Any INTJ personality nurses out there...I need help in choosing any advance nursing car - page 2

I have been a nurse for 4 years, different settings such as telemetry (2 years), ER (3 months), stepdown (6 months) , telemetry float (6 month), ICU staff (1 year), ICU float (3 months)...I know... Read More

  1. Visit  mentalhealthRN profile page
    0
    Thanks for the link.....I was curious and so I took the test and it tells me I am type INFP. Says I would be best working in the humanities, specifially in psychology or counseling or teaching. Interesting as the majority of my nursing career I have worked in psych as I love it and think it is a population I am good with. And funny thing I am planning on applying for a masters program here for my Masters in Mental Health Counseling to get my LMHC! So I guess they hit it on the head. I just wish I could have known as when working in other areas of nursing I learned a lot and liked parts of it I was never really satisfied. So hey some validity to this test! lol
  2. Visit  PetiteOpRN profile page
    1
    INTJ here. (Highly T, very highly J). I have been told umpteen times to go to med school, but that is just not in the cards for me. I have found two specialties that I love.

    1. Neurosurgery perioperative. I work in a teaching hospital, so I don't have much of an opportunity to first assist, but I do get to scrub and circulate. I have enjoyed learning all of the different procedures, and the surgeons have very high expectations. There's a lot to learn from both the surgical and anesthesia standpoint and since it is a teaching hospital, I have the change to teach the residents about the case and the surgeon's idiosyncrasies. It's also a less PC environment, which I really appreciate.

    Keep in mind, many nurses who come from a diverse background tend to be bored in OR. You need to find a team that will fully utilizes and challenge you.

    2. Nurse clinician. This may or may not require an advanced degree, depending on the doctor and institution. As a plastic surgery nurse clinician, I see and assess patients in clinic and give report to the MD. He often asks my opinion on the patient as a historian or of the symptoms, and encourages input with diagnosis. I do get to first assist in the OR, and do some procedures on my own (keeping scope of practice in mind). I dictate many of the clinic notes, which the MD reviews, amends, and signs off on them (same with letters to insurance companies, ratings, etc).

    There is also an administrative aspect to the nurse clinician, which includes scheduling (a little harder than it sounds!), keeping track of insurance info/precert/approval for patients, and developing a plan of care that fits the patient and their financial resources (ie therapy or surgery vs conservative management).
    chorkle likes this.
  3. Visit  jjjoy profile page
    0
    That's me, too! I didn't last long bedside. Kudos to those of you who have and continue to do so! I'm currently working in what would probably be considered health information management. One area I've been able to become involved with is clinical documentation in relation to coding and billing, this includes working with both computer information systems, understanding the clinical picture and applying quirky coding/billing guidelines. I love figuring things out and explaining it to others. I do miss patient contact to a degree. But I also am aware of how draining that kind of work is to me, despite how satisfying it can be. I definitely enjoy having a job where I can stop and look things up or put something aside for later as opposed to front-line patient care where you just have to plough on in the face of uncertainty, limited resources, physical and mental weariness. I've considered formally pursuing informatics. We'll see. I'd love to hear others' experiences!!
  4. Visit  gymnut profile page
    0
    Thanks for the link! It turns out I'm an ENFJ personality.

    To be honest I thought this would be another bunk psychology test but I was really surprised how deadly accurate the results were!
  5. Visit  NurseLay profile page
    0
    I have an INTJ personality and go back and forth and become easily bored with things as well. Nursing is a task oriented field that is very repetitive. I have no clue what I am going to do. I suggest you shadow a CRNA prior to applying to deciding on whether or not it's what you really want to do. When I was in nursing school, I loved watching the epidurals being placed and just the entire process of it was exciting and the fact that with one simple mistake you can either help or harm a person got me going about the profession. However, I shadowed a CRNA in the OR and was bored out of my mind. It was intubation and playing around with the anesthesia machine. I found myself trying to peek behind the curtain to look at the surgery. I say I am going to shadow again in another hospital because where I work CRNAs don't do OB, just OR mainly. I consider myself a lost soul and have no clue what I am going to do in the future, but I know I am ready to start school so I can get the heck away from bedside.
  6. Visit  TDCHIM profile page
    3
    I'm an INTJ on Myers-Briggs, although I don't place much faith in those sorts of tests. In the end, we are what we make of our opportunities and gifts; we aren't predetermined to succeed in one field and fail miserably in another simply due to a jumble of letters on a personality test.

    That said, you might consider health information management. It encompasses a broad area - everything from coding to health informatics and data analysis to designing and working with EHR systems to safeguarding the privacy of health care records. I understand your desire for new and ever-changing challenges - I tend to master things quickly and get bored once I do, so I need a field that I can use to transition into many different challenging areas (preferably those in which I don't have to work with lots of other people all the time). My personal interests lie in health informatics and healthcare data analysis, and it sounds as though you might have similar interests. Another thought for you is the role of a clinical documentation specialist - your skills as a nurse would be extremely valuable in that role, and your talents for organization, patterns, and analysis would stand you in good stead while working to master the nitty-gritty specifics of documentation requirements and coding-related duties. Or perhaps you would enjoy planning, designing, and implementing EHR systems. That sort of thing is very in-demand and will continue to grow as more and more facilities and practices adopt electronic health records. Believe me, there's a great deal of chaos to tame in the process of developing, implementing, and maintaining a complex EHR system. Your organizational skills and talents would certainly be put to good use, and your knowledge of the real-world demands the clinicians who will be using those systems face would make you a prized commodity!

    None of this may appeal to you in the least; however, at least you have some possibilities in front of you. If you're interested in healthcare data analysis and health informatics, try the website of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and look under the Certifications menu at the role of a certified healthcare data analyst (CHDA): www.ahima.org. The AHIMA and HIMSS websites (http://www.himss.org/ASP/index.asp) also have plenty of information about EHRs and the people who work to develop and maintain them. Here's a link to a description of the role of a clinical documentation specialist: http://www.psqh.com/online-articles/...ety-teams.html. You can also try the website of the Association for Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists for additional information: http://www.hcpro.com/acdis/

    I hope some of that information is useful to you. Feel free to PM me with questions if you like. Good luck to you in your search.
    paulschwinn, BlackRN, and NurseLay like this.
  7. Visit  NurseLay profile page
    0
    Thank you for this post. Most recently, I've looked at obtaining a master's in nurse informatics and then thought that maybe that was too specialized and decided to look at health information management. How long have you been in this field? I stopped looking at nursing informatics because while researching jobs it appeared that most were only temporary jobs and my fear is to get an advanced degree and then have to go back to the bedside once the job is no more. Any advice?

    Quote from TDCHIM
    I'm an INTJ on Myers-Briggs, although I don't place much faith in those sorts of tests. In the end, we are what we make of our opportunities and gifts; we aren't predetermined to succeed in one field and fail miserably in another simply due to a jumble of letters on a personality test.

    That said, you might consider health information management. It encompasses a broad area - everything from coding to health informatics and data analysis to designing and working with EHR systems to safeguarding the privacy of health care records. I understand your desire for new and ever-changing challenges - I tend to master things quickly and get bored once I do, so I need a field that I can use to transition into many different challenging areas (preferably those in which I don't have to work with lots of other people all the time). My personal interests lie in health informatics and healthcare data analysis, and it sounds as though you might have similar interests. Another thought for you is the role of a clinical documentation specialist - your skills as a nurse would be extremely valuable in that role, and your talents for organization, patterns, and analysis would stand you in good stead while working to master the nitty-gritty specifics of documentation requirements and coding-related duties. Or perhaps you would enjoy planning, designing, and implementing EHR systems. That sort of thing is very in-demand and will continue to grow as more and more facilities and practices adopt electronic health records. Believe me, there's a great deal of chaos to tame in the process of developing, implementing, and maintaining a complex EHR system. Your organizational skills and talents would certainly be put to good use, and your knowledge of the real-world demands the clinicians who will be using those systems face would make you a prized commodity!

    None of this may appeal to you in the least; however, at least you have some possibilities in front of you. If you're interested in healthcare data analysis and health informatics, try the website of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and look under the Certifications menu at the role of a certified healthcare data analyst (CHDA): www.ahima.org. The AHIMA and HIMSS websites (http://www.himss.org/ASP/index.asp) also have plenty of information about EHRs and the people who work to develop and maintain them. Here's a link to a description of the role of a clinical documentation specialist: http://www.psqh.com/online-articles/...ety-teams.html. You can also try the website of the Association for Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists for additional information: http://www.hcpro.com/acdis/

    I hope some of that information is useful to you. Feel free to PM me with questions if you like. Good luck to you in your search.
  8. Visit  ImThatGuy profile page
    0
    I'm also an INTJ. I took the text last year and a few years before that and scored the same both times.

    I just reread the replies to the OP, and I love it. I too think that nursing isn't sciencey enough. I should've gone to medical school, and I was premed with my first degree. However, being that I get bored easily I wanted to move on and do other things. I was tired of school at the time so after an eight year hiatus I'm back finishing up the first of a four semeste BSN program.

    Given the options, I like the emergency department as an entry level clinical environment, because I l(ike another INTJ on here) was a paramedic. That was more of a hobby than anything else just to experience "medical stuff." I also enjoyed the extra income although I never spent any of it, lol.

    An administrative career, say hospital administration, would be interesting. I'm certain I'd enjoy that, at least for a while. I moved into an administrative position in my last career, and I really enjoyed all of that. Being a CRNA would be interesting. I was actually encouraged to do that when I was in paramedic school due to the interest I showed in airway management and patient monitoring. That also seems pretty intense, which appeals to me, since the level of physiology, patho, and pharm. involved is interesting. There aren't that many programs, and since I don't want to work in critical care I doubt I'll pursue that.

    I'd like to have more diagnostic knowledge so I'm thinking an MSN in FNP, whether I used it or not, would be appealing. Honestly, that with a graduate certificate in healthcare administration is what I think I'd like to do in the long run.
    Last edit by ImThatGuy on Nov 30, '10
  9. Visit  mfrancisco profile page
    3
    This thread is making me nervous. I am an INTJ also. Before I even clicked on the link to take the test, I knew I was an INTJ. I could tell just by reading all of your posts. I am wrapping up my first semester of nursing school.
  10. Visit  BlackRN profile page
    0
    Quote from TDCHIM
    I'm an INTJ on Myers-Briggs, although I don't place much faith in those sorts of tests. In the end, we are what we make of our opportunities and gifts; we aren't predetermined to succeed in one field and fail miserably in another simply due to a jumble of letters on a personality test.

    That said, you might consider health information management. It encompasses a broad area - everything from coding to health informatics and data analysis to designing and working with EHR systems to safeguarding the privacy of health care records. I understand your desire for new and ever-changing challenges - I tend to master things quickly and get bored once I do, so I need a field that I can use to transition into many different challenging areas (preferably those in which I don't have to work with lots of other people all the time). My personal interests lie in health informatics and healthcare data analysis, and it sounds as though you might have similar interests. Another thought for you is the role of a clinical documentation specialist - your skills as a nurse would be extremely valuable in that role, and your talents for organization, patterns, and analysis would stand you in good stead while working to master the nitty-gritty specifics of documentation requirements and coding-related duties. Or perhaps you would enjoy planning, designing, and implementing EHR systems. That sort of thing is very in-demand and will continue to grow as more and more facilities and practices adopt electronic health records. Believe me, there's a great deal of chaos to tame in the process of developing, implementing, and maintaining a complex EHR system. Your organizational skills and talents would certainly be put to good use, and your knowledge of the real-world demands the clinicians who will be using those systems face would make you a prized commodity!

    None of this may appeal to you in the least; however, at least you have some possibilities in front of you. If you're interested in healthcare data analysis and health informatics, try the website of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and look under the Certifications menu at the role of a certified healthcare data analyst (CHDA): www.ahima.org. The AHIMA and HIMSS websites (http://www.himss.org/ASP/index.asp) also have plenty of information about EHRs and the people who work to develop and maintain them. Here's a link to a description of the role of a clinical documentation specialist: http://www.psqh.com/online-articles/...ety-teams.html. You can also try the website of the Association for Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists for additional information: http://www.hcpro.com/acdis/

    I hope some of that information is useful to you. Feel free to PM me with questions if you like. Good luck to you in your search.
    Thanks so much...very informative and very interesting. I am defint. looking at your suggestions. They seem very interesting and challenging. You sure after reading all these replies that you do not believe in the Myer-Biggs personality categories???? In every reply, I saw myself, my struggles...
  11. Visit  BlackRN profile page
    1
    Thanks all for making me feel that I belong somewhere...But overall, I am greatful to have found nursing regardless. Because it allows me to move around without really affecting my financial situation. Imagine you chose a a boring career with no fluidity and you are an INTJ. OUCH. What a miserable life, I can imagine.
    student forever likes this.
  12. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    0
    Quote from mbarn08
    i am not judging you negatively by saying the following: nursing is not for you... you need to try medical school and become a doctor. your personality type is not a good fit for nursing. i know of your personality type and yes, some nurses with your personality type made the mistake of becoming nurses... like them, you will always be searching for the next big thing and never once be happy when you finally mastered a particular aspect of nursing care because nursing care is not that complicated after some experience; it is just hard work. also, nurses are not given the respect a person of your personality type needs to be happy.

    i read your entire post and i was not shocked that acute care np was suggested to you.. i was shocked you took the bait. in any case, you are correct... np in acute care will not be enough for you too especially since the job market is poor for acute care nps (icus and ers prefer to hire pas and some hospitals will not allow nps to accompany docs on the floors). thus, you will end up going for a doctorate in nursing to be accepted in the health care community. again, drop out and try med school. if not medical school, then go into business for yourself so that you are always challeneged to do more and be more.... gl!
    how are you qualified to make such an assessment?
  13. Visit  TDCHIM profile page
    1
    Quote from NurseLay
    Thank you for this post. Most recently, I've looked at obtaining a master's in nurse informatics and then thought that maybe that was too specialized and decided to look at health information management. How long have you been in this field? I stopped looking at nursing informatics because while researching jobs it appeared that most were only temporary jobs and my fear is to get an advanced degree and then have to go back to the bedside once the job is no more. Any advice?
    This one is for both you and the OP:

    HIM is a cool field because, like nursing, it has many different areas of specialization. It's also growing quite a bit because of the push to move health records to an electronic format. When that data is available in such a format rather than confined to traditional paper records, it can usually be searched, scanned for patterns, and analyzed far more easily. I'm in my 3rd year of my bachelor's program; after next year I'll sit for the RHIA (Registered Health Information Administrator) exam and eventually I'll pursue CHDA certification and an advanced (preferably terminal) degree in public health.

    Before I decided to move into this field, I did a fair amount of research and interviewed several people already working in the field. The consensus was that the upcoming deadlines for meaningful use of EHRs and the transition to ICD-10 were going to create a lot of need for well-trained new people in HIM, especially at the RHIA level and beyond. However, I would strongly encourage you to do your own research before making the move to this field. If possible, talk to a few people in the HIM department at your facility, including the manager or director. You can also research the work done by different organizations related to the HIM field. Personally, I find a lot of the work done by the people at AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) very cool, but that's just me.

    @OP: I don't put a lot of stock in personality tests like Myers-Briggs because people tend to see a lot of themselves in multiple descriptions. To me, they're a bit like the spirit readings of people who've "crossed over" into the great beyond - the people participating usually want to buy into what they're being told and can easily do so because many of the descriptions are vague enough to have multiple interpretations. Obviously, there are different sorts of personalities - I just don't buy boxing people into alphabet-soup categories. For the most part, I believe we succeed or fail based on how well we utilize our talents and skills, not on whether our personalities perfectly align with the fields we choose. But that doesn't mean you should believe what I do! That's just my personal opinion.
    flyingchange likes this.

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