What would you say to this shocking patient statement? - pg.3 | allnurses

What would you say to this shocking patient statement? - page 3

Obese female in her forties admitted from the ED for asthma, allergy list a mile long, takes medication for anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, migraines, chronic back pain, etc. Has packed her comfy... Read More

  1. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    1
    Quote from ktwlpn
    QUOTE>>> Obese female in her forties admitted from the ED for asthma, allergy list a mile long, takes medication for anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, migraines, chronic back pain, etc. Has packed her comfy jammies, memory foam pillow, iPad, laptop, and cell phone, and before she has even entered the room she needs the facility WiFi password and a pass to the cafeteria because she hasn’t eaten all day.
    This is just me venting and trying not to sound too judgmental. This actually happens all the time and I am used to "professional patients". I just wanted to paint a metal image for what this patient said while I was admitting her.>>> QUOTE As others have posted you clearly revealed your own bigotry in your first paragraph. I will add that "professional patients" often know their bodies and how they will react to treatment very well.How many of us here on allnurses have presented to the ED ,asked for a certain med and been labeled a drug seeker? There are several threads about that.Maybe she has discovered that foreign born physicians are not as open to her particiption in her plan of care. Her requests are not that surprising-I am sure the meds she received in the ED stabilized her,she probably felt too sick to eat prior to coming in so upon arriving to the floor she was feeling better and wanted to eat.Given her history the internet is probably her lifeline. I take me own pillow ,face cloth,Nook and stuff when I go on vacay and will probably do so if I am ever hospitilized.Does any of this change your perspective of this patient? The term "professional patient" implies malingerer imho-is that what you mean? Anyone with a slew of chronic diseases if well used to acute care and I'm sure wants their creature comforts.Would you say the same thing about a 26 yr old man with metastatic cancer who arrives with his lap top,cd player amd such?

    I don't know that she is being purely biased by using the word "obese." This is a word used scientifically, just as moderately or morbidly obeses are scientific terms. Something you would definitely see in and H&P for heaven's sake. I get what she means by mental picture now. I don't know about the rest of it, as patients can be manipulative, or somethings, they are truly sick but they are, well, the way they are.

    Often enough asthma patients are frequent flyers; so they may well know the drill and want to be comfortable.

    And who knows why the woman thinks the way she does?

    I personally just think it is the quality of the caregiver that should be judged above all else.

    Dude, if the the best, most thorough doc there is a male or female from the Land of East MudFlappionia, is 65 or 75 years old, but is sharp as a knife and has agile skills, that's who I want caring for me. Everything is bull crap.

    To the OP's original point, if you are really sick, so long as you don't get a total quack, you just want treatment and relief. Darn, it's like when you are in truly major pain--like one of those unremitting migraines--no relief through vomitting--and the pain is so bad that your BP is 240/140. You could care less, so long as you get proper treatment and relief.

    But it is also a point that half of the ED admissions or more as such that can be dealt with in a physician's office or in an urgent care center. When you have to divide yourself between people coming in bleeding out or actively infarcting, plus children in respiratory distress or rape trauma, it is a pain in the butt to have to deal with so many non-urgent cases. The ED gets smacked with everything, and people don't get that. Even in the ICU, for the most part, you have to be able to justify giving the bed to someone--in terms of space and in terms of financial costs. But the ED, shoot, they just keep getting everything, while too often, also getting hits of a true emergent nature. It's part of what makes the ED a major pain in the butt.
    simonemesina likes this.
  2. Visit  medic0681 profile page
    1
    wow..what a piece of ****!
    Novo likes this.
  3. Visit  Alibaba profile page
    6
    Oh that's too bad you did not get the care you wanted over there.
    Well let's see who is rounding today,,,there Dr. (insert very difficult to pronounce Indian name here), then the attending is (Insert another foreign name here), residents are (even more foreign sounding names here). Charge nurse is (insert foreign sounding name here), and so on and so on...
    Then apologize to her royal highness for not having ANY non foreign Docs on all night.
    Excuse yourself and have one of your brown skinned accent having coworkers go in to see if she was comfortable or needed anything.
    Would have been fun just for laughs..

    Like someone said, you can not fix stupid, but you sure can have fun at stupid's expense.
    simonemesina, wooh, aboucherrn, and 3 others like this.
  4. Visit  yoshells profile page
    1
    After restraining myself of speaking my mind and knowing my face is free and clear of dirty looks (My face tends to have a mind of its own sometimes) I would have probably told her that she has the right to choose her doctor as well. I myself am brown in skin color but was born here in america. Initially I would be upset but then I have to think that people like that do not deserve to be even an afterthought. Its just sad that we are in this day and age where there is still that ignorant mentality.
    Last edit by yoshells on Sep 9, '12 : Reason: weird color typing
    Psychtrish39 likes this.
  5. Visit  edatri profile page
    4
    I suppose cultural diversity includes those who don't practice it. Being brown skinned, I'd probably just stick with the catch-all "I'm sorry you feel that way" and keep going with the assessment.
    tewdles, sauconyrunner, nrsang97, and 1 other like this.
  6. Visit  Aurora77 profile page
    9
    I'd want to ask if I should get her AMA paperwork ready now or wait until after she's met her hospitalist.
    Altra, chaka_1709, caroladybelle, and 6 others like this.
  7. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Quote from Aurora77
    I'd want to ask if I should get her AMA paperwork ready now or wait until after she's met her hospitalist.

    LOL Have it off to the side--try to streamline. LOL
  8. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    2
    Quote from yoshells
    After restraining myself of speaking my mind and knowing my face is free and clear of dirty looks (My face tends to have a mind of its own sometimes) I would have probably told her that she has the right to choose her doctor as well. I myself am brown in skin color but was born here in america. Initially I would be upset but then I have to think that people like that do not deserve to be even an afterthought. Its just sad that we are in this day and age where there is still that ignorant mentality.

    LOL I have one of those kind of faces too--it has a mind of its own. Have to work extra hard to make sure it's "in check." I think I should learn how to play poker well. Don't have a poker face, but having one would have served me better over the years. It's either that or take meds to make me have a flat affect, lol. Nah.
    libbyliberal and nrsang97 like this.
  9. Visit  gatoraims RN profile page
    1
    Quote from edatri
    I suppose cultural diversity includes those who don't practice it. Being brown skinned, I'd probably just stick with the catch-all "I'm sorry you feel that way" and keep going with the assessment.
    I would have said the same thing. I might add in something about knowing any competent doctors from every walk of life.

    Those of you who would "put her in her place" are not helping the mater. I do not think she is going to change her mind or even have a different way of think when presented with rudeness. I know it might be a long shot but just bluntly telling her you do not agree and being professional about it may go further than being rude.
    tewdles likes this.
  10. Visit  That Guy profile page
    1
    I wonder what her insurance has to say about leaving AMA due to race of the doctor....
    sckimrn likes this.
  11. Visit  Poochiewoochie profile page
    5
    Funny, but the patient that was described is the type of patient I see a lot of negative comments made about here and on various medical blogs. Not condoning what she did but there is an old saying-those who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. A lot of people in the medical field need to get over their prejudice towards those that are obese and are so called "frequent flyers".
    sckimrn, tewdles, noahsmama, and 2 others like this.
  12. Visit  Been there,done that profile page
    2
    I thought your response was more than adequate. The nurses responsibility is to provide a healing environment for the patient..

    not to attempt to judge/correct their social intolerance.

    The patient is a borderline personality.... the more you feed into that, the bigger hole you dig for yourself.
    jadelpn and tewdles like this.
  13. Visit  libbyliberal profile page
    0
    So the woman left a hospital AMA because:

    "they had brown skin and heavy Indian accents. I'm an American and if I go to a hospital in America I demand to have an American doctor."

    My response would be: you'll probably want to sign out of here then too.

    Then go on with business as usual with an AMA form handy. Might take some bets on how long it takes for her to sign out.


Visit Our Sponsors
Top
close
close