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Ahn

Ahn

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Ahn's Latest Activity

  1. Ahn

    Why do nurses NOT support each other?

    I think that I have said this somewhere before, but I truly believe that the negative behaviors attributed to nurses "eating their young," is largely due to the way females are socialized. Since nursing is a predominantly female profession, it is no surprise that passive/aggressive and splitting are among favorite defensive/offensive power maneuvers. Male nurses rarely exhibit these behaviors because in our society, males are still preferred over females. Typically, [and you won't like me for saying this] male nurses are still seen by other males in traditionally male roles as effeminate. A male nurse is still a male, and unless he networks like a female, he is still regarded as being more superior to his female colleagues - and is basically left out of the "retribution triangle." First a female nursing instructor that threatens and uses coercion initiates you as a student. Your self-esteem takes a beating, but you manage to graduate from nursing school. A employee supposedly precepts you into your new role as a licensed nurse, but instead, she vents her frustrations on you, finds fault in whatever you do because you are just one more burden placed upon her. It's just easier to do things herself, instead of trying to explain things to you. She has her own patient load, without having to carry the burden of your patients and a new grad. Finally, you survive and incredibly thrive despite what you have been through. You swear that you will never treat anyone the way you were treated. But then, one exceptionally horrendous shift, you are assigned a new grad - and the chain continues! I've tried to break that chain several times, but those links are strong - forged under fire. We all want to stand out from the rest, but unfortunately, kindness and loyalty these days are considered feminine. Alas, for to appear masculine is to appear strong. Usually, males will disagree on issues, and not make issue of people. Other than in beer commercials, have you ever seen groups of males sitting around, talking about what whom is wearing, their significant other, or Tupperware parties? Who is giving whom the "Blues?" ------------------ Keeping the Faith
  2. Ahn

    DNR

    Sounds alot like my situation. At least you got some feedback from the MD to clarify why this situation was not a "resuscitation," but a correction of an emergent situation. Thanx! ------------------ Keeping the Faith
  3. Ahn

    DNR

    This may have seemed like a frivolous exercise, but in my experience as an agency nurse, I have been told everything from withholding CPR to withholding suctioning, insulin, and enteral feeding when they had already had a PEG tube placed. It is very frustrating to walk into a situation where a swift, rational decision needs to be made, and that decision is misinterpreted as challenging an institution's standard of practice. In one particular situation, I was working as a RN Shift Supervisor. A resident with a PEG tube, in a semi-vegetative state began to aspirate feeding solution, secondary to not having the head of the bed elevated after being turned by the NA's on care rounds. When I found this resident, she was ashen, gasping, and struggling for breath. I suctioned her aggressively, and supplemented oxygen by bagging her for two to three breaths. She began to breathe on her own, and a nasal cannula was applied with oxygen until her color returned to normal. Another nurse working on a separate floor began to be very vocal, and very critical of my decision to "resuscitate" a DNR, which divided the staff. The Nursing Director of the institution did not criticize my performance. But as a result of the incident, I have elected not to return to this particular institution, as their policy was unclear, and this had not been the first time that as a nursing supervisor, my interpretation of an ambiguous policy was neither exonerated nor corrected. ------------------ Keeping the Faith
  4. Ahn

    DNR

    So if the person is suctioned and their airway is cleared, their heart continues to beat - would applying O2 and bagging them until they begin to breathe on their own be a violation of a DNR order?
  5. Ahn

    DNR

    So if they stop breathing, or need suctioning to breathe, does that mean that you would not suction them? CPR - Cardio Pulmonary Resusitation. As long as you are not "bouncing" on their chest in an effort to re-start their heart, would you consider that "artificial" resusitation? Devil's Advocate [And I'm not being stupid], if the pt choked on something, and only needed their airway cleared, would that be a violation of a DNR?
  6. Ahn

    DNR

    I would like to hear what everyone's understanding of what "Do Not Resusitate" means to them personally, as well as in workplace policy. Also, are there other terms used to confuse such as: Do not transport; Do not intubate; No CPR; No antibiotics; No artifical ventillation; No hydration; No enteral feeding; ect.?
  7. Ahn

    I AM FRUSTRATED.... I GIVE UP...

    I live in Hartford, CT - original home of the insurence industry. Think about this! CIGNA Healthcare recently announced that they will begin construction of a 18-hole golf course and luxury hotel and conference center for the SOLE PURPOSE of THEIR EMPLOYEES AND FAMILIES! Now that is Managed Care at it's finest. CIGNA, my healthcare insurence provider/PCS denied my claim for medications that I have been taking regularly for 6 yrs, until the company aurthorized my plan of care. It has taken a week to clear the way to get the medication I need to function normally. For this, I owe to Managed Care and their cost cutting, cookbook for malpractice. Nuff said!
  8. Ahn

    RN test review suggestion needed

    Try "Frye's Nursing Bullets". You will get short pieces of info you need to remember, instead of having to read through a whole chapter. It is worth it's weight in gold! Good Luck!
  9. Ahn

    RN student with questions about mentoring

    AmyRN2b - God bless you! If you are lucky enough to get a "real" orientation without interruption, you will probebly be dealing with more than one person, on more than one shift. When you are licensed, usually that's it! Along with your license come the responsibility of the job. My first job as an RN had an orientation of three days - Yup, just three days! They were so anxious to get me on the floor, orientation hit the back burner. Later on, I did get a more formal orientation by Human Resources, but that was just on insurance and union business. Look around for an experienced nurse that knows their stuff. Someone that you look up to and respect. Someone that will look after you and will be willing to be your mentor. That is where you will get your best orientation into nursing, for you will recieve the "unwritten, real-life" orientation you need to become proficient in your role as an RN. Good Luck!
  10. Ahn

    Concerned Nurses Group

    Sing it Barry - I hear `ya!
  11. Ahn

    Yes, there are so many options

    Honestly . . No, I would not. It saddens me to say this. When paper is valued more than people, when downsizing to increase profit is valued more than quality of life, it's time to re-calabrate our thinking. Patients don't make my job stressful, my co-workers and employers do. We as a group prey upon each other - cannibalizing our young and still optimistic new grads. We say we respect our educated peers, and yet hold it against them for "knowing too much, and trying to stand out." Our very existance is an irony, and a study in contrasts. We are in conflict with ourselves, amoungst ourselves, and outside of ourselves. Recommending nursing during this episode of both outer and inner turmoil, would be akin to offering an alcoholic a beer. ------------------ Keeping the Faith
  12. Ahn

    career confusion

    Zoloft is your answer! Seriously, we are all feeling the pinch these days. Check out the Concerned Nurses Group on HospitalHub's BB. Together we can make enough noise to be heard! We are trying to do something about just what you are talking about. Join us and be heard! ------------------ Keeping the Faith
  13. Ahn

    nurse diploma

    This is addressed to a personal e-mail I recieved from: C. Visconte. I was unable to send my reply due to a flaw of some kind with the e-mail address you sent. I hope this is the BB that inspired your comment. Please write me back via the personal message center on this BB, and I will forward my response. In the meantime, check out; www.nurseweek.com they have an article about the VA and nursing degrees. Hope this helps! ------------------ Keeping the Faith
  14. Ahn

    nurse diploma

    Sakeena, I graduated from a BSN program - but I do have some insight into the ADN program. I chose the BSN program because that I knew that down the road, it would be hard for me personally to get back to school once I was working and raising my family. I also knew that in my home state, that there were changes coming that would make the ADN obsolete. The ANA has been lobbying for years to make the BSN degree the standard for professional nursing. Diploma schools are/or have disappeared. I know for a fact that governmental agencies in my home state mandate a BSN - older nurses were grandfathered if they earned their RN prior to a certain year [i don't remember what year it was]. I do know this because my mother is a nurse, and she fell into this catagory - she also worked for the state and then the federal government. That is why I am familiar with the regulations. There are differences in the level of responsibilities that are given to nurses at various educational levels. BSN's are educated in science, theory and management. Despite popular belief, we can become excellent floor nurses! [smile] And my belief is that one should know and experience what they preach, because they may find themselves wearing both hats at once. [This is more common than before] ADN's spend the greater amount of their education on the floor working. This is a great opportunity to "hone" your skills". From what I have gleened for the literature, ADN programs have a higher drop-out rate than that of the BSN program. Probebly, because 3-4 yrs are being crammed into two. Often, it takes a year or so of preparation in anatomy, math, and chemistry, just to get into the programs. We ALL take the same NCLEX-RN test. Managers aren't born, and experience helps. If you have ever worked with someone who rose to the rank of "manager" without management skills, you know what havoc that can cause! In a climate of cost-cutting, nurses are expendable! A poor manager can cost money to the institution. What a manager does is CONSERVE RESOURCES. Unfortunately, when nurses climb the "corporate ladder", they tend to move away from clinical nursing. Your opportunities are limited by your education. I am seeing more and more employers advertising for master's prepared nurses. This is because of JCAHO regulation and accredidation - which is tied into federal reinbursement. This is how most institutions survive - there is no way around it [now]. Look at your options, and your personal circumstances. What are your short and long term goals? A nursing education is expensive. Generally, most programs that I am familiar with mandate that the applicant be in the upper 1/3 of their class - or the equivilent. How much preparation do you need? How much do you want it? It is not easy, nurses are being forced to do more and more with less and less [excuse the cliche]. The burn-out rate for nurses is high, the disatisfaction rate for nurses is also high - but the rewards can also be great! Good luck with your decision ------------------ Keeping the Faith
  15. Ahn

    nurse diploma

    Sakeena, I graduated from a BSN program - but I do have some insight into the ADN program. I chose the BSN program because that I knew that down the road, it would be hard for me personally to get back to school once I was working and raising my family. I also knew that in my home state, that there were changes coming that would make the ADN obsolete. The ANA has been lobbying for years to make the BSN degree the standard for professional nursing. Diploma schools are/or have disappeared. I know for a fact that governmental agencies in my home state mandate a BSN - older nurses were grandfathered if they earned their RN prior to a certain year [i don't remember what year it was]. I do know this because my mother is a nurse, and she fell into this catagory - she also worked for the state and then the federal government. That is why I am familiar with the regulations. There are differences in the level of responsibilities that are given to nurses at various educational levels. BSN's are educated in science, theory and management. Despite popular belief, we can become excellent floor nurses! [smile] And my belief is that one should know and experience what they preach, because they may find themselves wearing both hats at once. [This is more common than before] ADN's spend the greater amount of their education on the floor working. This is a great opportunity to "hone" your skills". From what I have gleened for the literature, ADN programs have a higher drop-out rate than that of the BSN program. Probebly, because 3-4 yrs are being crammed into two. Often, it takes a year or so of preparation in anatomy, math, and chemistry, just to get into the programs. We ALL take the same NCLEX-RN test. Managers aren't born, and experience helps. If you have ever worked with someone who rose to the rank of "manager" without management skills, you know what havoc that can cause! In a climate of cost-cutting, nurses are expendable! A poor manager can cost money to the institution. What a manager does is CONSERVE RESOURCES. Unfortunately, when nurses climb the "corporate ladder", they tend to move away from clinical nursing. Your opportunities are limited by your education. I am seeing more and more employers advertising for master's prepared nurses. This is because of JCAHO regulation and accredidation - which is tied into federal reinbursement. This is how most institutions survive - there is no way around it [now]. Look at your options, and your personal circumstances. What are your short and long term goals? A nursing education is expensive. Generally, most programs that I am familiar with mandate that the applicant be in the upper 1/3 of their class - or the equivilent. How much preparation do you need? How much do you want it? It is not easy, nurses are being forced to do more and more with less and less [excuse the cliche]. The burn-out rate for nurses is high, the disatisfaction rate for nurses is also high - but the rewards can also be great! Good luck with your decision ------------------ Keeping the Faith
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