Calling Nurses Back to the Field - page 2

by NRSKarenRN Admin

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byramona salotti, rn, bs nursing spectrum masthead date june 16, 2003 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- we came from throughout the philadelphia area, 30 women who... Read More


  1. 2
    elprup- this is a wonderful find.

    I wish there were more posts to this to gain more insight into what we were thinking back then and compare the thoughts and experiences of what the different age groups of nurses are experiencing now- similarities, differences, new grads, older nurses, their specific accounts/ reasons for leaving nursing. Interesting - the few posts express the nursing powers that be were presenting "gimics" to lure experienced nurses back into the profession. From the few posts I conclude- conditions in the workplace have not improved but only gotton worse and it seems from the few posts, nursing managment back then were attempting to solve the problem(s) now they seem content to keep it that way- an apathy. It will be this apathy- an unwillingness to challenge or rock the status quo( the money managers(ceo's and all their fine men/women) that will be nursing greatest downfall. perhaps the fault does not lay with the staff nurse role but the mind set of those in nursing managment. If only there were some real solid leadership qualities in today's managers with the brash boldness and "dedication" to speak out against this fiscal focus as prioity#1.
    I do remember hearing back then that young staff nurses were hired to be nurse managers so the senior managment could "groom" them. The examples of what we are left with today- is not what the profession is about. I almost have to wonder if their wide eyed naiaveness was not exploited.
    elprup and lindarn like this.
  2. 2
    at this level, i agree with all previous post to a certain extend as i'm aware of all of your concerns, as a upper management nurse i saw the writing on the wall way before it occur, along with several of my colleagues. however, when we tried to rectified and confront administration they became deaf to our pleads leaving us to manage the load without any backup. needless to say, i witness at first hand several of my then colleagues throw in the towel and resigned as they venture into the unknown non-medical careers. furthermore, it is an easy way out to blame someone else when all the facts are unknown. therefore, an argument of this magnitude is ludicrous to try and make sense to those who were not in management during that time. certainly, i'm aware of certain types of management that all they care about is reaching those numbers, instead of their nursing staff work conditions. having said that, those like myself that are trying our best to overcome this cloud hovering over us, are simply overshadowed by those who are happy to see our defeat. unquestionably, when one brings complaints without a solution administration takes the defensive mechanism. with that said, it is up to us to reclaim our profession in bringing the nursing profession to a higher caliber standard for all nurses. lastly, it will take all of us pulling together if we want to regain what is rightfully ours, and take charge once again in what nursing is meant to be as we guide our profession into a successful future. in conclusion, i will quote a wise person that once wrote the following... " united we stand divide we fall"
    elprup and lindarn like this.
  3. 4
    Quote from RobinScottRN
    Nursing positions are a dime a dozen. Sometimes one must consider accepting a position at a lower pay or in an area not of one's particular area of interest. Most nurses are encouraged to seek a Med/Surg clinical position for at least one-two years. It is,then, usually easy to transition into a specialty. However, one has an obligation to appear satisfied while on duty, regardless of position. There are thousands of nurses vying for that perfect position and the experience is only one trait. Others include integrity, character, flexibility, and adaptability. One should perform an honest self-assessment and ask what ability is weak that employers are placing one in that second position. Identify the why and one can improve on the who.
    I don't think nursing jobs are a dime a dozen. There are multiple applicants for every position and hospital have hiring freezes.
    Has the Nursing Shortage Disappeared?

    It's that time of year again. Graduating nursing students are preparing to take the NCLEX and are looking for their first jobs. This year, many are finding those first jobs in short supply.

    Reports are rampant of new graduates being unable to find open positions in their specialty of choice, and even more shockingly, many are finding it tough to find any openings at all.
    These new RNs entered school with the promise that nursing is a recession-proof career. They were told the nursing shortage would guarantee them employment whenever and wherever they wanted.

    So what happened? Has the nursing shortage—that we've heard about incessantly for years—suddenly gone away?
    http://www.healthleadersmedia.com/co...sappeared.html
    The short term answer is clearly yes, although in the long term, unfortunately, the shortage will still be there. The recession has brought a temporary reprieve to the shortage. Nurses who were close to retirement have seen their 401(k) portfolios plummet and their potential retirement income decline. They are postponing retirement a few more years until the economy—and their portfolios—pick up.

    Many nurses have seen their spouses and partners lose their jobs and have increased their hours to make ends meet for their families. Some who left the profession to care for children or for other reasons have rejoined the workforce for similar reasons.
    In addition, many hospitals are not hiring. The recession brought hiring freezes to healthcare facilities across the country, and many are still in effect. Help wanted ads for healthcare professionals dropped by 18,400 listings in July, even as the overall economy saw a modest increase of 139,200 in online job listings.
    elprup, lindarn, nursel56, and 1 other like this.
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    I agree it is frustrating to find a job as a new grad. Everyday I am frustrated with having to explain to everyone why I don't have a job. The job market is tough as a new grad. You need experience ...just one year...but no one will give you that one year . If there is a new grad opening...you are competing with 800 people. Yes, 800. I called HR to ask a question and they like to tell you numbers. Last year they had 800 people apply. My concern is this..you get a job that's not in acute care in the mean time..and your goal is acute care...they don't count it as experience..your applying to the hospitals...hear nothing..a yr later and your not considered a new grad so that leaves me there! I'm scared! I have dreamed to work in the hospital...I love that setting...I love the environment. I work best in a fast pace environment . Its where I know I am suppose to be. I am not sure what to do..someone help? I'm scared if I don't find a job with in this yr. how can I get in?
    elprup and lindarn like this.
  5. 2
    In 2002, I spearheaded a march sponsored by Delaware County and Philadelphia County Nurses Association to educate public and media about the nursing shortage, increased funding for nursing programs , use of Advanced Practice nurses etc.

    Within 10 years went from shortage to surplus of new graduates in Philadelphia area. At the same time due to improved healthcare advances with shift to outpatient care and procedures, declining reimbursement force under performing facilites to close, hospitals to merge and shrink size resulting in less entry level hospital positions for new nurses, some expansion in Advanced Practice areas.

    We are now at the time where we are the victim of our own success.

    Associate and Diploma grads are finding themselves unemployed in my area as 4 major health systems have BSN minimum hiring
    for new grads. In my own health system, Managers were told they need to have Masters degree by 2017. The opportunities outside the hospital walls have significantly expanded but students expectation that they will work in a hospital has not changed. Many Associate programs do not provide education + experience in community health settings. Hospitals have cut costs by doing away with new grad programs along with some nurse recruiters due to surpluss.

    Thusly, another correction needs to be made regarding nursing profession + education. We are shooting ourselves in the foot by closing the door on entry level positions. The timing appears to be ripe for Nurse residency programs which help to transition new grads to experienced clinicians.
    elprup and lindarn like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from elprup
    Just found this thread. It is 2012, I graduated 2008 with my BSN, and have yet to land a coveted RN job. First one did not work out....they expected me to function as an experienced nurse with zero ezperience! Interviewed for Versant new grad position. Got to 2nd interview and then disqualified because they said I was no longer a new grad due to my few months of "experience". So I could not get a staff nurse position or a new grad position! And I had moved twice for those two jobs!!!! I tried LTC and hated hated it. Then took lower job at rural medical clinic and stayed for a year until I could not stand being utilized as an RN for such low pay. But now that I am back to applying for RN jobs I am fighting with my previous employer as to why they will not state they utilized me as a registered nurse! Because, now jobs still think I have zero experience, even though I have a year of clinic experience!!! I am soo frustrated with nursing and doing everything right (professional resume, BLS, ACLS, Suit, thank you notes, blah blah blah... But I am always their second choice because of my lack of acute care experience. I am so done. So frutrated! Now looking into a refresher course, even though I read and review nursing info almost every day. I never thought getting an RN position would be easy, but jesus, it is wicked hard if not impossible.

    Unfortunately I did not know the corner I was painting myself into either! Now that every area is a specialty. It's not easy to move from one to the other. After spending 13 years in the OR I decided I wanted to do something different.... 8 yrs later all I want to do is go back!!! Don't know how that's gonna happen.... but you never know what door may open tomorrow??! It's not like you forget everything you ever learned!
    elprup likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from gitanorn
    at this level, i agree with all previous post to a certain extend as i'm aware of all of your concerns, as a upper management nurse i saw the writing on the wall way before it occur, along with several of my colleagues. however, when we tried to rectified and confront administration they became deaf to our pleads leaving us to manage the load without any backup. needless to say, i witness at first hand several of my then colleagues throw in the towel and resigned as they venture into the unknown non-medical careers. furthermore, it is an easy way out to blame someone else when all the facts are unknown. therefore, an argument of this magnitude is ludicrous to try and make sense to those who were not in management during that time. certainly, i'm aware of certain types of management that all they care about is reaching those numbers, instead of their nursing staff work conditions. having said that, those like myself that are trying our best to overcome this cloud hovering over us, are simply overshadowed by those who are happy to see our defeat. unquestionably, when one brings complaints without a solution administration takes the defensive mechanism. with that said, it is up to us to reclaim our profession in bringing the nursing profession to a higher caliber standard for all nurses. lastly, it will take all of us pulling together if we want to regain what is rightfully ours, and take charge once again in what nursing is meant to be as we guide our profession into a successful future. in conclusion, i will quote a wise person that once wrote the following... " united we stand divide we fall"
    i agree!there are over 600,000 allnurses.com members. just think what we could accomplish if we truly stuck together!!!!


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