Im going to school for lpn. Is it worth it or not? - page 3

I'm 20 yrs old with 2 kids. I'm a cna now but the job is too much and pay horrible. I was planning to get the lpn and then take the bridge test for the RN. Also, is porter and Chester a good school... Read More

  1. Visit  lmburton profile page
    0
    Quote from jlopez92
    I'm 20 yrs old with 2 kids. I'm a cna now but the job is too much and pay horrible. I was planning to get the lpn and then take the bridge test for the RN. Also, is porter and Chester a good school for lpn?
    your plan is pretty sound. If you going to do the LPN route. Go work for a facility that will pay for you to go to get your RN so that you wont have that much loan cost. I am a CNA and I understand. if the cost of school is not a factor, then do the 2 yr program and then work for a facility that will pay you to get your BSN
  2. Visit  Vegan_RN profile page
    0
    I think a lot depends upon your situation. I was in an abusive home and needed an education that would get me out and in my own apartment as quickly as possible. I became an LPN and got a good job in dialysis, and immediately began taking my prereqs for my RN. Going to school to become and RN and working full time was the most difficult thing I've ever done in my life, but it was very well worth it. The pay difference between and LPN and an RN is incredible.
  3. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    1
    It does depend on your life situation. PLEASE do you due diligence-depending on your state, find out your job market-whether they are utilizing LPNs, etc. As a former LPN ( LOVED it!!!) the pay ranges from 15-19 starting out...you don't make 25-30 UNLESS you have years of experience or doing agency work ( where hours ARE NOT always guaranteed) In the Philadelphia, PA area, I made 23 dollars an hour base, 28 differential, and 32-35 on weekends at a rehab hospital. Home care I made 26, and pediatric medical daycare 22/hr, so it's varied, and that's with YEARS experience. As a new grad RN, base pay ranges 25-35 depending in facility. But it is a HUGE difference in pay from LPN to BSN. I saw a 200 dollar increase as soon as my job grandfathered me in after I was licensed. I also have TWO loans to pay back for BOTH nursing schools, it looks like a second MORTGAGE for me. So keep that in perspective-nursing school is NOT cheap, and your education is an investment...I worked as a CNA for 4 years before obtaining my license as an LPN, and seven as an LPN before being licensed as a RN this June...my experiences are bittersweet, but that experience helped me get out of my situation and made be a better nurse each time. Your youth and you desire to provide a better life for you and your child is adding to the anxiousness...don't let that get in the way if making the appropriate life plans. Stay determined, weight ALL (and I do mean ALL) possible options before making a plan. Good luck, and hang in there...you current path, your spirit and a little bit of life will lead you to the destination that you want. Good Luck!
    Vegan_RN likes this.
  4. Visit  Anoetos profile page
    0
    I am sure it's different everywhere but here in Detroit LPNs are having a very hard time of it. My hospital recently told all the LPNs (not that there were a LOT of them) that they had to take a pay cut and be demoted to nurse techs (losing about $4/hr and not being able to pass meds) or look for work elsewhere.

    It seems like the only places that hire LPNs are ECFs and I am not sure the frequency they do so, from what I have seen a lot of places have one RN and a bunch of aids doing pretty much everything. It's probably cheaper.

    As with everything, check your market.
  5. Visit  Ednach profile page
    0
    You are so young even if you go through LPN first you still have time to go back and start RN program. I have just started my pre reqs this year, I'm over 30 and my oldest just turned 13. At least you are already getting started.
  6. Visit  Anoetos profile page
    0
    If you have to/want to go LPN, go LPN. If your goal is RN, do that if you can. It's worth the extra work and headache.
  7. Visit  Streamline2010 profile page
    0
    RN is usually 24 months for just the nursing courses, but it's 6 semesters of nursing, not 4, because you have two summer terms. Only the accelerated BSN programs are shorter, like 15-18 months. Or diploma RN schools, those that require you to do all of the non-nursing college courses before you start, and then the nursing part might be just 16-18 months.

    Some community colleges offer a LPN program that directly transfers to their associate degree RN degree.

    With Magnet hospitals and the Affordable Health Care Act, I believe all nurses who work in hospitals are to be BS RNs. So most hospitals are phasing out or sometimes abruptly eliminating the LPNs. And giving the diploma and associate degree RNs a deadline by which they must become BS RN or lose their jobs.

    In rural PA, there are plenty of LPN jobs. The starting pay is about $15/hr. And LPNs are team leaders in nursing homes, not usually working in hospitals. There are some LPN school nurses and doctor's office LPNs, but their pay is so low, like $12-$13 /hour in some cases. In Allegheny and Washington counties of PA, LPNs at nursing homes are paid $18-$20/hour. The CNAs at The Washington Hospital were getting $15/hour but I don't know how much longer that will last, with all of the penny-pinching going on there.
  8. Visit  jlopez92 profile page
    0
    Quote from Streamline2010
    RN is usually 24 months for just the nursing courses, but it's 6 semesters of nursing, not 4, because you have two summer terms. Only the accelerated BSN programs are shorter, like 15-18 months. Or diploma RN schools, those that require you to do all of the non-nursing college courses before you start, and then the nursing part might be just 16-18 months.

    Some community colleges offer a LPN program that directly transfers to their associate degree RN degree.

    With Magnet hospitals and the Affordable Health Care Act, I believe all nurses who work in hospitals are to be BS RNs. So most hospitals are phasing out or sometimes abruptly eliminating the LPNs. And giving the diploma and associate degree RNs a deadline by which they must become BS RN or lose their jobs.

    In rural PA, there are plenty of LPN jobs. The starting pay is about $15/hr. And LPNs are team leaders in nursing homes, not usually working in hospitals. There are some LPN school nurses and doctor's office LPNs, but their pay is so low, like $12-$13 /hour in some cases. In Allegheny and Washington counties of PA, LPNs at nursing homes are paid $18-$20/hour. The CNAs at The Washington Hospital were getting $15/hour but I don't know how much longer that will last, with all of the penny-pinching going on there.
    I live in Connecticut I know the starting pay of lpns is in the $20s. I'm trying to research it as much as I can! I don't want to waste my money if its not worth it. Honestly though even if I get $18 an hour it's much better than what I get now.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close