LATERAL Violence. How Nurses treat Nurses! - page 20

by NREMT-P/RN

hi! i have had a very interesting experience with the aacn's "healthy work environments" initiative. it really does seem that one just had to "name it to claim it!" i have posted an excerpt from the aacn's on-line and... Read More


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    As someone who has always been the target of bullies initially, I would say it usually is my own fault because I will not stoop to their level:wink2: I left my original unit because of a very mean day shift charge RN, but I was new grad and at that time I didn't have the snappy replies down pat. Unfortunately, on my current floor there is a night charge RN who truly takes the cake.

    This nurse spends the entire night running around the unit, making mountains out of molehills, she never takes a new admit, takes the smallest assignment, tells the one CNA that they'll only be on one side, not both, then when they've done all the pt's up, she'll move them to the other side. She forces the other nurses to help her pass meds in the am, and usually clocks out 1 hr OT. One of the night nurses got an emergency call on her cell phone and charge RN wrote her up for talking on her cell phone in the nurses station. She used to make walking rounds into INTERROGATION. I recenty had my evaluation and I has some points taken off because "You left things out of shift report, one of the night nurses complained." I am on good terms with all of the overnight nurses, and none of them had any complaints. I work 3-11 and have been a nurse for 4 years, I am sure you guys can relate, able to give report in my sleep.

    I am not sure how much my manager understands about the true dynamics of the floor on that shift, I'm pretty sure she has heard a lot of different people complain, on my old floor the manager was either unable to fix the problem or in denial.

    I am tired of running away, I am planning to talk with my manager about it.

    Rebecca
    canigraduate and RN1982 like this.
  2. 0
    This will be short and I am not only speaking as a nurse, but as a mom. This won't be your last problem in your life. You are young and will have to learn that stress is inevitable. Know it, embrace it, deal with it, move on.

    As far as letting people down, oh well.... Nobody died. You know better for next time--don't do it again. But get over it.

    Life us tough, but your perspective will change as you mature. You will be fine. Take your vitamins, eat well and get rest. Spend time with hubby --go have fun.....

    Jo
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    Quote from JoPACURN
    This will be short and I am not only speaking as a nurse, but as a mom. This won't be your last problem in your life. You are young and will have to learn that stress is inevitable. Know it, embrace it, deal with it, move on.

    As far as letting people down, oh well.... Nobody died. You know better for next time--don't do it again. But get over it.

    Life us tough, but your perspective will change as you mature. You will be fine. Take your vitamins, eat well and get rest. Spend time with hubby --go have fun.....

    Jo
    I think all that you have to say is true, but I would also say that as long as everyone sees bullying and verbal aggression and violence as acceptable, survivable and even rather minor then nothing will change. This is violence and until nurses are prepared to face their own dirty laundry nothing will change.
    Sexist comments and racist jokes used to be acceptable too. Women (and I saw women because nursing is still heavily a female oriented profession) need to grow up. This isn't high school... or any other school. This is our job, our profession and at the end of the day its also a significant part of how we are viewed as a profession.
    Bullying is immature, it is petty but it is also extremely damaging and it is and should be unacceptable to everyone. It contributes to a poor work environment, to the stress in an already stressful job and to the numbers of talented people who leave our profession, some within the first year of graduation.
    I don't know when verbal intimidation was ever considered a valid means of education, or communication. But it is no longer considered an acceptable part of even high school so I think nurses need to get over themselves!
    I am joining this profession and intend to build a lasting career, and part of that for me is to state I will not tolerate verbal intimidation and or even passive aggression as an acceptable part of my work environment, I wonder how much different nursing could be if everyone were prepared to take the same stand.
    Bullying demeans everyone and it is not normal or healthy and yet it is so prevalent in nursing that it has its own title within the nursing profession. I for one will continue to strive to make it an ugly chapter in the history of nursing because its not now nor should ever be so prevalent that it has its own studies, strategies or even threads on an all nursing message board.
  4. 3
    To be deemed 'violent' doesn't mean there must be blood shed!

    http://www.who.int/violence_injury_p...rld_report/en/

    "The World Health Organization defines violence (2) as: The intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment or deprivation."

    The WHO's 2002 Report on Violence and Health, also included the following;

    "A comprehensive approach to preventing violence at work

    Violence in the workplace is a major contributor to death and injury in many parts of the world. In the United States of America, official statistics have placed homicide as the second single leading cause of death in the workplace --- after road traffic injuries --- for men, and the first for women. In the European Union, an estimated 3 million workers (2% of the labor force) have been subjected to physical violence at work. Studies on female migrant workers from the Philippines have shown that many, especially those working in domestic service or the entertainment industry, are disproportionately affected by violence within their work.

    Violence at work involves not only physical but also psychological behaviour. Many workers are subjected to bullying, sexual harassment, threats, intimidation and other forms of psychological violence. Research in the United Kingdom has found that 53% of employees have suffered bullying at work and 78% have witnessed such behavior. In South Africa, workplace hostilities have been reported as ‘‘abnormally high’’ and a recent study showed that 78% of those surveyed had at some time experienced bullying within the workplace. Repeated acts of violence --- from bullying, sexual harassment, and threats to humiliate and undermine workers --- may also develop cumulatively into very serious cases. In Sweden, it is estimated that such behaviour has been a factor in 10--15% of suicides.

    The costs Violence in the workplace causes immediate and often long-term disruption to interpersonal relationships and to the whole working environment. The costs of such violence include:
    * Direct costs --- stemming from such things as:
    — accidents;
    — illness;
    — disability and death;
    — absenteeism;
    — turnover of staff.
    * Indirect costs, including:
    — reduced work performance;
    — a lower quality of products or service and slower production;
    — decreased competitiveness.
    * More intangible costs, including:
    — damage to the image of an organization;
    — decreased motivation and morale;
    — diminished loyalty to the organization;
    — lower levels of creativity;
    — an environment that is less conducive to work.
    The responses As in dealing with violence in other settings, a comprehensive approach is required. Violence at work is not simply an individual problem that happens from time to time, but a structural problem with much wider socioeconomic, cultural and organizational causes. The traditional response to violence at work, based exclusively on the enforcement of regulations, fails to reach many situations in the workplace. A more comprehensive approach focuses on the causes of violence in the workplace. Its aim is to make the health, safety and well-being of workers integral parts of the development of the organization.

    The type of systematic and targeted package to prevent violence at work that is being increasingly adopted includes:
    — the active collaboration of workers’ and employers’ organizations in formulating clear anti-violence workplace policies and programmes;
    — supporting legislation and guidelines from national and local government;
    — the dissemination of case studies of good practice in preventing violence at work;
    — improvements to the working environment, styles of management and the organization of work;
    — greater opportunities for training;
    — counseling and support for those affected.
    By directly linking health and safety with the management and development of an organization, this comprehensive approach offers the means of prompt and sustainable action to eliminate violence in the workplace."

    Perhaps this may enlighten you Sparkplug to the destruction caused by "strong personalities" and how your comments "melodramatic" and attitude is an affront to anyone who has ever been subjected to violence in the workplace.


    Sparkplug wrote Jun 28, 2007, 03:59 PM

    Re: LATERAL Violence. How Nurses treat Nurses!
    "Isn't the word 'violence' a little strong? No, I've never experienced violence at work. Yes, I've encountered gossip, cliques, and some strong personalities. I don't call that violence, that sounds like a melodramatic overstatement to me."


    Ignorance isn't an excuse. Passive dismissal of such situations makes you an accessory to the violence.
    Last edit by Titania2009 on Nov 16, '09 : Reason: editing
    trixie333, tewdles, and lamazeteacher like this.
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    Titania: No one should be made to put up with those things!

    It's good that you left the employ of one place. What do you think it is, that followed you to the next one?

    Violence is any occurrence caused by one person using extreme pressure (not necessarily physical) on another, and must be reported every time!
    Last edit by lamazeteacher on Nov 16, '09 : Reason: addition
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    You know, I worked in other professions -- administrative and in marketing/communication type jobs for some 15 years before I came to nursing. And I will tell you this: There was absolutely NO SUCH THING as secretaries or admin types "bullying" each other, nor did one EVER hear of marketing folks "eating their young." Yes, there are office politics, but for the most part -- women are encouraged and promoted, treated like human beings and like PROFESSIONALS.

    Ladies in nursing -- you are UNBELIEVABLE -- those of you who bully, and those of you who allow it to happen. This is freaking 2009 and women over decades have fought long and hard for women to be treated as professionals, and to advance in the workplace! Have you even been listening or paying attention to the advances and strides women have made, even in the last 20 years or so?

    Your treatment of each other is counter professional. In doing this, and by condoning it, or by tolerating it, you demean this profession! No one -- not administrators, not doctors, not anyone is going to take YOU seriously as a group until you stop this ridiculous practice.

    New grads are just that: college grads! These are young people, most of whom qualified to be accepted into challenging nursing programs -- and PASSED. Yet, you treat the "newbies" like idiots to be abused. These are intelligent young people, waiting to be mentored, taught, INSPIRED -- are you even up to it?

    I ask each and every one of you -- what have you done lately that has inspired a new graduate RN to stay, to learn, to be their best??
    BabyLady, DesertRN2, Lovely_RN, and 3 others like this.
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    Wow, obviously this post has touched ALOT of nerves.

    Some defend the way students are "meanly" treated. With the defense "maybe they don't want to instruct students" WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!! How did they learn to be a nurse???? ....born that way

    Yeah its stressful....if ya can't handle the heat, get out of the kitchen....After 25+ yrs. many are burnt out, why don't ya get out.???? I just got into nursing, spent almost 30+yrs in past job, I was burnt out, hated training, etc etc. Took me a while to realize, I was miserable, and making everyone around me miserable. Tough decision, but couldn't be happier now. It's never too late to go back to school and do something else. It can be done, I'm living proof!!!!

    some say "I just want to put in my 8,10,12hrs and go home"....don't want students...have you effectively communicated this to your supervisor?????? I love students, it only takes a short time to assess them, find their strengths and capitalize on that. As a student, I clearly remember the nurses who were moody and took out their problems on me. I still see these nurses at work, I'm not rude to them, I treat them professionally, yet I don't go out of my way to help them, and yes, it stems from the way they treated me when I was a student. It is not hostile, but it is cool.
    Ironically, these nurses are still rude, moody, and still have their same issues. It had nothing to do with me, they just don't know how to make a change I guess.

    I learned in nursing school, a person criticizes others to make that person look less capable, they think it makes them look more capable. In most cases, the criticizer is a very capable and good nurse, they just haven't learned to be humble.
    I know this "lateral violence" can either end or begin with me, I choose to end it. Stop the gossip and lose those "all knowing" looks. Extend a hand, give a hug, smile... if you find errors/mistakes, go to the source, it probably really is a knowledge deficit....teach...your a nurse...
    lamazeteacher and Titania2009 like this.
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    I must admit the first few pages of this thread have some post which are absolutely disgusting!

    If you don't want a student, here is an idea, instead of acting like you are in high school, go and speak to your manager about it, someone who can actually do something about it.

    And as far as saying using the term violence is melodramtic? Well it is because of attitudes like that that are perpetuating it.
    Violence is what it is.

    There are many more things that I wanted to say, but I'm just gobsmacked at the way some nurses here are actually defending this behavior. I think that some nurses need to do some introspection about their own practice.
    Mahage and Titania2009 like this.
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    Quote from lamazeteacher
    Titania: No one should be made to put up with those things!

    It's good that you left the employ of one place. What do you think it is, that followed you to the next one?

    Violence is any occurrence caused by one person using extreme pressure (not necessarily physical) on another, and must be reported every time!
    The incident at my first place of employment, was handled appropriately by my manager. The person who bullied/harassed me, had never done anything like that before. I didn't leave that position because of "lateral violence." I left because I needed shorter hours, going through a divorce and having residential custody of my children required I find a different position.

    Your comment as to "followed you to the next one" I think stems from my comments of allowing people to treat me in such a way at work, was astonishing to me. Since I had finally decided to get out of a verbally abusive marriage.

    Thanks for your comments and concerns. I do appreciate them.
    lamazeteacher likes this.
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    this is what makes me very scared to go into the nursing profession.


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