Projected Supply, Demand and Shortages of Registered Nurses: 2000-2020

  1. using data on supply trends drawn from the 2000 national sample survey of registered nurses, supply and demand projections of registered nurses (rns) for the period 2000 through 2020 are the subject of this report released in july 2002. these new projections show that a shortage of fte registered nurses, previously projected to begin around 2007, was already evident in the year 2000.

    the report includes

    projections of rn supply and demand, both national and state-specific, for the years 2000 through 2020

    identification and discussion of the driving forces and trends underlying the projected supply and projected demand

    relevant charts, maps and tables, presented both in the body of the report and in an appendix.
    http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce...ct/default.htm
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  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   oramar
    That is the first time I have ever been to HRSA web site. Thanks for the link.
  4. by   margaretmary
    thanks karen for posting that link. the ana also has a link on their website. i printed out the study awhile back to read it at my leisure. i found this interesting tidbit on page 7 right above chart 7:

    declines in relative earnings:
    salaries are likely playing a role in the declining supply of rns. while actual earnings for rns increased steadily from 1983 through 2000, "real" earnings -- the amount available after adjusting for inflation -- have been relatively flat since 1991. thus, on average, rns have seen no increase in purchasing power over the last 9 years. (see chart 7) in contrast, the average salary for elementary school teachers has always been greater than that for rns and is growing at a faster pace. [2] in 1983, the average elementary school teacher earned about $4,400 more than the average rn; by 2000 this had grown to the point where elementary school teachers earned about $13,600 more. [3]

    it makes me pretty darn angry. can you believe it! i'll repeat it one more time. in 1983, the average elementary school teacher earned about $4,400 more than the average rn; by 2000 this had grown to the point where elementary school teachers earned about $13,600 more. [3]

    and they have better retirement benefits to boot!
    Last edit by margaretmary on Sep 13, '02

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