Nursing on own terms

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    I have been accepted to nursing school in the fall. This is a career change (although I haven't worked in quite awhile. My question is this. I have a great life-style. I am able to stay home with my three kids and we travel alot. Money isn't an issue. I have been interested in nursing, volunteered in a hospital and loved the pace and the environment. I think I will be satisfied with the job, but am worried about losing the freedom that I have now. Is it possible to find work that allows one to work say, one shift per week? Are there satisfying volunteer opportunities if one decided to use their skills in that capacity? I live in a major metro area. Any insights appreciated.
  2. 7 Comments so far...

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    There are casual positions that allow nurses to work very little (as little as one shift a month where I have worked). The only thing is, if you are applying for a casual job as a new grad, they will probably not train you for a specialty area so it's gonna mean med-surg.
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    [QUOTE=lgreen]I have been accepted to nursing school in the fall. This is a career change (although I haven't worked in quite awhile. My question is this. I have a great life-style. I am able to stay home with my three kids and we travel alot. Money isn't an issue. I have been interested in nursing, volunteered in a hospital and loved the pace and the environment. I think I will be satisfied with the job, but am worried about losing the freedom that I have now. Is it possible to find work that allows one to work say, one shift per week? Are there satisfying volunteer opportunities if one decided to use their skills in that cap
    acity? I
    ive in a major metro area. Any insights appreciated.[/QU

    When you first graduate for the first year out of school I would recommend
    working at least part-time. Once you feel comfortable working independently
    as a nurse and have your skills down, then you can work prn with confidence.
    Employers love prn nurses because they usually do not pay for benefits or
    bonus pay. Good luck with school and your career.
  5. 0
    I would also recommend working several days a week when you first graduate. Nursing school does not really teach you how to be a nurse. You will need experience for that.

    I volunteered as a Disaster Relief Nurse for The Red Cross shortly after 9/11. They assigned me work a local disaster situaton near where I lived.

    I enjoyed that experience very much.
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    I would agree with the above posters who say it's best to work a regular schedule for the experience. It's v. important. I'm a year out of school, working part time (1/2 time) in an ED and the confidence and skill I gain every day is more important than money.

    There are lots of volunteer opportunities; I volunteer and sometimes even get paid to work for a respite care house for medically fragile children. It's near Chicago. I don't like peds and as an ER nurse that's a big problem but one I have to overcome. This is my way of doing so. PM for any other information you might want about this.

    Good luck.
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    In nursing you can work as much or as little as you want. You can, indeed, work on your own terms. Good luck.
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    I agree with all of the above posts. If you only do one shift a week straight after graduating you will be distrusted and the object of jealous envy because it sounds like you don't really need the job, that you are doing it to keep yourself busy. Nurses who struggle through uni/school whilst they are supporting children (solo) would potentially regard you with contempt. Of course it depends on what kind of job you want to do.
    Secondly, if you don't really (an assumption) to work do you have the stamina to hack it?

    I am not trying to come down on you, I am just trying to open your eyes to potential difficulties.

    Good luck with whatever you choose to do.
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    I agree with Farkinott. I'm an LPN, went PRN after working a year in telemetry. I love the whole PRN thing...as little or as much work as I want. But, I do get a lot of crap from fulltime nurses and management. Comments such as "must be nice..." or "I don't want to hear how busy you are..." are common. I just remind them I've sacrificed a new car, condo at the beach, whatever to be a Mom to my children. I get tired of apologizing for not having to work fulltime, but wouldn't change a thing!


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