Restricted nursing license

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    i am facing a restriction against my nursing license for chemical dependency. I was treated over a year ago and have been released by my counselors. I cannot find anyone willing to give me a job, and have had no luck finding any support groups or other nurses in the same situation to discuss this with, if anyone has any suggestions, I would like to hear from you. Thanks.DC.
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    I do not have first hand experience with your situation, so I speak as an observer of what I have seen others do.
    You do not really say what kind of nursing you have tried to re-enter in to. I think this can be a situation that might matter. Some employers will not be inclined to trust a nurse with a CD history with any med administration, others will. If you have not tried for situations where med administration is not an issue, do so. That might include an Ask a nurse type job, insurance nursing (case management or others), may be some types of home health, some public health jobs etc. I know that this might be hard if hospital nursing is in your blood, but realize that you are doing some rebuilding. It would strictly gall me to go in to a role like nurse aide or pt aide, but that might be a way to prove to an employer that you will be a loyal and dependable employee, and it is an option. I cannot say to you that I would do this,but it is an option. If you were receiving services from your state board of nursing asssistance program, I would ask them if they would assist me in contacting a nurse who has successfully re-integrated in the professional world. I would hope that they have some recovered nurses who are a success story and would be willing to mentor others in this area. I read in a professional journal that nurses who are rebuilding in this area can feel very isolated and so a mentor just seems like a really good idea. Alternatively, have you met other nurses at AA or other 12 step support groups that could mentor you.
    I wish you the very best of luck and encourage you to be strong. I know nurses going through our state board assistance program MUST be straight forward about their recovering status with employers and so it almost seems as if you are forced to ruin your own employment chances but I think that you can be your own advocate if you can be ready to discuss the very question at hand; "Why you should offer me this job." You might see if you can get your DAC to write you a letter saying that you've been released from treatment. You might return to her one more time to role play a job interview OR do that with a mentoring recovered nurse. Be ready to straightforwardly recount the strides you've made in recovery that have made you accountable and responsible.
    Good luck. Success follows persistence and hard work.
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    Addictions Nursing and Behavioral Health Nursing are my nursing specialties [spelling is not!]. Although I am working in other areas presently [I hit the perverbial glass ceiling, since most CD programs are financed through gov't grants], I love addictions nursing. I am at ease in the CD sub-culture, which is the complete opposite of we are taught to do and act in a patient environment - It's mentally stimulating - minus the chemicals [sorry - had to say it,I'm goofy enough on my own]

    I am not in recovery, nor do I have personal experience in addiction per se other than as a nurse [my mother was an addictions nurse in the 60's and 70's, I followed her lead]. . but I DO KNOW that most CD residential and out-patient programs have Impaired Professional Programs - it is there you can network. I personally know a Pharmacist who was impaired, and who the state [confidentiality issue] decided to make an example of. Ten years after detox [several], ITP, living in a half-way house, 12-step meetings, and working as a "community counselor (CC)" in a treatment center, almost broke this man and his family financially - FINALLY proved that he could continue to work with narcotics without diverting. He remains clean and sober to this day as a pharmacist AND part-time CC. He said it keeps him humble, and reminds him from where he came. He also takes in fledgling addicts and makes sure they get to meetings, and go to work. I also know a Master Carpenter who does expensive woodwork in million-dollar houses, who works part-time in an ice cream freezer/factory - this keeps him humble also.

    Unfortunately, you are going to have to pay your dues, and frankly one year hasn't been very long.

    Confrontation time - how long were you using?

    Diverting?

    How many people were hurt by your addiction including your family and yourself?

    Total-up the cost, and then ask yourself if you were a patient, would you trust your care to someone with your background?

    Just from the tone of your statement, and I can be totally off-base here, but you appear to me to have lost your connection to your "home" group - they would be able to direct you to a program.

    Are you working your program (steps)? If you worked 1-12, then you start again at Step 1 on a higher level.[ I admit I am powerless over {substance} - and that my life has become unmanageable (AA, pg. 59, 3rd ED.)]

    CD is a justifyable disease state that cannot be cured (yet), until then use what works - remember Bill?.

    Obviously your life remains unmanageable, begin again at Step 1 my friend.

    I hope at this point you have not been put-off, if you are still with me, that is a plus in your favor.

    "It works if you work it, so work it 'cause your worth it"! Press on my friend!

    ------------------
    Keeping the Faith
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    my mother (an LPN)was caught and went through treatment. she was fortunate to have leadership, coworkers, and family who supported her. she continued to work in the same area, first as a nurses' aid, then as an LPN with restrictions after her license was reinstated. she was required to attend several support group meetings a week, and was able to deal with her situation. she also developed a friendship with her lawyer, who used to work for the board, and this helped as well. she has since retired (at 60), and is a very happy "whole" individual
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    my mother (an LPN)was caught and went through treatment. she was fortunate to have leadership, coworkers, and family who supported her. she continued to work in the same area, first as a nurses' aid, then as an LPN with restrictions after her license was reinstated. she was required to attend several support group meetings a week, and was able to deal with her situation. she also developed a friendship with her lawyer, who used to work for the board, and this helped as well. she has since retired (at 60), and is a very happy "whole" individual
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    Hello, i have been going thru this type of thing myself for the past year. now i am getting my license reinstated with a one year key restriction and 4 years pro bation. I have to get quarterly reports from my employer. I dont even know where to try even getting a job?? it is so crazy , but i guess i have to leaqrn my lesson. long story short i was working thru a staffing agency for this place and they ended up reporting me for being "impaired" then i got invested the whole bit. they found out about my past history of filling a prescription for suboxone which is a drug for drug dependent people. well that was 2007 and now i am currently on methadone for the past twp and a half years. I have no idea where to start looking for a job and would like some input. thank you very much. i cant wait tho i am supposed to get it back on September 1 2011...please someone help
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    With all due respect, you are being allowed to work by your state BON while using methadone??
    Are you not in an alternative program such as the IPN (Florida program for nurses) I can't imagine Florida allowing that. Did the Board not require an evaluation by an addictionologist then treatment? Did you not have to go through rehab? I am really quite amazed. This is the first time I have heard of a nurse being actively licensed and on methadone and being allowed to work ...I'm stumped.
    What state are you in? Do you not have an alternate program in your state?
    Did you not want to get clean and off of drugs???
    I just can't imagine this...If so, I would imagine, it will be all but impossible to find a job. It's very difficult when one is clean and in recovery and in a peer program such as the IPN...but at least that sort of a guarentee to the employer that we are monitored and constantly screened...so most of us in the IPN are working...but boy to be actively using methadone...that would be hard to take for any employer, I think.
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    moved to our nurses & recovery forum


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