Masters in nursing education

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    I am considering a masters in nursing education. I think I would like to teach nursing and I am wondering if a degree in nursing education would be better than a generic MSN. The nurse educator track teaches how to develop a curriculum, teaching adult learners, etc. My thought is if I'm going to teach I should learn how to do it. Anyone have any advice?
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    I have my Master's in Nursing Education--- I think it has been very beneficial to me. Unless we make a conscious effort [i.e., through education], we tend to teach the way we were taught... which may or may not be a good thing.
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    Originally posted by LuvsOB
    I am considering a masters in nursing education. I think I would like to teach nursing and I am wondering if a degree in nursing education would be better than a generic MSN. The nurse educator track teaches how to develop a curriculum, teaching adult learners, etc. My thought is if I'm going to teach I should learn how to do it. Anyone have any advice?
    I think this is very positive. BSN and MSN programs generally do not focus on education yet get the jobs in in-service education and clinical nursing education. My BS was in education rather than a BSN and it eventually changed my career path for the better. Good luck. I am glad to see that MSN programs are now recognizing the value of courses in teaching and education.
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    Thanks for the replies.
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    To be approved as a full instructor in most states by the Board of Reg. Nursing you will need an MSN. Most MSN will offer final year options, including education. Not much, but a start.

    It is laudable you wish to be appropriately prepared to teach; so many instructors are appalling teachers (learning facilitators).

    It is possible to pick up courses in education theory (and practice) at local colleges. Even grade school teaching prep. helps with educational background. Like Tim, I really value my teaching degree.

    But you do need that MSN. Have you looked at the MSN online from CSUDH?
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    LuvsOb:

    Your original post did not say whether or not you have any experience teaching. If I were you, I would try to find some experiences teaching to see how you like it. For example, volunteer to work with students who come to your floor ... offer to orient them to your unit ... work with new employees ... etc.

    Some people think they will like teaching because they imagine only the positive aspects of the role. Then hate it once they face the day-to-day realities of it. Others try it and love it.

    Also, you might want to talk with people in your area who are knowledgable about the job market in your town. While there is a national shortage of instructors, the situation might not be what you would prefer in your particular geographic region. You might not have as many choices as you would like ... or the salary might not be as good as you expect, etc. There are reasons for the national shortage of nursing instructors. Be sure you know what you are getting into.

    Finally ... be sure to examine all types of teaching. When you think "teaching" a lot of people immediately think of teaching beginner-level students, working for a nursing school. However, there are also career opportunities in staff development in whiich you teach existing nurses ... and in public health education. There are lots of places and people to teach.

    Good luck,
    llg


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