Any INTJ personality nurses out there…I need help in choosing any advance nursing car - page 2

by BlackRN | 18,013 Views | 55 Comments

I have been a nurse for 4 years, different settings such as telemetry (2 years), ER (3 months), stepdown (6 months) , telemetry float (6 month), ICU staff (1 year), ICU float (3 months)…I know that it doesn’t look like a stable... Read More


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    BlackRN, I wish I could have an answer for you, but I don't. I'm also an INTJ. I have taken that test twice and received the same result. I believe we don't have a definitive suggestion for you because we are all in the same boat! LOL! It's difficult because I have the same difficulties as you with regard to trying to find a career that I am truly happy working.
    It takes me a while to warm up to new people, but once I do, I can be outgoing. Friends and coworkers have told me that their first impressions of me is anywhere from snobbish (due to being quiet) to unfriendly.
    I have had many careers in my life and have never had a problem or failure switching to a totally different field. I believe that if I could fail at it, then I would have some guidance with what I am suppose to do.

    I enjoy chaos and organizing it into some sort of system. I presently work in the ED and for the most part, enjoy it at this time. I am in my element when it is downright chaotic. My responsibility to my family prevents me from changing careers yet again. I plan to continue my education in nursing (for now) and will look for opportunities within this field. I'm sure there is somewhere where I'll fit in and feel fulfillment in my decision. I share your frustration and wonder if I'll ever find my niche in the workplace.
    If I ever figure it out, I'll be sure to tell you.

    I just wanted to let you know that you are not alone and that there are others like you. I didn't know that we are 1% of the population. Very interesting indeed.
    Best of luck to you.....and if YOU figure it out, please tell us!
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    fellow INTJ here. I have the same issues and really should have gone to a more sciency profession. Have a hard time dealing with people and warming up. So, I fake it for now. But I think CRNA might be a good route as there is tons to learn and you can always hide in OR and not have to socialize much.
    BlackRN likes this.
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    I'm on the same boat as you guys,,I'm an ISTJ, Architecture grad, worked in the field, got bored, took up nursing, first work was in dialysis, got bored of the routine, now working as floor nurse, and it's starting to become a routine..again..i dunno maybe it's just me
    BlackRN likes this.
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    Thanks for the link.....I was curious and so I took the test and it tells me I am type INFP. Says I would be best working in the humanities, specifially in psychology or counseling or teaching. Interesting as the majority of my nursing career I have worked in psych as I love it and think it is a population I am good with. And funny thing I am planning on applying for a masters program here for my Masters in Mental Health Counseling to get my LMHC! So I guess they hit it on the head. I just wish I could have known as when working in other areas of nursing I learned a lot and liked parts of it I was never really satisfied. So hey some validity to this test! lol
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    INTJ here. (Highly T, very highly J). I have been told umpteen times to go to med school, but that is just not in the cards for me. I have found two specialties that I love.

    1. Neurosurgery perioperative. I work in a teaching hospital, so I don't have much of an opportunity to first assist, but I do get to scrub and circulate. I have enjoyed learning all of the different procedures, and the surgeons have very high expectations. There's a lot to learn from both the surgical and anesthesia standpoint and since it is a teaching hospital, I have the change to teach the residents about the case and the surgeon's idiosyncrasies. It's also a less PC environment, which I really appreciate.

    Keep in mind, many nurses who come from a diverse background tend to be bored in OR. You need to find a team that will fully utilizes and challenge you.

    2. Nurse clinician. This may or may not require an advanced degree, depending on the doctor and institution. As a plastic surgery nurse clinician, I see and assess patients in clinic and give report to the MD. He often asks my opinion on the patient as a historian or of the symptoms, and encourages input with diagnosis. I do get to first assist in the OR, and do some procedures on my own (keeping scope of practice in mind). I dictate many of the clinic notes, which the MD reviews, amends, and signs off on them (same with letters to insurance companies, ratings, etc).

    There is also an administrative aspect to the nurse clinician, which includes scheduling (a little harder than it sounds!), keeping track of insurance info/precert/approval for patients, and developing a plan of care that fits the patient and their financial resources (ie therapy or surgery vs conservative management).
    chorkle likes this.
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    That's me, too! I didn't last long bedside. Kudos to those of you who have and continue to do so! I'm currently working in what would probably be considered health information management. One area I've been able to become involved with is clinical documentation in relation to coding and billing, this includes working with both computer information systems, understanding the clinical picture and applying quirky coding/billing guidelines. I love figuring things out and explaining it to others. I do miss patient contact to a degree. But I also am aware of how draining that kind of work is to me, despite how satisfying it can be. I definitely enjoy having a job where I can stop and look things up or put something aside for later as opposed to front-line patient care where you just have to plough on in the face of uncertainty, limited resources, physical and mental weariness. I've considered formally pursuing informatics. We'll see. I'd love to hear others' experiences!!
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    Thanks for the link! It turns out I'm an ENFJ personality.

    To be honest I thought this would be another bunk psychology test but I was really surprised how deadly accurate the results were!
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    I have an INTJ personality and go back and forth and become easily bored with things as well. Nursing is a task oriented field that is very repetitive. I have no clue what I am going to do. I suggest you shadow a CRNA prior to applying to deciding on whether or not it's what you really want to do. When I was in nursing school, I loved watching the epidurals being placed and just the entire process of it was exciting and the fact that with one simple mistake you can either help or harm a person got me going about the profession. However, I shadowed a CRNA in the OR and was bored out of my mind. It was intubation and playing around with the anesthesia machine. I found myself trying to peek behind the curtain to look at the surgery. I say I am going to shadow again in another hospital because where I work CRNAs don't do OB, just OR mainly. I consider myself a lost soul and have no clue what I am going to do in the future, but I know I am ready to start school so I can get the heck away from bedside.
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    I'm an INTJ on Myers-Briggs, although I don't place much faith in those sorts of tests. In the end, we are what we make of our opportunities and gifts; we aren't predetermined to succeed in one field and fail miserably in another simply due to a jumble of letters on a personality test.

    That said, you might consider health information management. It encompasses a broad area - everything from coding to health informatics and data analysis to designing and working with EHR systems to safeguarding the privacy of health care records. I understand your desire for new and ever-changing challenges - I tend to master things quickly and get bored once I do, so I need a field that I can use to transition into many different challenging areas (preferably those in which I don't have to work with lots of other people all the time). My personal interests lie in health informatics and healthcare data analysis, and it sounds as though you might have similar interests. Another thought for you is the role of a clinical documentation specialist - your skills as a nurse would be extremely valuable in that role, and your talents for organization, patterns, and analysis would stand you in good stead while working to master the nitty-gritty specifics of documentation requirements and coding-related duties. Or perhaps you would enjoy planning, designing, and implementing EHR systems. That sort of thing is very in-demand and will continue to grow as more and more facilities and practices adopt electronic health records. Believe me, there's a great deal of chaos to tame in the process of developing, implementing, and maintaining a complex EHR system. Your organizational skills and talents would certainly be put to good use, and your knowledge of the real-world demands the clinicians who will be using those systems face would make you a prized commodity!

    None of this may appeal to you in the least; however, at least you have some possibilities in front of you. If you're interested in healthcare data analysis and health informatics, try the website of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and look under the Certifications menu at the role of a certified healthcare data analyst (CHDA): www.ahima.org. The AHIMA and HIMSS websites (http://www.himss.org/ASP/index.asp) also have plenty of information about EHRs and the people who work to develop and maintain them. Here's a link to a description of the role of a clinical documentation specialist: http://www.psqh.com/online-articles/...ety-teams.html. You can also try the website of the Association for Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists for additional information: http://www.hcpro.com/acdis/

    I hope some of that information is useful to you. Feel free to PM me with questions if you like. Good luck to you in your search.
    paulschwinn, BlackRN, and NurseLay like this.
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    Thank you for this post. Most recently, I've looked at obtaining a master's in nurse informatics and then thought that maybe that was too specialized and decided to look at health information management. How long have you been in this field? I stopped looking at nursing informatics because while researching jobs it appeared that most were only temporary jobs and my fear is to get an advanced degree and then have to go back to the bedside once the job is no more. Any advice?

    Quote from TDCHIM
    I'm an INTJ on Myers-Briggs, although I don't place much faith in those sorts of tests. In the end, we are what we make of our opportunities and gifts; we aren't predetermined to succeed in one field and fail miserably in another simply due to a jumble of letters on a personality test.

    That said, you might consider health information management. It encompasses a broad area - everything from coding to health informatics and data analysis to designing and working with EHR systems to safeguarding the privacy of health care records. I understand your desire for new and ever-changing challenges - I tend to master things quickly and get bored once I do, so I need a field that I can use to transition into many different challenging areas (preferably those in which I don't have to work with lots of other people all the time). My personal interests lie in health informatics and healthcare data analysis, and it sounds as though you might have similar interests. Another thought for you is the role of a clinical documentation specialist - your skills as a nurse would be extremely valuable in that role, and your talents for organization, patterns, and analysis would stand you in good stead while working to master the nitty-gritty specifics of documentation requirements and coding-related duties. Or perhaps you would enjoy planning, designing, and implementing EHR systems. That sort of thing is very in-demand and will continue to grow as more and more facilities and practices adopt electronic health records. Believe me, there's a great deal of chaos to tame in the process of developing, implementing, and maintaining a complex EHR system. Your organizational skills and talents would certainly be put to good use, and your knowledge of the real-world demands the clinicians who will be using those systems face would make you a prized commodity!

    None of this may appeal to you in the least; however, at least you have some possibilities in front of you. If you're interested in healthcare data analysis and health informatics, try the website of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and look under the Certifications menu at the role of a certified healthcare data analyst (CHDA): www.ahima.org. The AHIMA and HIMSS websites (http://www.himss.org/ASP/index.asp) also have plenty of information about EHRs and the people who work to develop and maintain them. Here's a link to a description of the role of a clinical documentation specialist: http://www.psqh.com/online-articles/...ety-teams.html. You can also try the website of the Association for Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists for additional information: http://www.hcpro.com/acdis/

    I hope some of that information is useful to you. Feel free to PM me with questions if you like. Good luck to you in your search.


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