Observant Jew Cannot Work Saturday Shifts - page 3

Dear Nurse Beth, I am a nurse with 4 years experience. I am also an observant Jew hence I observe the Sabbath. At my current job, I work every Sunday instead of alternating weekends (Saturday and... Read More

  1. by   Charkiyay
    As with all things with Judaism, I suggest consulting your rabbi, since those of us who are observant Jews know, halakhah (translation for non-Jews = Jewish law) is very complex. However, as you are also aware, life-saving and life-preserving activities are permitted on Shabbat (the Sabbath), but perhaps you could refrain from other activities which would not be shomer Shabbat (translation= not guarding the Sabbath) outside of your patient care duties.
  2. by   Charkiyay
    Quote from Mavrick
    Your reasons for being unable to fulfill the requirements of the job (religious or otherwise) do not matter. Employers are required to make reasonable accommodations for disabled employees, not re-model an entire hospital wing. In a 24/7/365 business, it is not reasonable to require someone else to consistently work a shift you choose not to work. Just re-write the arbitrary religious rules you choose to selectively follow to accommodate your personal snowflake situation. You are an unqualified employment candidate.

    Or.

    Stay at your current job. Keep looking for a job that is similar to your current schedule.

    Our Jewish "arbitrary rules" as you labeled them, are NOT arbitrary, and NOT subject to rewriting. Our law was given to us well over three millennia ago and informs every aspect of the observant Jew's life. To call the nurse's situation a "snowflake situation" shows tremendous disrespect and lack of cultural sensitivity. I sure hope you exercise more sensitivity with your patients.
  3. by   SallyRNCNOR
    Dear Nurse Beth:
    I feel that you dropped the ball on this one. According to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Any employer who has more than 50 employees must make every possible effort to accommodate that employees religious beliefs. The prospective employee who is an observant Jew could also make the accommodation to work every Christmas Eve and Christmas Day so long as she gets her religiious holidays (Rosh Hashonnah & Yom Kippur) as well. It is up to the employer if they want to hire this prospective employee, but to refuse to hire her because of her religious restrictions, would be a violation of the law and also discriminatory in nature.
  4. by   Oldmahubbard
    Interesting. While this makes wonderful sense on paper, in the real nursing world, working Christmas Day would hardly make up the difference for that entire year of Friday and Saturday nights.There would quickly be intense resentment.

    Even if administration allowed it, soon gossip and anti-Semitic sentiment would take over the unit. Nurses are notoriously petty and jealous about anyone who is perceived to have an "easier assignment", even if it is just for the shift. Forget about a permanently "easier" assignment!

    I have known nurses who had legitimate paperwork to show that they needed a fairly small ADA accommodation. Nothing that different from the usual duties, but anything that is seen as any type of an accommodation ( read "easier assignment") is akin to blood in the water for sharks.

    I had to get out of nursing, as I have said in many other posts, because of the petty mentality, but there you have it.
  5. by   Nurse Beth
    Quote from SallyRNCNOR
    Dear Nurse Beth:
    I feel that you dropped the ball on this one. According to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Any employer who has more than 50 employees must make every possible effort to accommodate that employees religious beliefs. The prospective employee who is an observant Jew could also make the accommodation to work every Christmas Eve and Christmas Day so long as she gets her religiious holidays (Rosh Hashonnah & Yom Kippur) as well. It is up to the employer if they want to hire this prospective employee, but to refuse to hire her because of her religious restrictions, would be a violation of the law and also discriminatory in nature.
    I understand, and no hospital would give that as a reason for not hiring.

    The law also says an employer must accommodate religious beliefs within reason and if does not cause the business unnecessary hardship.
    Last edit by Nurse Beth on Feb 14

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