Adjunct Faculty a.k.a. 'Academic Sharecroppers' - page 2

'Academic sharecropper' is a label that is usually applied to adjunct faculty members due to their status in the educational system and the backbreaking nature of their employment situations. Adjunct... Read More

  1. Visit  Tragically Hip profile page
    2
    The Ph.D. Now Comes With Food Stamps, The Chroincle of Higher Education, 6 May 2012

    A few years ago an adjunct English instructor wrote a great essay on how hard it is to survive financially on the pay colleges offered, even given the large number of classes he taught. I'll try to find the article.
    KimberlyRN89 and TheCommuter like this.
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  3. Visit  Chisca profile page
    3
    Which really begs the question why is higher education so expensive? An undergraduate microbiology course I took 5 years ago at University of Memphis was 1300 dollars in tuition. There were 100 students in the class. The University raked in over 100 thousand dollars for this one course and it sure didn't go to the adjunct professor who taught the class. It didn't go for the buildings, which are over 50 years old or the crappy wooden desks we had to sit in.
    SHGR, KimberlyRN89, and TheCommuter like this.
  4. Visit  brandy1017 profile page
    0
    It's too bad your friend can't get a job in the public school system say high school, as I'm sure the pay would be better than she's getting now plus the benefits are excellent. Wouldn't that be an easier path to take and quicker and still be able to teach vs changing careers entirely like going into nursing?
  5. Visit  mookyjoe profile page
    1
    I am new faculty for a PN program and my job is too assist in teaching 4 basic nursing skills, and instead of handing me 4 pages of paper on how and what they expect to be taught, they handed me a fundamentals nursing book. That was a little rude since I have no intention of reading a entry level book again, and two, they know I go to school full-time AND work a regular job. So yes, it's true, the support is talked about, but there is little to really explain what the expectations are and how they expect things to be taught. In any respect, I apologize to students for confusion and just explain that since I'm new to the school, I am not aware of their ways in doing things. It's like saying toma-ta or tomato...same thing, but not to everyone.
    June59 likes this.
  6. Visit  JBudd profile page
    1
    I must be one of the fortunate ones. Yes, my parttime pay is extremely poor (fully a third less than I make at bedside with just the BSN). But I don't really want to do any more clinical hours than I do, and I really enjoy teaching. So, I teach one day a week, plus the grading stuff at home. But I do that in a comfy chair with a good movie running in the background.

    My director and my level lead treat me very well; I have excellent support and feel valued.

    Our community college has just lost a goodly amount of state funding (as have all the schools). Yes, I resent being paid at the same level as all adjunct faculty (who do not have to have masters degrees) but it is across the board; I am not being singled out. I get my bennies from my clinical job, which I also enjoy doing.
    SHGR likes this.
  7. Visit  2407 profile page
    0
    Quote from mookyjoe
    I am new faculty for a PN program and my job is too assist in teaching 4 basic nursing skills, and instead of handing me 4 pages of paper on how and what they expect to be taught, they handed me a fundamentals nursing book. That was a little rude since I have no intention of reading a entry level book again, and two, they know I go to school full-time AND work a regular job. So yes, it's true, the support is talked about, but there is little to really explain what the expectations are and how they expect things to be taught. In any respect, I apologize to students for confusion and just explain that since I'm new to the school, I am not aware of their ways in doing things. It's like saying toma-ta or tomato...same thing, but not to everyone.
    How in the world they thought you must read and then pick those 4 skills off of the thick fundamental book? I was considering teaching some clinicals for my local colleges since I enjoy precepting. They keep on saying, "there are not enough instructors"! Yes, if you don't pay them or help them ease into their role!. These classes are way higher now then 8 yrs ago (during my nursing degree time).
  8. Visit  lotlie profile page
    1
    This is an old thread, but I think its really helpful. I am wondering if there is any difference in the outlook for nursing faculty. I read elsewhere that tenured positions are going away overall. But, is that also true for nurses? With all the talk of the need for nurse educators, it would seem there would be some incentive. Its deflating to think that after all the hard work and cost of graduate school, there may not be a reasonable full time position in the future.
    June59 likes this.
  9. Visit  JemJ profile page
    0
    Hi!
    I've just finished reading this thread with great interest. I will start my MSN in education this fall and finish in 2.5 yrs (part time program). I'm now feeling scared, bc it seems as though it will not only be hard to get hired full time (as opposed to adjunt) with only a Masters (and nearly 10 years at the bedside) but also that the pay will be poor. I love teaching and I know I don't want to do full time bedside care for the rest of my life. Can anyone give me actual salaries/approximate guesses as to what to expect for a wage as (I suppose) an adjunct nursing professor?
    Thank you!!
    J
  10. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    0
    Quote from JemJ
    Can anyone give me actual salaries/approximate guesses as to what to expect for a wage as (I suppose) an adjunct nursing professor?
    The local community college district in the area where I live pays adjunct faculty in the ballpark range of about $2,000 per class per semester.
  11. Visit  llg profile page
    1
    I am an adjunct at a public university where I teach 1 class per year -- a blended class that involves classroom, videostreaming, and online components. (I get a little bonus for the extra technology involved.) It's a full semester long and I got $4600 last year for teaching it. But I have a PhD, am listed as the "course coordinator" for the course, and I think that may add a little to my compensation, too.

    I haven't heard officially yet that I'll be teaching it again this fall. That's another thing I don't like about being an adjunct. It's like being a "PRN" staff nurses. If they don't need you at the last minute, you suddenly don't have a job.
    SHGR likes this.
  12. Visit  canchaser profile page
    0
    I just accepted an adjunct clinical teaching position. I'll have 8 senior students who are expected to take 2 pts a piece.. With one or 2 students floating off the unit to ICU. Kind of scares me to think ill be over 12 pts. Is that safe? Passing meds to 12 pts, 12 assessments? It pays $5400 for one day a week clinical. I've never done this before but I need a side job with some consistency in pay as my PRN job keeps canceling me.
  13. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    Quote from canchaser
    I just accepted an adjunct clinical teaching position. I'll have 8 senior students who are expected to take 2 pts a piece.. With one or 2 students floating off the unit to ICU. Kind of scares me to think ill be over 12 pts. Is that safe? Passing meds to 12 pts, 12 assessments? It pays $5400 for one day a week clinical. I've never done this before but I need a side job with some consistency in pay as my PRN job keeps canceling me.
    No, I don't think that is safe. That's one reason why many instructors don't have all students give meds, etc. They just can't safely supervise the care of that many patients and be at that many bedsides for so many meds, treatments, etc.

    It's also one reason it is so hard for schools to find/retain good clinical instructors.

    It's also one reason that so many students graduate so unready for the real world of nursing. Their instructors are spread too thin and under-paid.

    It's also one reasonf or the tension that often exists between schools and the local hospitals.

    Good luck to you.
  14. Visit  SGroRN87 profile page
    0
    Just accepted a full-time position at a community college teaching first year ADN students... $40k for a 9-month contract... This is after getting my foot in the door adjunct at 4 different schools after the past 2 years... It takes time, patience, and persistence... The pay is crappy but it's summers off... And I'm planning on having babies soon!


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