A New Twist on a Familiar Complaint: Toxic EMPLOYEES - page 4

We've all complained about toxic workplaces and toxic managers. Now that I've been a manager myself for a while, I realize there is a type of healthcare worker whom I never even knew existed when I was a floor nurse: the toxic... Read More

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    Quote from mjlrn97
    That's just it, Steph.........only in our situation, it's the low-wage (and often low-wattage) employees who have us over a barrel, and they know it. How many smart, talented, educated people are willing to do hard menial labor for 8 bucks an hour, day in and day out, for years on end? Yes, there are some very conscientious workers at this level, and I praise God every day that I have more of them than the other kind. But all too often, you get what you pay for, and I cringe inside when I'm interviewing potential staff members because the BEST I can offer them is $9.15 an hour to start, even they've got years of experience. We're asking them to care for frail human beings, yet we pay them no more than a burger-flipper at McDumpster.

    But that's a matter for a whole 'nother thread.
    One of the things they've done at my facility is to start classes so a few of our ancillary/support staff can train to become nurse's aides. So you can get a job as a housekeeper or dietary assistant with just a high school diploma, but eventually advance to one of our better paying non-licensed jobs. This hasn't worked miracles, exactly, but I think some employees do feel more motivated if they can see a way to advance themselves.
    Some of our best aides have no desire to do anything else, but some of our best are nursing students. Again, I think a lot of people can stay more motivated in a low-paying, thankless job if they can see it as a stepping stone toward a better-paying, thankless job. Not that it's a cure-all, either. The problem, I suppose, is that those who don't care about the job they have aren't likely to care much about advancing, either. I do think OJT and tuition assistance can do a lot to keep conscientious, motivated employees from getting burnt out, though.

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    Quote from nursemike
    One of the things they've done at my facility is to start classes so a few of our ancillary/support staff can train to become nurse's aides. So you can get a job as a housekeeper or dietary assistant with just a high school diploma, but eventually advance to one of our better paying non-licensed jobs. This hasn't worked miracles, exactly, but I think some employees do feel more motivated if they can see a way to advance themselves.
    Some of our best aides have no desire to do anything else, but some of our best are nursing students. Again, I think a lot of people can stay more motivated in a low-paying, thankless job if they can see it as a stepping stone toward a better-paying, thankless job. Not that it's a cure-all, either. The problem, I suppose, is that those who don't care about the job they have aren't likely to care much about advancing, either. I do think OJT and tuition assistance can do a lot to keep conscientious, motivated employees from getting burnt out, though.
    We have a CNA class and LVN class at our hospital.

    We also have teleconferencing for the RN program at Shasta College.

    However, you have to pay enough money to keep people from going to the big city for higher hourly pay.

    We've lost a few LVN's and RN's that we actually helped through school to the big city.

    steph
  3. 0
    let not your heart be troubled.
  4. 0
    Does anyone else believe that keeping these toxic types around causes way more problems than it solves in the long run? Yes, if Mr/Ms. Toxic is fired, then a replacement will need to be found to replace that individual. Keeping Mr/Ms. Toxic on staff often helps to drive many others off the unit, especially new grads or more passive types of people. Then many people will need to be replaced. I know this needs to come from the top, but I think we need to start considering the toll these people take on the rest of the staff. I can think of one particular med-surg nurse I knew who was just foul. She ate new nurses, float nurses, and agency for lunch over and over again. Yet, she was in charge all of the time and really wasn't even terribly skilled clinically. She ran to managemnt all of the time, ranting about other people when she was usually the problem!!!
  5. 0
    Quote from imenid37
    Does anyone else believe that keeping these toxic types around causes way more problems than it solves in the long run? Yes, if Mr/Ms. Toxic is fired, then a replacement will need to be found to replace that individual. Keeping Mr/Ms. Toxic on staff often helps to drive many others off the unit, especially new grads or more passive types of people. Then many people will need to be replaced.
    Yes!! Yes!! Yes!! I've seen it and I've been one who left. Too much of a toll on me to try to keep making nice with these types. I just want to go in, do my job, and go home.


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