in an interview...I would never give an answer like that! Understandable that she wasn't hired.
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    Quote from UCAFblue
    Thank you so much for all of your replies! It makes sense that the panel interview would be most important, even if the manager has the final decision. If you are on a panel, what makes you want to work with someone? Obviously someone who works well with a team and has strong motivation to work in that unit are two major parts of it, I would think...but is there anything else you can think of? I don't have a lot of past work experience (and none of it is medical, except for nursing school clinicals of course), so sometimes I think that really has a negative impact on some of my answers. Wow manusko, I can't believe someone would say something like that in an interview...I would never give an answer like that! Understandable that she wasn't hired.
    Be honest and try not to impress too much. One guy told us how he would use Maslows heigharcy of needs to decide which pt you see first. Seemed a little showy and did not impress my fellow panel members. Tell them why you want to work I their unit.


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