Few questions from the male newbie so to speak.

  1. Hello all,
    Id first like to begin by saying i know these threads float around 10 times a day but non of them answer my questions DIRECTLY with the other so here i am, i hope im not bothering anyone.

    I am in my first semester of pre-req's for the RN program and some pre-reqs will be able to transfer to BSN So after the next semester i will be ready to either start the RN clinical or transfer for BSN.. Whatever comes first.

    Heres where my questions begin, and yes i realize its VERY early in my academic career let alone actual nursing career but it never hurt anyone to plan ahead (and i like to plan alot). Just as some background i am 19 year old male and the ultimate goal in the head at the present moment would be to finish RN and get my BSN and then end there and work for a California DMH Hospital.

    But since the idea of nursing has come into my head (bout a year ago) ive been researching and researching and im learning MORE and MORE about the programs and careers beyond RN. Obviously i knew the jobs were there but i didnt know how to obtain them.. So in the recent month ive desided id like to become a CRNA. Finances arent an issue i am self employed and will be fine. Id like you all to run through my plan and let me know if there is any flaws in it..


    EDITED GOALS WITH NEW INFO:
    -1yr - Pre-Req's
    -2nd-4th year - RN Clinical
    -5th-6th year - BSN via Cal state domingez hills online while working as an RN for experience reasons. (Assume i will have been working for 2 years)
    -8th+ year - MSN/CRNA Program
    AfterWards become a CRNA =-)




    I realize obviously plans never go as planned, but id like to hear feedback on my plan.. Is there any problems with it ? Do i have it out of order? What would you recommend assuming i would like to end at CRNA? Is the ADN-MSN better than BSN-MSN? Please i am completely out of it, it seems that way anyway because of all the termanology, i find myself very confused on what is the right way to do things.. I dont want to fast-track i want normal speed, and i want to do my job correctly. Do i only need a BSN to get into CRNA program? Please fill me in on any info that i may be missing. Thankyou ever so much for reading and responding!


    --Verum
    Last edit by verumlike on Nov 10, '07
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from verumlike
    -1yr - Pre-Req's
    -2nd-4th year - RN Clinical
    -5th-6th year - BSN via Cal state domingez hills online while working as an RN for experience reasons. (Assume i will have been working for 2 years)
    -7th-10th year - CRNA Program
    -11th-14th year - Work on MSN while working as RN(While applying for CRNA position) or CRNA
    *** I don't know what nursing school is like in California but you seem to be on the slow boat to getting your RN. 4 years to get an associates degree in nursing? Here in Wisconsin it takes two years at some schools. If you are going to spent 4 years you might as well get your BSN and skip the associates RN. I wish you good luck getting into CRNA school but you realize it is EXTREMELY competitive to get in right? I suggest you work as an RN in the most high speed ICU you can get hired into while getting your RN to BSN and get very good grades. Forget about getting your MSN or working as an RN if you manage to get into CRNA school. CRNA school in a masters program. Many schools award the MSN with the CRNA. Many CRNA programs award a masters in nurse anesthesia, biology or even some who award masters in health care administration. If you graduate from CRNA school it would be silly to work as an RN as you will be in very high demand as a CRNA and the pay is much better. Besides you will likely have to work as a CRNA to pay off your loans. Also forget about ASN to MSN. You must have a bachelors degree to attend CRNA school. There is no way around it. All CRNA schools will accept a BSN. Some schools will allow a bachelors degree in something other than nursing but you must still be an RN in all cases. You must also have at least 1 year of work experience as an RN in an ICU.
    Requirements to attend CRNA school vary by school but all require these things:
    You must be a registered nurse.
    You must have a bachelors degree. (BSN preferred)
    You must have at least one year experience in an ICU as an RN (2-3 preferable)
    In general you seem to have a good game plan and I wish you the best of luck.
    Last edit by PMFB-RN on Nov 10, '07
  4. by   Tweety
    Sounds like some good goals.

    You probably are going to need one year of prereqs and then two years to get your Associates Degree.

    What I'm confused about is why get your Masters. The CRNA is a post-bachalarreate degree itself and there really isn't any need/use for any further degrees after that, unless you go for a doctorate so you can teach CRNA's.

    Good luck in whatever you do.
  5. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from Tweety
    Sounds like some good goals.

    You probably are going to need one year of prereqs and then two years to get your Associates Degree.

    What I'm confused about is why get your Masters. The CRNA is a post-bachalarreate degree itself and there really isn't any need/use for any further degrees after that, unless you go for a doctorate so you can teach CRNA's.

    Good luck in whatever you do.
    *** I was wondering that as well. All CRNA programs are masters programs. They have to be to be accredited. I find that most state university CRNA programs award the MSN and the small hospitals based programs award the masters in nurse anesthesia and some award different masters degrees like UW LaCrosse's programs that gives a masters in biology.
  6. by   verumlike
    Quote from Tweety
    Sounds like some good goals.

    You probably are going to need one year of prereqs and then two years to get your Associates Degree.

    What I'm confused about is why get your Masters. The CRNA is a post-bachalarreate degree itself and there really isn't any need/use for any further degrees after that, unless you go for a doctorate so you can teach CRNA's.

    Good luck in whatever you do.

    See these are things that i didnt know, i didnt know a CRNA program is a master degree. Its not that i didnt do the research but the only way to get blunt information is to ask as i did, i appreciate the feedback, above someone stated why is it going to take me 4 years for ADN, it is only a 2 year clinical ive just got LOTS of pre-req's.

    Question:

    Can i apply to an ICU with an ADN and no experience? I assume i can apply so i geuss the question is.. will i be hired? If not what do i need
  7. by   elizabells
    I'm not 100% I understand the chronology of your plan, but I say you should go straight for your BSN. You'll need it anyway, and the different focus of a bachelor's program vs associate's may better prepare you for graduate school.

    Please note: I'm NOT saying it'll make you a better nurse, because I am SO not getting involved in that debate, but that it may make you a better graduate student, because you'll have written more papers, etc.
    Last edit by Tweety on Nov 11, '07 : Reason: referenced deleted post
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from verumlike
    See these are things that i didnt know, i didnt know a CRNA program is a master degree. Its not that i didnt do the research but the only way to get blunt information is to ask as i did, i appreciate the feedback, above someone stated why is it going to take me 4 years for ADN, it is only a 2 year clinical ive just got LOTS of pre-req's.

    Question:

    Can i apply to an ICU with an ADN and no experience? I assume i can apply so i geuss the question is.. will i be hired? If not what do i need

    That's why we're here, to help you answer your questions.

    I agree with the poster above, it's going to take you 4 years to get a BSN and you say 4 years to get an ADN, then why not go for the BSN if you can, since that fits in with your long-term goal to be a CRNA?

    ADNs enjoy a wide variety of bedside opportunities in all areas of beginning nurses, including ICU. Just look for a hospital that accepts new grads to ICU and has a good orientation training program of at least 12 to 16 weeks for new grads.
  9. by   verumlike
    Quote from elizabells
    I'm not 100% I understand the chronology of your plan, but I say you should go straight for your BSN. You'll need it anyway, and the different focus of a bachelor's program vs associate's may better prepare you for graduate school.

    Please note: I'm NOT saying it'll make you a better nurse, because I am SO not getting involved in that debate, but that it may make you a better graduate student, because you'll have written more papers, etc.

    Im straight out of HS. I wont be accepted to anything but a community college. So my choices are slim atm.
  10. by   PMFB-RN
    Quote from verumlike
    Im straight out of HS. I wont be accepted to anything but a community college. So my choices are slim atm.
    *** I suggest you spend a couple years in community college with a plan to transfer into a BSN program rather that spend 4 years getting an ADN. People do that all the time. Ask your college counselor if there are any Cal State colleges with nursing programs that are not impacted and make plans to transfer there.
    Associates degree and Bachelors degree nurses are all RNs and equally qualified for entry level bedside positions including ICU. I am an RN with an associates degree and I went to work in an ICU directly out of nursing school.

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