Nurse with hip replacement

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    Hi everyone. I am soon to graduate and I had a minimally invasive hip replacement 3 years ago d/t hereditary issues. I was wondering what your thoughts on a nurse working with a hip replacement are. When I had the surgery, the nurse starting my IV told me I was crazy and I wouldn't be able to do it. My doctor said I would have very few issues with it. Other nurses said I could do it too. So far, so good with clinicals and doing a prn aide job but I wanted to see if any nurses went through it too and how it is going for them. Thanks!
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    I haven't had hip replacement (yet) but I did have microfracture surgery w/ cartilage resurfacing of my left hip last April. I couldn't walk for three months. I still have issues w/ my hip and am afraid that I may be heading to hip replacement.

    BUT....I've read up on it quite a bit and the vast majority of accounts I've read about detail HR as being life changing in terms of added mobility and decreased pain. As for me, I think replacement could only make things better at his point.

    How is your pain level? What meds are you on? I just got put on this great new anti-inflammitory that is really helping. 8 hour clinicals are O.K. for me at this point. I still manage to workout regularly (although it's usually the elliptical or the bike, not so much running anymore).

    Wear good shoes with cushy insoles. I pretty much wear running shoes ALL the time now but you probably already know all about that. I stretch, but not as much as I should.

    Are you finished w/ PT?

    Feel free to PM me. I'd love to ask questions about your HR.
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    Well, i have a similar well not so similar situation, but i didnt know where to post it and i guess in this thread it would be good.

    Well, i am kinda new to this site and i want to become an LPN. Now i dont know what tthis would be considered as, b/c b4 it was a major problem for me in deciding whether or not i wanted to go into the nursing field. Too make a long story short, i had a stroke when i was 4 paralyzing me on my right side, now i can walk talk i drive a car with no special equipment, i have a full time job, the only thing that resulted from me having the stroke is my right hand isnt fully functional, it stays closed all the time. i am 22 years old and i regret not going to nursing school straight out of high school, but i have realized that the only thing holding me back is myself!:angel2: But what i do want to know from other nurses out there is there anyone or yourself included that has a physical disability and that strived to become a nurse? what were the obstacles (if any) that you has to over come? was there ever a point when u just wanted to throw i the towel?

    Thanks to everyone who takes time to read this and/or reply . . .:smilecoffeecup:
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    I know several who have had the type of hip replacement you're talking about and they're doing fine. One is an ER doc who was back to work in a month.
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    my 24 y.o dd had a hip replacement (minimally invasive computer guidied) in June. She has next to no pain now and has more movement and ROM than ever. She does not work as a nurse but is more active and healthy now .. yes nursing does require lots of time on your feet but if you are in decent physical shape and prepare you should be fine. good luck!!
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    Quote from BabyEnjoli
    Well, i have a similar well not so similar situation, but i didnt know where to post it and i guess in this thread it would be good.

    Well, i am kinda new to this site and i want to become an LPN. Now i dont know what tthis would be considered as, b/c b4 it was a major problem for me in deciding whether or not i wanted to go into the nursing field. Too make a long story short, i had a stroke when i was 4 paralyzing me on my right side, now i can walk talk i drive a car with no special equipment, i have a full time job, the only thing that resulted from me having the stroke is my right hand isnt fully functional, it stays closed all the time. i am 22 years old and i regret not going to nursing school straight out of high school, but i have realized that the only thing holding me back is myself!:angel2: But what i do want to know from other nurses out there is there anyone or yourself included that has a physical disability and that strived to become a nurse? what were the obstacles (if any) that you has to over come? was there ever a point when u just wanted to throw i the towel?

    Thanks to everyone who takes time to read this and/or reply . . .:smilecoffeecup:
    I guess it depends on how limited your hand usage is. Maybe you could go into patient care areas and actually see what nurses do. Then you could make the decision for yourself. You know yourself best. Don't let anyone talk you out of it but do be realistic.
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    Do you have walking/standing/lifting restrictions? As a nurse, you could be on your feet for 8, 10, 12, 16 hours at a time, walking up and down halls, lifting and turning heavy patients, pushing beds and stretchers. Maybe you can discuss this with your doctor, too.
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    Quote from tatarn2007
    Hi everyone. I am soon to graduate and I had a minimally invasive hip replacement 3 years ago d/t hereditary issues. I was wondering what your thoughts on a nurse working with a hip replacement are. When I had the surgery, the nurse starting my IV told me I was crazy and I wouldn't be able to do it. My doctor said I would have very few issues with it. Other nurses said I could do it too. So far, so good with clinicals and doing a prn aide job but I wanted to see if any nurses went through it too and how it is going for them. Thanks!
    A girl that I had clinicals with underwent a hip replacement and she said that it didn't bother her anymore. But she did say that the doctor told her that it would eventually go out again, but he couldn't guarantee her a ceratain timeframe. Even if the hip replacement did cause problems, I'm sure that there are nursing positions that require less walking than working on a floor does.
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    I've been an Rn for almost 9 years, I broke my hip skiing when I was 13. Proper shoe support and care by physio or chiropractor do a lot of good.
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    Wildmountain....I think you had the procedure they originally told me about, but said that it would be better to just go with the MIHR because the resurfacing wasnt a sure thing. I have virtually no pain now. There are times after I do an intense swim or workout too much that it is a bit sore, but nothing in comparison to what I experienced prior to getting it done. I do not have to "officially" go to PT. They gave me exercises to do and I did them. When I could drive(2 weeks after), I went to the pool and did a lot of rehabing with that. It helped a lot. Prior to the surgery, I biked, hiked, swam, and worked out even though it was extremely painful. In all seriousness, my DR said that delayed my recovery d/t cutting through a lot of muscle that normal pts don't have. Usually you are walking without a device in a month....it took me 3 months. I hope the info helped. PM me for any more info!

    To everyone else, I do 8 hour clinicals 2 days a week and have no pain and I am on a busy step down unit. I also do prn aide work for a rehab facility. I know I will have to have it redone at some point, but right now it is good. I also go to the chiropractor, swim, bike, and do regular exercise...hopefully it all helps.


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