Nurse Mobbing/bullying - page 7

:balloons: I am new to the forum and would like to get feedback from others who have experienced mobbing/bullying/harassment in the healthcare field. Please share so others might learn more about... Read More

  1. by   bloviate
    Quote from jenruth
    I have to laugh. Stand up to a bully and watch them go whine to management. I respond to these cowards with, "Nothing to do today?" This statement really sets them off, and often sends them squealing to some supervisor. I've been called rude, mean, etc... The poor darlings can make work a living hell for their co-workers, but they can't stand it when anyone challenges them.

    I have gotten sick and tired of these stupid games.

    I am trying very hard to get into anesthesia school.

    I am working as little as possible and at varying facilities.

    It's harder to hit a moving target.

    Sincerely B
  2. by   1Tulip
    The director of nurses threw a chart at me when I started a new job as an LPN

    That's assault and is a crime. If the chart actually hit you it's assault with battery. I know a nurse that caught a chart to the forehead thrown by a doctor. She didn't call her supervisor. She called the police. They responded right away and took her seriously. MD was charged and almost lost his license.
  3. by   TypicalFish
    The worst experience I had was a surgeon who spent the entire case making comments about my chest-I was pregnant, and well, they were pretty big-I kept saying well< I 'm pregnant, so why don't we change the topic. I was assisting, so I couldn't leave. The PA and anesthesiologist just giggled. I just clammed up and wouldn't reply. After the case, I was by myself, breaking down the room and he came up from behind me and pulled at my scrub gown, making comments, I freaked and ran out of the room. The DON would not do anything, and pressured me by saying the last nurse who wrote an incident report about him lost her job, and that the PA and anesthesiologist said that no one said anything, so I would be on my own, my word against theirs (!) Since I was 24 and expecting my first child-I let it go. Looking back now, I am so mad at myself for taking it! If that happened now, all hell would break loose; I certainly would of done something, job or no job.
  4. by   chadash
    Quote from LuciGirl
    I am new to the forum and would like to get feedback from others who have experienced mobbing/bullying/harassment in the healthcare field. Please share so others might learn more about this issue that needs further exploration.
    I feel for you. I believe this is really the culture in healthcare. It will take education to change this.
    Last edit by chadash on Jun 27, '05
  5. by   Shastalee99
    Quote from destinystar
    red is my favorite color. i love red.you should see the decor in my home, red dishes, red chairs, i wear red dresses. looks so bright and cheery to me.
    my kitchen is red. i thought it would be too dark, but it's bright and nice in the winter and summer.
  6. by   LuciGirl
    Quote from bloviate
    I have gotten sick and tired of these stupid games.

    I am working as little as possible and at varying facilities.

    It's harder to hit a moving target.

    Sincerely B
    After 20 years in nursing and numerous jobs, I find myself again at a point where management refuses to discipline unethical, unprofessional behavior of some workers who seem to be the "untouchables". Disacknowledgement and minimization of my concerns about verbal abuse and excessive physical force used on young children and adolescents in a hospital behavioral health unit. I am shocked that I am being made out now to be "the only one that thinks there is a problem." Anybody else worked with children/adolescents in psychiatry and felt that coworkers were abusive. Help. My heart is breaking for these children. The hospital is one of those that has a ton of banners and other advertisements about being a "TOP 100 HOSPITAL".
  7. by   HarryPotter
    Hi Luci: I have worked in psychiatry since 1973, many years on adolescent/children units as a manager. I don't have any answers for you, however, I would definately start a personal log of instances to patients and/or to you for "having a problem." If I were in your shoes, I would also begin looking elsewhere for work, unless you want to be crucified. I feel for the kids being treated like you report. Unfortunately, there may not be anything you can do about it at this time. Keep doing a great job while you are there. Be a role model for the kids. Let everyone know when their behavior is inappropriate without splitting, with either your peers or the kids. Don't get in the middle.
    Get out!!! Be a leader where ever you are or where ever you go. Good luck. So sorry.
  8. by   LuciGirl
    To: HarryPotter - Thanks for your reply. I am looking elsewhere for work, but feel like I'm "abandoning" the kids that come to the unit I work on. I am hopeful about a new approach to dealing with kids that mgt is looking into - just learned about it today, but still, I need a new environment of co-workers that are supportive and more positive.
  9. by   HarryPotter
    Quote from LuciGirl
    To: HarryPotter - Thanks for your reply. I am looking elsewhere for work, but feel like I'm "abandoning" the kids that come to the unit I work on. I am hopeful about a new approach to dealing with kids that mgt is looking into - just learned about it today, but still, I need a new environment of co-workers that are supportive and more positive.
    Hi Luci:

    You abviously have heart, otherwise you wouldn't have been bothered by the treatment the kids were getting in the first place, so I understand how you feel you would be "abandoning them" if you leave. My humble advise is to realize that if you have done everything possible to correct the problem and to care for the kids, that is all you can do. You might also look into your past and see if there are events and emotions about abandonment that may be playing a part in your feelings. I am not at all deminishing your feelings about the situation, but looking into your own personnal past might give you some freedom so you are not carrying around pain, like a burden.
    I am very interested about the new management style that you referred to and would love to know more about it.
    A work place that is positive and supportive is wonderful. Unfortunately, that is not often the case. Fortunately, you can create that by a committment to have it be so.
    Please write back and I am so glad that I made a difference for you.
    Harry
  10. by   LuciGirl
    There is a book called Restraint/Seclusion Free Environments that presents the Engagement Model and trauma focused care - very good book and this is the model the hospital "says" it is going to introduce. Good point about examining my own issues of abandonment - introspection always so very important esp for those of us working in mental health.
  11. by   hipab4hands
    [QUOTE=Thunderwolf]"Mean" nurses, "eating their young", "catty nurses", etc. This is the ongoing black eye nurses give themselves and their own profession. It has been going on forever.

    ******************************
    It's time to change the culture by holding nurses,including upper management, responsible for their behavior.

    Management can be forced to change by nurses, who are willing to take a stand. If it means filing complaints with Labor Boards, filing suits, etc., so be it.
    The last thing management wants is some state board or Judge taking a look at their behavior and being held accountable for it.
  12. by   HarryPotter
    Quote from LuciGirl
    There is a book called Restraint/Seclusion Free Environments that presents the Engagement Model and trauma focused care - very good book and this is the model the hospital "says" it is going to introduce. Good point about examining my own issues of abandonment - introspection always so very important esp for those of us working in mental health.
    Hi Luci:
    So good to hear from you. I remember my days of working in hospitals and the trainings I got....it is always better to intervene before things get out of hand....lots of times the kids would actually be scared or be pulled into riot like situations because of peer group pressure.
    When I worked in Phoenix as charge nurse, we had a incredible program on the point system (they earned points for many things and we graded them each hour). We gave them responsiblility for following the rules (like lights out, or not unplugging their curling iron, etc), we used "peer pressure" in that the entire group would have consequences if one person caused trouble and the group would come up with solutions. We would immediatly call a meeting of the entire group when something got out of hand. in all of these ways, we got them to organize themselves andd to come up with positive solutions in order to help one another and to behave. We taught them about consequences. We were always on the look out for kids would be talking in small groups and would go over to them immediatly to make sure they were not concocting some sceem or planning to run, or setting another kid up for being a scape goat. We had the kids make their own goals for their treatment plan, rather than give them the goals we thought they should have...I don't know where u work, but would love to share my experience and thoughts if appropriate. This was a great program and we seldom had any problems with the kids. I never remember a time when we had to do "take downs", though there was a more "critical" unit where we would put someone of they were a danger to self or others. Our unit was more open, though of course the kids could not leave until they earned enough points. Then they could leave witih a staff, or leave the hospital for a short tiime with their parents.
    We had the parents very involved with their treatment, and, in fact, insisted on it as part of the treatment plan.
    Thanks for being so open about looking at yourself.
    How old are u anyway???
    Love and God Bless,
    Harry
  13. by   LuciGirl
    Thanks for your correspondence re: child/adol psych nursing! I'm soon to be 45! Wow! 2 grown kids of my own. It is interesting to read that there were few takedowns/seclusions where you worked. I'm very very concerned at the declining attitude of staff on the unit I am leaving. I am going prn on the locked unit but will be working with children/adolescents in an outpatient behavioral health program for the same hospital which has a wonderful culture/environment.

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