I hate nursing!!

  1. I'm a fairly new nurse still. I have 5 months of experience. I work on a med/surg telemetry floor, and I absolutely hate it. It makes me not like nursing. I'm not sure if it's just the floor or if I don't like nursing all together. When I was in nursing school, I had doubts that I wanted to be a nurse, but I was half way through the program. My assistant dean of the college of nursing I went to convinced me to stay. I really thought I wanted to help people. But now I'm not feeling it anymore. I also have issues with anxiety that get in the way. But I'm currently working on that. I'm just wondering if there is anything I can do with my BSN that doesn't involve direct patient care? Maybe I would like that side of nursing.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Ruby Vee
    There are many nursing jobs that don't require patient contact, but they require several years of solid nursing experience. You aren't qualified for those jobs.

    The first year of nursing is miserable. There is so much to learn, and it seems that it must all be learned at once. Many new grads have never held a real job before and don't understand how workplace relationships work, and many don't understand that it's on them to fit into the workplace and not on the workplace to accomodate them. Plus all those nursing responsibilities -- it tends to be overwhelming. At five months, you're almost halfway through that first year, so you're getting there. It seems that around the time of your first anniversary in nursing, things start to "click" for a new nurse. Things fall into place and you begin to understand your place in the health care team. At that point, you may find yourself loving your job. Even if that isn't true, try to stay for two years until you become a competent nurse. At that point, you'll have a pretty solid idea what you do and do not like about your job and what to look for in future jobs.
  4. by   pmabraham
    Try to last out 12-months post orientation (not 12-months from hire date), and 24-months if able. I'm told with one to two years solid medsurg experience, a lot of doors can be opened for you.
  5. by   Mavrick
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    There are many nursing jobs that don't require patient contact, but they require several years of solid nursing experience. You aren't qualified for those jobs.

    The first year of nursing is miserable. There is so much to learn, and it seems that it must all be learned at once. Many new grads have never held a real job before and don't understand how workplace relationships work, and many don't understand that it's on them to fit into the workplace and not on the workplace to accommodate them. Plus all those nursing responsibilities -- it tends to be overwhelming. At five months, you're almost halfway through that first year, so you're getting there. It seems that around the time of your first anniversary in nursing, things start to "click" for a new nurse. Things fall into place and you begin to understand your place in the health care team. At that point, you may find yourself loving your job. Even if that isn't true, try to stay for two years until you become a competent nurse. At that point, you'll have a pretty solid idea what you do and do not like about your job and what to look for in future jobs.
    If this is true for you, we're done here.

    What the real problem is: Your expectations do not match your reality.

    You may have had the expectation that nursing is like what is portrayed on TV or what your friend's mother who is a CNA told you. The sooner you give that up the better your acceptance of your reality.

    I don't believe the current nursing curriculum adequately prepares you for the job of nursing. Nursing theories are all well and good but that book-learning is no preparation for the real world.

    When Nursing was more an apprenticeship, you got plenty of real world experience cuz they used you as slave labor in their hospitals. Now the pathetic experience you get in clinicals is just not cuttin' it. It's not wholly your fault, though, it's just that you are not anywhere near prepared to function as a real live nurse until your employer trains you and that takes time. So your first year of employment is more an extension of your nursing education. It's usually not very well organized but at least you paid for it.
  6. by   joseyjo
    I'm also a new nurse (7 months) on a Tele floor. About 2-3 months ago I could have written this post! Pretty much every shift I would all but have a panic attack as I took report and realized how much I was responsible for, or when I started to get behind passing meds, with assessments, etc. I cried pretty much every day, and started looking for jobs outside the hospital even though I know that changing jobs before year in my area can really affect my long-term employability.

    However, I got over it. I am able to handle my patient assignments now without panic attacks and when I get behind I just keep working until I get caught up. I am actually enjoying my job and remember why I became a nurse A couple of tips that helped me:

    1. When the panic starts to set in, take a short moment and gather yourself mentally and emotionally. Are your patients alive and stable? Then keep trucking. No? Then focus on the immediate need (patient stability). Assessments, routine meds, and even most scheduled IV meds can wait.

    2. Ask for help. Utilize your CN, fellow nurses, etc. On my floor people while often walk by and ask " How's it going? Need anything?" I used to just say, "Nope, I got it" (not wanting to look bad), or say "I'm behind but I'll catch up". Now if I am behind at all I'll say "I'm a little behind, are you busy?" I am amazed at how much help it is just to have someone pass 2100 meds to one patient. I return the favor by doing the same anytime I am caught up.

    3. Delegate. If you don't have one already, develop a good working relationship with your tech/CNAs. In the last few months I have worked hard at making sure my techs know they can rely on me to work hard, but that I need them to work too. If I am in a room and a patient needs something I do it. But I no longer answer call lights unless my tech is already in a room. I allow them to answer the lights so I can focus on charting, meds, etc.

    4. Focus on the part you DO like. I love patient care. I focus on that. If you don't, then focus on what you do like in the day (patho of the diseases, treatment protocols, whatever floats your boat).

    5. Be patent with yourself. It's a new job, in a new field. You need to make mistakes to learn your best way. Once you figure put your "groove" for the flow of the day it is SO much easier.

    Stick with it if you can. You became a nurse for a reason. After a year it's a lot easier/acceptable to change specialities/jobs.
  7. by   OrganizedChaos
    You're only 5 months into your job & nursing. You don't have your footing on either. Don't jump ship just yet, give nursing & your job at LEAST a year! It takes awhile to get into a routine. So just take a breath & know you will get the hang of things.

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