Nursing: Culture of inclusion, or culture of exclusion? - page 3

by CapricaNurse

3,334 Views | 21 Comments

Nurses are said to be the most trusted professionals. I've been in nursing a long time, and over that time I've heard many patients and staff express agreement with that evaluation. I've also heard a few nurses disagree strongly.... Read More


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    I was raised in an environment where I could say whatever I wanted to say...I just had to watch how I said it. Of course we should tell nurses, experienced and new, the truth about their performance on the job. A patient's life might very well depend on doing so. However, who says this cannot be done with some class? I am sorry and ashamed to say that I have seen many nurses, male and female, treat each other poorly over the course of my career. I have been a Pediatric RN for 26 yrs and recently crossed over into adult medicine. I did this to become a better teacher...which is the end goal. I feel like a new RN in this foreign environment and I have not always been treated well or even professionally. Twenty six years ago the behavior I have seen would have made me cry...today it just makes me so angry I could spit. I respect the knowledge these adult medicine nurses have but being a good RN doesn't make one a good teacher/preceptor. I will admit that I underestimated how hard adult medicine nurses work and the extent of their knowledge base. But I am working hard and I will catch up. I have been told that it will not take me long to "lose my smile and mushy attitude". Wanna bet.
    GrnTea likes this.
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    Quote from CapricaNurse
    .... I'm not sure that cultural purity and silencing dissent are ideal. If history is any indicator, they are far more toxic than one person's opinion.
    "Tolerance", "diversity", and "acceptance", have been the employment mandates for the past 25-odd years. Turnover in the profession is still high, compensation comparatively low, and satisfaction reports, from any given corporate facility, are also fairly low.

    Press-Ganey's model of scripted service, and check-point satisfaction ratings are designed to remove the personal impact of patient care/sercvice, and replace it with a homogeneous, "purified" model- that we all recognize as dysfunctional.

    Referring to history, and using the School of Business' own research- effective leaders are "born", not made. Granted, ego-dynasties are dangerous things, but having an empiracle professional model of responsibility, strong ethics, and positive outlook negates that risk.

    We do not have such a professional model, we have a "customer service model", in which all members are equally disposable, unless insulated by sufficient layers of bureaucratic incompetence.
    CapricaNurse likes this.


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