How much notice when you quit a job as an APN???

  1. [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]Need some input guys. I am an APN in a private practice. I gave my notice last week that my last day would be October 20th which was one month notice. I also agreed to stay on and work two additional weekends in November as a moonlighter since they would be short-staffed on the weekend call schedule. I truly thought I was being generous. Today, one of the other APNs told me that she was told THREE MONTHS was the amount of time needed for a job change notice.

    Who else has quit an APN position and what length of notice did you give? I don't have any more options as I will also have call in my new position and it will not be possible to do call at multiple hospitals at the same time.

    Please be honest - am I giving enough notice? Thanks much.
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   Jolie
    Does your practice have anything in writing in terms of Human Resources policies and procedures? Do they retain the right to with-hold any pay or benefits from employees who leave without giving notice according to their policy?

    If not, then I think your 4 weeks notice is more than adequate, especially since you agreed to help out with weekend call in November (Thanksgiving, I assume). Unless the practice manager has said something directly to you, and has a written policy to support his/her request for more notice, I wouldn't worry about it.

    It is always best to leave on good terms, especially in a small town, but I think your boss would be hard pressed to show that you have not acted in good faith.
  4. by   core0
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Need some input guys. I am an APN in a private practice. I gave my notice last week that my last day would be October 20th which was one month notice. I also agreed to stay on and work two additional weekends in November as a moonlighter since they would be short-staffed on the weekend call schedule. I truly thought I was being generous. Today, one of the other APNs told me that she was told THREE MONTHS was the amount of time needed for a job change notice.

    Who else has quit an APN position and what length of notice did you give? I don't have any more options as I will also have call in my new position and it will not be possible to do call at multiple hospitals at the same time.

    Please be honest - am I giving enough notice? Thanks much.
    What does your contract say? I gave 60 days since that was what the contract stated. Now I was in an at will state so that was not required but you want to leave on good terms. Also it takes a while to get credentialled (at least a month) so it usually works out OK. For comparison the MDs had to give six months notice if they want to leave the practice.

    As for what the other APN told you it sounds like they realized they had a little problem. Remember that if they want to amend the contract it works both ways. If they wanted to amend my contract to increase the notice I would get a quid pro such as you have to pay me three months salary if I am fired without cause (cause defined as something that involves handcuffs). I think you did fine. If nothing else you have caused them to realize the value of an APN and the headache of not having them.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  5. by   KenCCRN
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Need some input guys. I am an APN in a private practice. I gave my notice last week that my last day would be October 20th which was one month notice. I also agreed to stay on and work two additional weekends in November as a moonlighter since they would be short-staffed on the weekend call schedule. I truly thought I was being generous. Today, one of the other APNs told me that she was told THREE MONTHS was the amount of time needed for a job change notice.

    Who else has quit an APN position and what length of notice did you give? I don't have any more options as I will also have call in my new position and it will not be possible to do call at multiple hospitals at the same time.

    Please be honest - am I giving enough notice? Thanks much.
    I am not an APN, however.....1 month is sufficient notice to give. Its not like they made you a partner or something. You have to look out for your own interests...no one else will.
    Good Luck!
    Ken
  6. by   core0
    Quote from KenCCRN
    I am not an APN, however.....1 month is sufficient notice to give. Its not like they made you a partner or something. You have to look out for your own interests...no one else will.
    Good Luck!
    Ken
    It depends on the relationship that you have. I gave the practice 9 months notice that I was looking. They were patient which allowed me to find a job I really wanted. They could have started looking and forced me out but didn't. I gave them plenty of warning and helped get my replacement on board. You are a provider and have some responsibility to the practice and the patients. If you are treated well and think that it will be well received keep them in the net and give them lots of warning. If you are treated poorly or they are not receptive to people moving then give them the professional minimum.

    You also have to consider that whoever they hire probably needs to give notice etc.

    On the other hand I have seen the "think of the patients" guilt trip used to keep people in positions where they did not want to be. Ultimately you have to look out for yourself. Keep it civil, keep it professional but do whats best for you.

    Ideally given credentialling licensing etc 60-90 days is fair. But it has to be a two way street. There needs to be a similar payout if they fire you without cause. If that isn't there the professional thing is at least two weeks.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  7. by   oldiebutgoodie
    Good lord, I would think that 1 month would be sufficient. Unless you have a contract, with notice time built into it, I would think that 1 month would be fine. From what I understand, slavery was outlawed some time ago.

    It sounds like this practice was working you to death, anyway. Where did the other APN get this idea of 3 months? And how many employers are going to hold a job for 3 months???

    I learned a long time ago that if you are loyal to your employer and put your employer's needs before your own, they will treat you badly anyway. As long as you have been professional, I think you have done just fine.

    Oldiebutgoodie
    Last edit by sirI on Sep 27, '07 : Reason: TOS
  8. by   traumaRUs
    I have no contract and the employee handbook states two week notice. I do have patient care responsibilities but I don't see how I could have given more notice due to the new job requirements. I had asked to wait until Dec 1st but that was not an option. I have also offered to try to see some pts after my new job is completed (it is strictly 40 hours during orientation). I do sincerely want to leave on good terms.

    Thank you everyone.
  9. by   sirI
    traumaRUs, it might be impossible to leave this practice on good terms. I suggest to just follow through with your original plan.

    I've given 3 months notice in the past, but was clearly stated in my contract. It takes time to search/recruit for a replacement postition and 3 months is about the minimum to give notice in most situations. In some positions, a year's notice is required. Again, this should be clearly stated in a contract. Since you've no contract and the subject of termination of the postion (from either end) was not addressed previously, I see nothing unprofessional with your giving 1 month.

    As David pointed out (and, I've said the same thing), "Ultimately you have to look out for yourself. Keep it civil, keep it professional but do whats best for you."

    Good luck with that new position. I know you are glad to be there.

    (edited to add: I always advise the APN to have a contract. IMO, you should have one for this new position)
    Last edit by sirI on Sep 27, '07
  10. by   SteveNNP
    So.... what's the new job?
  11. by   santhony44
    I've never had more than 30 days required. I've given longer notice than that a couple of times (6 weeks) but only because I could.

    I've never given an employer notice that I was looking. In my last job, someone in another clinic notified my CEO that I'd sent in my resume. I was confronted with it and thereafter wore a bulls'-eye on my back. The other clinic had decided not to interview me for the position- until they found out I knew what had happened. Then they were oh so eager to interview me and offer me the job. (I didn't take it). My replacement was hired and I was about to be pushed into another position when my current one opened up. I still gave 6 weeks' notice and left on good terms.

    Trauma, I think one month was adequate and offering to cover the two extra weekends was generous.

    When I left one job, I offered to continue to take (telephone only) call for the group, since someone else was out on maternity leave. Two years later, I'm still doing it and get paid for it.
  12. by   traumaRUs
    Okay guys I'm such a weenie:

    I'm now working the additional two weekends AND I'm seeing 18 pts a week for the month of November!

    I caved! I'm sorry!


    My new position is in palliative care - we are opening a program in a large (710 bed) hospital where I worked for 10 years. It is a new program set to kick off in mid-November. Should be very interesting - will focus on pts with chronic, life-limiting diagnoses like ESRD, cancer, severe CHF, etc.
  13. by   sirI
    You are not a weenie.

    You did what in your heart and mind was the right thing.

    I admire that.

    You are a professional!!!!
  14. by   VivaRN
    Congratulations on your new job! What a neat way to stretch your wings and try something new.
    :spin:

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