Where are all the "older" nurses? Where are all the "older" nurses? - pg.6 | allnurses

Where are all the "older" nurses? - page 6

I'm a new nursing student. 2nd career. I'm 48. I've been doing a lot of student shadowing at my local hospital in the different departments lately and its been amazing! Everything from NICU to... Read More

  1. Visit  CaffeinePOQ4HPRN profile page
    #65 7
    I don't know "Where are all the 'older' nurses?" but I sure as hell hope those well deserving ladies and gents have their feet elevated atop the comfiest pillow between whatever work they choose to/have to do and get the chance to relax. Nursing is exhausting, I hope those who've had a long tenure have the chance/ability for (adequate) rest and self-care. So much respect for anyone who can do this job for decades. What we do is not for the faint of heart, not for those who are "pliable", those with loose ethics, those who don't have a deep and sincere love for humanity and seeing the world be well.

    In my bedside job (I have 3 jobs FYI), I work alongside nurses whose ages range from 29-yrs through 73-yrs old... despite their varied ages they are ALL effing tired. I hope they all have someone in their life who loves them enough to draw them a bath after their long, exhausting shifts or on the weekend, do something simple and kind to help them feel special/loved and decompress from the difficult work we all do. Let's be flipping honest here, bedside is physically challenging and demanding... it's realistically more demanding on those of advanced age. If they have the opportunity to transition into a teaching position, I sincerely hope they have the chance to get off their damn feet. Stop the glorification of nurses pushing their bodies to extreme limits.

    Merry Christmas/Happy Holidays everyone. Hope you and yours are well.
    Last edit by CaffeinePOQ4HPRN on Dec 24, '16
  2. Visit  RN-Doula profile page
    #66 2
    I'm 60+, former L & D, now teach nursing school OB, but still call myself a L & D nurse. Many of my co-workers, 50 to 60 are still there but in charge positions so not the physical stuff. Lots of younger nurses filling in the ranks. I have the knowledge but many of the new staff want to learn it on their own and not question me. I delivered a breech vaginally once. Woman came in active labor, 2 legs out her vagina. In the 70's all breeches were vaginal, I watched and learned along with the OB interns. Had a healthy baby in a few minutes, none of the nurses thought it was possible.

    The stress on the joints, running down the hall pushing a bed to the OR for crash C-birth, yes so much easier just teaching the students how to swaddle a baby so they can teach new parents.
  3. Visit  CaffeinePOQ4HPRN profile page
    #67 3
    Quote from RN-Doula
    ...The stress on the joints, running down the hall pushing a bed to the OR for crash C-birth, yes so much easier just teaching the students how to swaddle a baby so they can teach new parents.
    EXACTLY! The OP is self-described "a new nursing student" he/she has no G-D clue what's really entailed in performing the job of a licensed nurse... when you are all alone, responsible for a full workload, huge stack of charts full of patients with a million co-morbidity and nervous families (all itching to try to sue for the most insignificant things...ex. nurse in question saved our father from MI but forgot the warm blanket, etc.), reliant on no one but yourself... no one to guide you with your shiny new license. Pretty presumptuous to ask, why aren't more older nurses doing bedside when you don't have real experience and pressures of doing this day-in-day-out (esp. with management breathing down your neck).

    Clinical placements are NOT real nursing experience, no matter how you try and sell it... it's not the damn same!!! Have the humility and self-awareness to realize this .

    Short answer to the OPs question would be this:

    -They're gone B/C they're effing tired, that's why.
    Last edit by CaffeinePOQ4HPRN on Dec 24, '16
  4. Visit  Biker53 profile page
    #68 4
    For what its worth, as a patient I prefer older nurses. They have an emotional maturity that not all twenty somethings have.
  5. Visit  CaffeinePOQ4HPRN profile page
    #69 2
    Quote from Biker53
    For what its worth, as a patient I prefer older nurses. They have an emotional maturity that not all twenty somethings have.
    Interesting perspective, but in reality not true and it's ageist... maturity (emotional, psychological, etc...) is generally learned rather than instinctive; and not something that automatically correlates with age. I always suggest others to be cautious when attempting to set an alleged proxy for maturity/competence (ex. chronological age).

    I'm sure many people on this forum can lend stories of experience with nurses (younger and older) who demonstrated immaturity. Whenever I encounter an older nurse who demonstrates immature behaviour, I even find myself to be shocked because I too sometimes harbor the false belief that because someone is older that automatically they will be more mature and professional... which is obviously not true. It's a good reflective practice moment to manage our expectations of others, and evaluate/examine our individual beliefs-systems .
    Last edit by CaffeinePOQ4HPRN on Dec 25, '16
  6. Visit  remorej profile page
    #70 0
    My current job is at an allergy clinic (first nursing job) and 90% of my coworkers are all 60+. It does have the reg 8hr day shifts M-F, which I know fits their preferences since they've been in hospital for many years previously. I find the hours great but will eventually move onto bedside care in the future.
  7. Visit  Grasshopper11 profile page
    #71 1
    Where I work, we have a really nice supervisor/charge nurse that is older. She is ready to quit but unfortunately she has a mortgage to pay. The twenty-somethings bully her to death just because she is older. It has been reported to management but nothing happens. She is so stressed out. So if you are wondering where the older nurses are, they probably get fed-up and quit.
  8. Visit  sherri64 profile page
    #72 0
    Quote from tjcnurse
    I'm a new nursing student. 2nd career. I'm 48. I've been doing a lot of student shadowing at my local hospital in the different departments lately and its been amazing! Everything from NICU to Cardiac Cath lab the whole gambit. One trend is a lot of 20 something early 30 something nurses. Both male and female. Primarily female. All very professional and knowledgeable. What happens to the 40 to 70 year olds? They make so much money they retire early? haha really?
    They burn out or get injured from consistently working short and find something else to do within the nursing field besides direct care or they quit and do something else. That has been my experience with nurses I know. And I know a lot of them from all over the country.
  9. Visit  Allgood2016 profile page
    #73 1
    I am 60 years old; and an LVN; with 40 plus years experience. Due to hiring trends in my area (and, all over the United States ) hospitals don't hire us "old gals & guys". Therefore I; and, my "older"sister & brothers nurses are only able (in my words forced) to work in a)LTC/Nursinghomes/Rehab facilities; b) work for nursing agencies; or c) physicians offices or clinics.
    That's where us "older " nurses are.
  10. Visit  Allgood2016 profile page
    #74 1
    Hospitals discriminate based on how many letter after your name (LVN/LPN vs RN) and age. This has been going on for many years.
    "LVN/LPNS aren't knowledgeable enough /trained like RNS are; and its cheaper to hire a new nurse, than an older nurse" said to me by a hospital CEO/administrator who didn't know I was an LVN with 40 plus years experience until after he made the statement.
    That's the discrimination.
  11. Visit  isleyele profile page
    #75 1
    I spent my first 5 years as a hospital staff nurse. I was a "second-career" new grad and in my 40s. My colleagues on the floor were mostly sweet young things who were, 99% of them, fabulously competent and compassionate caregivers...but they were mostly clueless when it came to common sense. (And most of the nurse managers were like scared rabbits--scared of losing their cushy job, scared of setting boundaries with families, and certainly scared of fellow nurses who didn't just keep their heads down.) Who works those crazy hours while being constantly belittled and abused, not only by nurse managers, but also by doctors and patient families? Older nurses don't work in hospitals because with age comes WISDOM. There are myriad rewarding nursing jobs where you actually use your critical thinking and patient skills and don't have to learn an HCAHPS-approved script or grab rounds of sodas for entire families. Do your time on the floor and move on.
  12. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    #76 1
    Quote from isleyele
    I spent my first 5 years as a hospital staff nurse. I was a "second-career" new grad and in my 40s. My colleagues on the floor were mostly sweet young things who were, 99% of them, fabulously competent and compassionate caregivers...but they were mostly clueless when it came to common sense. (And most of the nurse managers were like scared rabbits--scared of losing their cushy job, scared of setting boundaries with families, and certainly scared of fellow nurses who didn't just keep their heads down.) Who works those crazy hours while being constantly belittled and abused, not only by nurse managers, but also by doctors and patient families? Older nurses don't work in hospitals because with age comes WISDOM. There are myriad rewarding nursing jobs where you actually use your critical thinking and patient skills and don't have to learn an HCAHPS-approved script or grab rounds of sodas for entire families. Do your time on the floor and move on.
    I'm in my sixties, and have been a nurse since the 70s. I work crazy hours, but don't find myself constantly belittled and abused by nurse managers, physicians or the patients' families. Older nurses DO work in hospitals, because with age comes wisdom and with wisdom comes the ability to rise above, ignore or rise above "abuse" from patients and families who don't know any better and to inspire the respect from one's colleagues that prevents them from belittling or abusing you. I actually use my wisdom, critical thinking and patient skills at the bedside and have learned to direct entire families to the cafeteria where they can purchase the soda of their choice.
  13. Visit  martymoose profile page
    #77 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I actually use my wisdom, critical thinking and patient skills at the bedside and have learned to direct entire families to the cafeteria where they can purchase the soda of their choice.
    But they want it for free and for you to serve it to them on ice. They dont want to have to walk to the cafeteria.....


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