Why do some nurses use their titles as a big ego boost? - page 7

by Hellostudentnurssee

Specifically talking in social settings. I understand if you're at work or at a job interview, your title needs to be specified. I have a friend who I've been doing pre-reqs with years back. Our goal was always BSN. We took... Read More


  1. 2
    Quote from Pangea Reunited
    I think I know the "type" you're talking about. They're overly proud, and they annoy the whole world with their pride. It's not an RN/LVN thing. It's a, "Hey world! Look at meeeee!" thing.
    These nurses can't order a cheeseburger without working in some statement about how it effects them as an RN. Maybe it's "brain food" for studying. Maybe they worked in a Burger King while they were waiting to get into RN school. Maybe they read an article about organic lettuce in a nursing journal...
    My strategy is to playfully let these people know that I don't take myself so seriously.

    "Are there any LPN jobs you can find?"
    Why would I want to find a job as an LPN when I could get a job filling vending machines. I looove M&M's.

    "Are you going to continue on to be an LPN?"
    I'm thinking of completely changing direction. I want to design kites.

    After I give the shortest and dumbest answer I can think of, I immediately change the subject. Eventually, they learn to be less boring and single-minded.
    nursel56 and BrandonLPN like this.
  2. 2
    Yes, there's two ways of looking at the subject, and specifically the OP's situation.

    On the one hand, maybe the OP is being over sensitive and this is indeed a "sour grapes" thing. If a LPN feels inadequate and jealous, there's a couple options. You can get over it and be happy being a LPN. Or, if you can't do that, well, I guess you better get off your butt and go back to school.

    On the other hand, maybe the RN in the OP's post really is one of those who somehow works the "Im a RN and you're not" bit into every conceivable conservation. C'mon, we all know people like this. This isn't called being proud of one's accomplishments, this is called being an oblivious narcissist. Like the neighbor lady who works the fact that her son's a congressman into every conversation she's ever had. Or the green hippie-ish person who manages to bring the conversation back to him and what he's doing to save the planet and how he's a hero and look at me! Look at me! Look at me!

    If the OP is dealing with a person like this, of course she has a point.

    But we don't really know, cause we weren't there. Such are the limitations of an Internet message board......
    uRNmyway and jadelpn like this.
  3. 2
    I think it could be that you're being sensitive. Who knows really without knowing the entire story, background, tones, etc.

    I know that when I first started working (at 16) I worked in a fast food place which I stayed at for several years off and on. I became really good friends with some of the people I worked with. At one point, I practically lived with my friend/co-worker who was a single mom and I helped her look after her kids. I was fairly young, pregnant myself, and she was a great friend and support. I'm still grateful to this day for her.

    As time went on and as I gained more education, we drifted apart. Some of it was due to the fact that I was busy with school, had another job, and had my own family. Some of it was due to the fact that she started returning my calls less and acting strange when I visited. Finally, she said it...in a "joking" manner of course....that I was "too good" now. I'm the one that kept reaching out, but I think because of her own insecurities our friendship changed. Her mother passed away and I went to visit her and went to the services, but we really aren't friends like we were before. Most of my friends/acquaintances now do happen to be people who I went to college with or worked with post graduation. It wasn't on purpose, but I just got tired of feeling like I had to defend myself or avoid talking about certain subjects because it might make someone jealous. It happens at work sometimes too. I can be talking about how expensive my kid's sports equipment is and a tech will say something like, "I don't even want to hear it," or I mentioned that my kids got laptops for Christmas (which I didn't even buy, and they're pretty cheap now anyway) and get a comment like, "It must be nice."

    It gets exhausting having to worry about if what you're going to say is going to offend someone else or not. That's my theory on why people of similar "status" tend to associate with each other. I'm NOT saying that RN is greater status than LPN either, but there are obvious tensions between people with different education levels, incomes, etc., and I don't think that tension is always the fault of person with the higher education, income, etc.
    uRNmyway and wooh like this.
  4. 2
    Quote from Jory
    I have to say, and not being mean at all, that the people that always seem to have the biggest issue is the people with the lesser degree.

    There is a massive difference between an LPN and an RN and the LPN's in my RN program said that they didn't understand how big the difference was until they were about 1/2 way through the RN program...now they see.

    I am in graduate school and I don't think my BSN makes me a better nurse at all. I see no reason for anyone who doesn't want to get into management or leave the bedside, to get a BSN. If I didn't aspire to do more, I can assure you, I wouldn't have bothered.

    However, when people ask me what I do, I say, "I'm an RN"...because there IS a distinction between what I do versus an LPN. I never say that I have a BSN. However, I worked with an LPN that never seemed to want to tell anyone she was an LPN. She always tells everyone she is a "nurse" and while true, there is a huge assumption that she is an RN because she works in a critical care unit, and trust me...she knows it.

    Needless to say, she is a difficult person to work with on top of it.
    If she's an LPN she is a nurse and is entitled to use the title. When people ask me what I do I say I'm a nurse. Most of the time, that's all that is necessary.
    Designer NP and nursel56 like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    I think it could be that you're being sensitive. Who knows really without knowing the entire story, background, tones, etc.

    I know that when I first started working (at 16) I worked in a fast food place which I stayed at for several years off and on. I became really good friends with some of the people I worked with. At one point, I practically lived with my friend/co-worker who was a single mom and I helped her look after her kids. I was fairly young, pregnant myself, and she was a great friend and support. I'm still grateful to this day for her.

    As time went on and as I gained more education, we drifted apart. Some of it was due to the fact that I was busy with school, had another job, and had my own family. Some of it was due to the fact that she started returning my calls less and acting strange when I visited. Finally, she said it...in a "joking" manner of course....that I was "too good" now. I'm the one that kept reaching out, but I think because of her own insecurities our friendship changed. Her mother passed away and I went to visit her and went to the services, but we really aren't friends like we were before. Most of my friends/acquaintances now do happen to be people who I went to college with or worked with post graduation. It wasn't on purpose, but I just got tired of feeling like I had to defend myself or avoid talking about certain subjects because it might make someone jealous. It happens at work sometimes too. I can be talking about how expensive my kid's sports equipment is and a tech will say something like, "I don't even want to hear it," or I mentioned that my kids got laptops for Christmas (which I didn't even buy, and they're pretty cheap now anyway) and get a comment like, "It must be nice."

    It gets exhausting having to worry about if what you're going to say is going to offend someone else or not. That's my theory on why people of similar "status" tend to associate with each other. I'm NOT saying that RN is greater status than LPN either, but there are obvious tensions between people with different education levels, incomes, etc., and I don't think that tension is always the fault of person with the higher education, income, etc.
    I can understand this. One of my closest friends didn't go to school after high school. Most of the time we get along fine, but sometimes out of nowhere she will snap and say how it isn't fair that I make so much money (I've never discussed $$$ with her and live modestly) when she has worked hard all her life and can't get ahead. I don't know what to do about it except let her vent and get it off her chest.
  6. 0
    I call myself a nurse. Not an RN, not a registered nurse, not an RN, MS. Personally, when I hear someone call themselves a nurse,I assume they are an RN. LPNs are not as common in my area, there are few LPNs in the hospitals. The ones that do work in my clinical affiliation wear a different color (thus, making a distinction).

    I am hoping to begin my PhD studies in the fall. Will I call myself "Doctor"? Not all the time, and I don't expect my friends and family to call me that. I'm sure half of my students will still call my professor (as they often to with my colleagues who have doctoral degrees). But, I will be very proud to have earned that distinction, and will add it to my email signature, Facebook, twitter, and business cards. None of my friends (people who I met through nursing, outside of teaching) have a doctorate. Few have a masters degree. I barely even think about it. to me they are my friends and fellow nurses. If they think I am rubbing it in, too bad for them. As a firmed, they should be proud of me. What if I didn't have kids (and wanted them so badly) and I got offended by all the stick-figure families that people proudly display on their mini-vans? What if I didn't own a home, and they all did, would I not go visit them? We are all different, and our successes are measured in different ways (and it's all subjective).

    Someone will always have something that you want (that is, IF you want it). This is what breeds healthy competition,as well as motivation for people to succeed. I may get blasted for this, but I cannot imagine that any LPN would not want to become an RN. While it may not be feasible, (finances, intellectual ability, family circumstances), I would think it is the natural progression. (I'd love to hear from anyone who feels otherwise, not as a challenge, but just to understand why you wouldn't do it). Honestly, it's ok to say "I wish I could go for my RN". I hear people say stuff like that to me all the time.
  7. 0
    I call myself an RN. The few times I've said "nurse" people have asked me "RN" or "LVN"

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
  8. 0
    I tend to just say "nurse" just because it's been my experience that a surprising percentage of the general population simply have no idea what a "LPN" is.

    In fact, when I say "it stands for 'licensed practical nurse'.", more than a few people have somehow equated the word "practical" with the word "practitioner" and assume I'm a NP. Who has time to go through this song-and-dance over and over? And trying to explain all the education and scope of practice differences only results in glazed eyes and bored expressions.

    Saying "nurse" is just easier.
  9. 0
    I'm an LPN and I feel like OP is a little oversensitive. At least she didn't have people asking how come she "didn't want to be a real nurse." like I did. I went back and am graduating with my ADN soon. Because I wanted to advance myself, not shut everyone else up.


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