How Can You Be A Nurse With No Clinical Background? - page 3

by All4NursingRN

9,928 Unique Views | 42 Comments

I find that odd. The foundation of nursing skill and ''critical thinking'' is having some experience with bedside care. I understand alot of new grads are running away from the bedside faster than ever, and alot of nurses are... Read More


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    I will be twenty-three going on twenty-four so that puts me two years behind. I am in my fourth year of college. I went directly from high school. I switched majors which put me a year behind. Then I got a horrible clinical instructor who bullied me and failed me three weeks before finishing my first year even though I had an A average...which put me behind another year.So even though I did everything right I was still screwed over. Thankfully, I received a better instructor who I clicked with.
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    Not to criticize your plans, but doesn't graduating at 23 with a BSN only put you a year behind other grads who would have gone straight to a traditional BSN program from high school? I get a sense that you already feel behind on life, but finishing a college degree by 23 isn't that bad.
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    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    I'm either going to directly go to NP school (part-time) while working at the bed side fulltime or work for one year fulltime then drop to part-time while going to school full-time for two years. By the time I'm get my NP license, I will have two-three years of bedside experience.

    I want to finish school before I have children. It is taking me longer to get my BSN than expected, and I really don't want to be in school, working AND raising kids at once. If I go straight through, I will be 26/27 years old by the time I'm finished (23 after graduating with a BSN). I don't want to be in my thirties and JUST starting a family (I would like three to five children) and I would like to be finished with having children by 35, leaving me with very little time to have those three, four (MAYBE five) children.

    I really have no choice BUT to go straight through, and I shouldn't be judged for it. Yes, if I were younger and didn't want as many children, I would take my time, but I'm not going to have children AND go to school AND work. It is too much for me.
    Wow, you have the kid thing all planned out . Life does not always work out the way we "plan" (literally for you) but I hope you have those five babies!
    WanderingSagehen likes this.
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    Quote from RN Sam
    Wow, you have the kid thing all planned out . Life does not always work out the way we "plan" (literally for you) but I hope you have those five babies!
    You don't think I already know this? Of course I do. I didn't expect to be in undergrad for so long, but life had other plans for me.
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    When you're mumblemumble years old, like me, and probably even sooner, those two years in your twenties will shrink into the insignificance they deserve. Move on and try not to think about it so much.
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    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    I will be twenty-three going on twenty-four so that puts me two years behind.
    *** Your not behind anything. I urge you to relax a little about this time line. I would hate to see you have a lot of stress about it. I am aquanted with a young nurse (I was her ICU night shift preceptor) who will be graduating from CRNA school in August 2013 at the age of 24 (actually the 2nd 24 year old advanced practice nurse I have known) after becoming an RN at age 18. I know plenty of others who did grad school at an older age with a family and things worked out just fine.
    ThePrincessBride and hiddencatRN like this.
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    Quote from GrnTea
    When you're mumblemumble years old, like me, and probably even sooner, those two years in your twenties will shrink into the insignificance they deserve. Move on and try not to think about it so much.
    I mean, in terms of fertility years, two years can be the difference between having that fourth kid or not (I want mine spaced out). If I were a guy with an unlimited amount of baby making years, I wouldn't be so stressed over it.

    But I guess it is all in perspective.
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    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Your not behind anything. I urge you to relax a little about this time line. I would hate to see you have a lot of stress about it. I am aquanted with a young nurse (I was her ICU night shift preceptor) who will be graduating from CRNA school in August 2013 at the age of 24 (actually the 2nd 24 year old advanced practice nurse I have known) after becoming an RN at age 18. I know plenty of others who did grad school at an older age with a family and things worked out just fine.
    That is impressive!

    It is definitely hard to not stress about it, especially when you go to a super intense and competitive nursing school where everyone and their mom wants to be a CRNA by 25 and you are almost 25 yourself.

    But I just don't want to be in grad school, AND working AND raising a family, you know? Way too much. I congratulate those who can juggle all that at once, but I couldn't do it.
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    I know that bedside nursing, and many years of experience make a better nurse, however, this is not true for all nurses. You'll find nurses with less experience who know more, and those with many years of experience that know many tips and tricks but lack nursing knowledge.....I strongly believe that a nurse with years of bedside experience will have an easier time in grad school, and will most likely be a better nurse practitioner ( faster). However, a new grad nurse who goes straight for DNP, will have an easier time in grad school because the content is fresh, test wise. But will suffer in clinicals, and will probably not be familiar with many pt conditions. It will take longer for a new nurse to adapt to a DNP role. Everyone is different and every knows strengths and weaknesses, they have their reasons for pursuing DNP at different times. Think about an MD, he spends so many years in school, yes they might not be as good for the first couple of years but they learn everyday and one day they master it! Same goes for those nurses with zero bedside experience, who went straight to grad school. People succeed at different times.
  9. 0
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    That is impressive!

    It is definitely hard to not stress about it, especially when you go to a super intense and competitive nursing school where everyone and their mom wants to be a CRNA by 25 and you are almost 25 yourself.

    But I just don't want to be in grad school, AND working AND raising a family, you know? Way too much. I congratulate those who can juggle all that at once, but I couldn't do it.
    *** Ah well don't worry about it. No way more than a tiny few of them can accomplish that. The bottle neck will be getting their ICU experience and ICU nurse managers hate hiring grads who want to accept months of expensive training only to leave the unit for CRNA school as soon as they become usefull. I have even know nurse managers to conact nursing instructors and vist Facebook pages to potential new grad hires to find out if they plan on just useing the ICU. Besides if getting into CRNA schoo ASAP was hose students primary goal they would have gone to an ADN program. Fastest way I have seen of geting into CRNA school is through the community collge, not a University.
  10. 0
    Well I could not get a job after my ADN program and passing the NCLEX, recession in the early to mid 1990's, so I went and finished my BSN and PHN and spent 3 months interviewing for any nursing job and managed to get hired as a school nurse. The only bedside clinical experience was in my nursing school rotations. Ironically I work and service the severe handicap population which includes colostomy bag changes, trach suctioning, urinary catherters, g-tube feedings, etc. Ironically my hospital experienced peers complain that they are rusty and can't do these tasks anymore. Funny but I can, why is that? So I took the "harder" students and only I know how to do these things? Soo much for clinical experience. It is a matter of critical thinking skills, common sense, and a work ethic in my opinion. Try to have a wider view on this. Yes there are folks that would fail in these situations but there is always someone who can do it.


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