You might want to avoid this recruiting company - page 2

I received an recruitment email from Delta Healthcare Providers. I replied and ask that the recruited please address me by my title in the future. I think we deserve professional respect. I was nice... Read More

  1. Visit  brithoover profile page
    0
    On the chance of sounding dumb..what do you call an NP? I've always used first names!
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  3. Visit  nomadcrna profile page
    0
    First, the non NPs, don't bother replying. No offense but your opinion does not mean much.
    For the others, you are sadly missing the point. The point is the snarky response to my polite request. The point is not about not being called Dr., although we could have a separate discussion about professionalism.
    I actually thought NPs would want to know about a company with this type of attitude, I was wrong about this particular forum.
    So for those of you having reading comprehension issues, re-read slowly and realize what the point is.
  4. Visit  Enthused RN profile page
    1
    Quote from brithoover
    On the chance of sounding dumb..what do you call an NP? I've always used first names!
    It looks like the OP has a doctorate degree so she wants to be addressed in accordance with that.
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  5. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    1
    I do agree that if we as APNs go the distance to obtain a doctorate, that we should be addressed as Doctor when in a professional setting.

    Its nice that they made this right with you.
    vintagemother likes this.
  6. Visit  nursetim profile page
    1
    I think the OP got bent out of the frame because of the snotty reply. So what? Just don't do business with them. I have had a few companies rub me the wrong way. I just don't take their calls and don't do business with them. I don't go around whining about it.

    BTW, I am of the direct opposite opinion as traumarus though.
    Nccity2002 likes this.
  7. Visit  nomadcrna profile page
    1
    You may consider it whining while I consider it defending our practice and furthering the NP cause. It is why I whine to get full staff membership and whine to get the practice privileges NP deserve. It is why I whine to our representatives about NP practice. It is why I whine and support my PA Collegues in their battles.
    And yes, I whine to correct clueless head hunters who refer to NPs as midlevel practitioners.
    Nursetonp likes this.
  8. Visit  cjcsoon2brn profile page
    1
    I'm not an NP (not yet anyway) but I think that the OP makes a valid point. The OP politely asked the recruiter to address him/her by his/her proper title (Dr. ABC) and instead of the recruiter politely apologizing and complying with the request the recruiter had to make a quip that was rude and unprofessional. I think that if you earned a title then you should be addressed by that title, especially in the professional setting. It seems like a basic concept in business and professionalism to me.

    !Chris
    myelin likes this.
  9. Visit  gloryfied profile page
    2
    I might want to avoid this recruiting company because they wont adress me with my professional name?
    Give me some real issues please. Something that affects my license, my pay check, their morals they promised. Some real issues please. The health care field is in so much corruption, i got no time to be walking around expeting to be called by my professional name, with all the other crap going on around us.

    wow.
    NPAlby and TeenyTinyBabyRN like this.
  10. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    3
    This is a hard fought battle among APNs in all specialties. I have several friends that have their doctorate and when we are in the professional setting, I 100% call them Doctor - they did the work, they earned the title.

    Privately and one on one, I of course address them by first name. I agree with NomadCRNA that if we, as APNs denigrate our doctorate degrees, then we are never going to be considered professional. I am very fortunate to be in a practice where APNs and PAs are treated as equals and very much respected and compensated.
    cjcsoon2brn, myelin, and Tina, RN like this.
  11. Visit  edmia profile page
    0
    Quote from nomadcrna
    You may consider it whining while I consider it defending our practice and furthering the NP cause. It is why I whine to get full staff membership and whine to get the practice privileges NP deserve. It is why I whine to our representatives about NP practice. It is why I whine and support my PA Collegues in their battles.
    And yes, I whine to correct clueless head hunters who refer to NPs as midlevel practitioners.
    Thank you! We should all be whining to be treated with respect.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  12. Visit  NPAlby profile page
    0
    WHo cares how they address you in a mass produced email? I want to know how much they're going to pay me. Get the name on the check right! Yeah I get annoyed at times about being called "the nurse" but eh. Beats the other things I've been called in my career!
  13. Visit  Tina, RN profile page
    0
    The reason OP cautioned against the recruiter was the rude email reply that was received, not specifically because of the way he/she was addressed.

    If the way you are treated by a recruiter doesn't matter to you, so be it. IMO, an MD would never be treated the way OP was. OP deserves his/her title. It should be used, unless otherwise requested.

    "Aw, shucks. Little ol' me? No, just call me by my first name..." BOLONEY! If I worked that hard for my degrees, I want the recognition!
  14. Visit  nursetim profile page
    2
    Now you have switched gears from a personal affront by an agency to a general advocacy issue. If you reread my initial post, I agreed you received a snotty reply. But you were whiney about it. I never said that you shouldn't be called whatever you want, just that you should get over yourself if you do not get your way. I never said that advocating for our profession was whining.

    As to being addressed as "doctor" in the clinical setting, that will always be contraversional and seen from 2 camps. If you want to be addressed as doctor and confuse our patients, fine, technically you would be correct.

    My personal stance is, if you want to be addressed as "doctor" in the clinical setting, put the same time in training as the MD and DOs. When our training is on par, then fair enough. When DOs hit the scene, they also fought for recognition, and they had more training than the MDs with the addition of chiropractic manipulation to the standard MD curriculum. Same residency requirements. When we have the same standard, then good to go. If you want to be addressed as "doctor" in the academic setting, fine. If I should ever see the benefit to getting my doctorate, we have what? 5 In nursing now? I will still not introduce my self as "doctor" nursetim. If I decide to pursue the same level of training as an MD, then I will call myself Dr. Nursetim. Y'all do what your conscience lets you do. It makes me no real nevermind.
    Nccity2002 and NPAlby like this.


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