Nurses who smoke Marijuana? - page 11

Hello all, I am currently taking my prerequisites for Nursing. I know two nurses, one is a friend of my mothers and she is a Nurse Practitioner and my boyfriend's mother is a charge nurse in... Read More

  1. by   jdub6
    Quote from elkpark
    I don't have any personal experience or knowledge, but I do know that some members have posted here in the past that the BONs in some states do not allow individuals taking psychoactive medications (like Ativan) with a rx, under a physician's supervision, to practice. No psychoactive meds, period, with or without a rx.
    This must differ from state to state. As far as I know the only drug that is absolutely not allowed in mine is methadone (which I personally believe is less impairing than some of the allowed drugs but that's the way it is. )

    Every pre hire drug test I've gone to they ask you to disclose your meds and if it's Ativan or something they ask for the bottle or md note and that's it.
  2. by   jdub6
    Quote from subee
    Just because someone has a prescription for a drug does Not mean that they are free to work while under the effects if the drug.
    There are no medical indications for MJ with the exceptions of HIV and MS. Being in a diversion program for years and having to hire a lawyer made my decision to quit quite easy.
    This also is state dependant. My state has I think about 12 conditions including epilepsy, maybe ptsd, a bunch of others. And they are adding more.

    The unique issue here is that, as others have said, it is still federally illegal regardless of prescription status.. I could see where that could make it a no go no matter what your state law is.
  3. by   jdub6
    Quote from icuRNmaggie
    Would that make possession of a small amount a misdemeanor and not a felony?
    No. I have lived in cities which have decriminalization mj. You got a 25$ fine for possession- much like a speeding ticket. No record unless you don't pay.
  4. by   LLLovely
    Quote from subee
    Just because someone has a prescription for a drug does Not mean that they are free to work while under the effects if the drug.
    There are no medical indications for MJ with the exceptions of HIV and MS. Being in a diversion program for years and having to hire a lawyer made my decision to quit quite easy.
    Actually, there are quite a few other medical indications including glaucoma and PTSD, but none of that matters. If your state, state BON, or facility prohibits it, then that's it. It can be legal all day long and still not allowed. Opiates are legal if you have a prescription and a medical indication to use them. We all know that means you still can't show up at work with opiates in your system. Unfortunately, testing for marijuana is not sophisticated enough to determine when you used it or whether you are currently high.

    I live in a state where marijuana is legal for both medical and recreational use. At every facility, there is a statement of understanding to sign that says that you cannot use marijuana while an employee. Whether you think that is stupid, or whether it is empirically stupid, is irrelevant. If you get tested and THC or THC metabolites are present, you are subject to disciplinary action and may be at risk for losing your nursing license. Some facilities go so far as to say that their ability to dispense medications is governed by Federal law and therefore marijuana use among employees who may prescribe or dispense or administer medication is prohibited by Federal law.

    I voted for marijuana to be legal in this state, despite the fact that so long as I'm working as a nurse, I won't be able to partake because I know it is not worth it. Truthfully, I am just not lucky enough to take the chance. Even as a kid, if everybody was doing something wrong, I'd be the one to get caught and made into an example. That is not a big deal if you are taping a "kick me" sign to someone's back, but substance use while holding an RN license is. Again, it is just not worth my license to risk it.

    Should there be a more sophisticated test in the future and should the BON and facility where I work happen to allow off-duty marijuana as they do alcohol, I'll probably try it now and again on a weekend. I haven't had any since the age of 18, so waiting for it to become legal, which I believe it will, is not really a big sacrifice for me. I really think that if it is a big sacrifice for someone, they need to give some serious consideration to why that might be true.
  5. by   GCom24
    Just have to bump this again. If you're done with it, carry on.

    It is bewildering that marijuana is talked about as if it's a mind-altering substance in the same caliber as LSD or psilocybin. I do not think anyone so far has argued that marijuana, where legal by state and federal law for recreational or medical use, then be ratified by the BON to allow nurses to blaze up right before a long shift in the exact same way that alcohol which is legal at state and federal levels for just recreational use would anyone ever think, oh that means I can do a couple tequila shots before we run this code. the effects that THC and ETOH have on an individual are so drastically different. It's like hm, should I give clonazepam for this acute anxiety attack or should I slam em with 10 of haldol and follow it up with some ketamine? Do you want your pt moderately relaxed or dissociated and sedated? I totally get the state < federal < BON < employer policy. But how people with a solid background in pharmacology and pharmacokinetics can possibly defend this idea that as nurses who practice in a legal atmosphere where it would be entirely acceptable to get off work, have a few cold ones and come to work the next day, can say that that same Nurse given legal ability to do so should not be allowed to smoke a joint, eat a brownie, vaporize, whatever is so far beyond me.

    I really think all I can say is, when that day comes and the only thing between those who wish to do so and doing it is the BON, it is time for serious petitioning, research, and action.

    i want to see it legal for recreational and medicinal in all 50. And as public health advocates, it's something we can get behind. Drug and violence that occur around marijuana is irrelevant to the substance in and of itself. See prohibition.
  6. by   Paco5293
    What makes this thread sad to me is the fact that we as nurses are supposed to rely on evidence based practice when making decisions yet a majority of us ignore mountains of evidence about the harmless nature of marijuana yet some of you will happily go and grab drinks after work. Legality does not nor has ever meant moral and/or factual.
  7. by   subee
    Marijuana as harmless? Michigan has suffered an extra 1,600 traffic deaths following the legalization of medical marijuana and a huge increase in the DUI arrests. Now, how many of these are attributable to MJ is not clear but stats changed with legalization. Coincidence? No way. This stuff they are selling now is extremely potent, now the mellow stuff we smoked decades ago. The medical intent is so abused that I could get it for a pimple. A handful of MD's are prescribing thousands of "prescriptions." Also check out traffic deaths in Colorado post-legalization. Not encouraging. There are very limited medical indications for MJ and those patients are usually too sick to drive. I guess if it keeps people on MJ instead of heroin that is a win...but not when they're driving.
  8. by   Paco5293
    Correlation does not equal causation. Alcohol has killed millions as well as cigarettes yet they are legal. You have to be consistent with your judgements on matters such as this or else your credibility lacks.
  9. by   subee
    Cigarettes and alcohol might not ever be legalized today because of deaths, medical and societal costs, etc. The NIH has probably conducted the most exhaustive research on MJ that I have been able to find. You will see how there is no linear relationship between blood levels and psychomotor performance so even establishing safe driving limits is futile. However, some countries in Europe have established ranges for DUI purposes.
    We have a women in my town who is being crucified for 1 ngm. They want to add DUI charges and she has already suffered the loss of her mother in the accident. It is insane to willy-nilly call a potent mind altering substance safe enough to legalize and yet establish no parameters. I worked in peer assistance
    worked in peer assistance with nurse-addicts for many years and am not moralizing here. I did a lot of pot in the day and have tried the medical stuff just to see how strong it is. I do not want it criminalized. I now work with kids in family court and I can tell you that there are families that will pay for pot but not for food for their kids. Yes, they are also paying for other drugs but pot is in the mixture because virtually everyone in the court systems tests positive for MJ because it's as available as toilet paper. Check out its effect on the adolescent brain and come back and tell me how harmless it is.
  10. by   Paco5293
    That's an adolescent. Sugar probably does more harm than marijuana through adolescence. Unfortunately when it comes to freedom of autonomy safety is not a guarantee. While the NIH has done extensive research you cannot have a comparing voice on the matter because research on marijuana is still prohibited for private companies as it's still a schedule 1 narcotic and thus cannot be effectively studied. Go look at European research to truly find effective and thorough research on marijuana. Until it's removed from schedule 1 the NIH is biased and it's credibility is untested therefore invalid until they lift their silly little bans. Would you believe someone's opinion if they had a ban on researching that opinion yourself? Also drug screens typically have a cutoff of 25 ngm, any lower won't hold up in court. Gas spectrometers go as low as 15 ngm
    Last edit by Paco5293 on Jun 22
  11. by   Kel65
    True that on the non-alcoholic DUI charges.
    Last edit by Kel65 on Jun 27 : Reason: Error
  12. by   subee
    Quote from Paco5293
    That's an adolescent. Sugar probably does more harm than marijuana through adolescence. Unfortunately when it comes to freedom of autonomy safety is not a guarantee. While the NIH has done extensive research you cannot have a comparing voice on the matter because research on marijuana is still prohibited for private companies as it's still a schedule 1 narcotic and thus cannot be effectively studied. Go look at European research to truly find effective and thorough research on marijuana. Until it's removed from schedule 1 the NIH is biased and it's credibility is untested therefore invalid until they lift their silly little bans. Would you believe someone's opinion if they had a ban on researching that opinion yourself? Also drug screens typically have a cutoff of 25 ngm, any lower won't hold up in court. Gas spectrometers go as low as 15 ngm
    NIH didn't make up this stupid law.
  13. by   Paco5293
    Never said they did, but they are an extension of the government who did and are funded at the tune of 30 billion dollars.

close