Dear new grad... - page 2

by smurfynursey

6,210 Views | 35 Comments

Dear new grad, I am sorry (sort of) that you did not get your dream job in a hospital and you are here instead. I know it may come as a shock, but not everyone starts in the ICU/ER...nor does everyone want to. Just because I... Read More


  1. 0
    Amen to that OP!
  2. 12
    Dear, dear SNF nurse--

    No, you are right. You are not just a nurse. You are a councilor, a guardian, and someone who shoulders burdens for those that just cannot anymore.

    I wish I could find the words to thank you for what you do--to tell you the level of deep regard that I hold for you. When my grandfather was lost in his own mind, it was nurses such as yourself that guided him back, coaxed him to eat, bathed him, and learned who he was to calm him with but a word or a gesture. Thank you for being forward thinkers, brilliant and clever to come up with a way to get medication into an elderly man who sustained himself on nothing but cheese balls and chocolate milk and flat out refused his pills. Thank you for making him comfortable until Alzheimer's took him from us. Thank you for holding my mother when she would cry with heartache at her father failing to recognize her and I was too far away to get to her.

    No, SNF nursing may be all the flash and bang of an ICU or a trauma center, but it is its own entity of sophistication layered with emotional and psychological challenges.

    Just....thank you.

    Thank you.

    ~~CheesePotato~~
    CT Pixie, nguyency77, CMA2013, and 9 others like this.
  3. 1
    I just finished bridging from LVN to RN. I have been in pediatric home health for 9 years. I am absolutely passionate about what I do. While explaining exactly what phh is, the person I was speaking to said: "Oh, like babysitting only the kid is sick. I didn't go to nursing school to babysit." I found that to be offensive. Nursing is not a career you should choose to make yourself feel important.

    Thanks for posting.

    -K
    konoha likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from CheesePotato
    Dear, dear SNF nurse--

    No, you are right. You are not just a nurse. You are a councilor, a guardian, and someone who shoulders burdens for those that just cannot anymore.

    I wish I could find the words to thank you for what you do--to tell you the level of deep regard that I hold for you. When my grandfather was lost in his own mind, it was nurses such as yourself that guided him back, coaxed him to eat, bathed him, and learned who he was to calm him with but a word or a gesture. Thank you for being forward thinkers, brilliant and clever to come up with a way to get medication into an elderly man who sustained himself on nothing but cheese balls and chocolate milk and flat out refused his pills. Thank you for making him comfortable until Alzheimer's took him from us. Thank you for holding my mother when she would cry with heartache at her father failing to recognize her and I was too far away to get to her.

    No, SNF nursing may be all the flash and bang of an ICU or a trauma center, but it is its own entity of sophistication layered with emotional and psychological challenges.

    Just....thank you.

    Thank you.

    ~~CheesePotato~~
    Very Sweet of you to post this. Thanks. Even, though I'm not currently a LTC nurse, I have such a high respect for them.
    Some of my favorite nursing memories was when I worked in LTC as a LPN.
    konoha likes this.
  5. 2
    As a new grad, I swore I'd never work nights, and I wasn't all that interested in any field that wasn't obstetrics. I ended up taking the first job I was offered -- orthopedics, straight nights. Guess what? I'm still in orthopedics six years later, and I've come to prefer nights over days. I think it's a mistake for a new nurse to turn down a job unless there's a really good reason, like feeling one's skills aren't up to par for a challenging floor such as the ICU. The managers in your dream field will look more kindly on someone with nursing experience.
    LTCangel and joanna73 like this.
  6. 1
    I see what you are saying. I however will be a new grad "again" in May. I really really do not want to go back to LTC. I respect what nurses working in LTC do but I see nothing wrong with me (or others) trying for their dream and turning down ( but why are they applying if they are just going to turn it down) LTC. I however do not think I am above it and will apply if my dream job does not fall into my lap after a few months of trying.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  7. 5
    Last week my Mom's goals of care at her LTC facility were changed to comfort measures only. I am so grateful for the nurse who has taken my calls every day, or called me herself to give me a daily update when I cannot be there. For the nurse who called in on her days off just to see how Mom was doing. For the nurse who has looked after her for over 5 years who wasn't afraid to shed some tears with me. For the nurse manager who told me to page her anytime, even if all I need is a hug. For the aides who come every 60-90 minutes when she needs to be turned and don't complain about doing so. For all the staff that realize that I am not trying to be the miserable nurse daughter when I insist that the on call doctor be called for better pain management, but that this is my Mom and making sure she is comfortable is one of the last things I can do for her. LTC nursing takes a special kind of person, and I am glad that that person is working with my Mom this week. I would never consider LTC nurses "less" than hospital nurses, it is different skill set and focus, but still an essential part of the healthcare team. I am very grateful for them and their special skills this week.
    CT Pixie, CMA2013, LTCangel, and 2 others like this.
  8. 1
    I don't think this is particularly fair. I certainly don't feel that working in long-term care is beneath me. But getting experience in acute care will open up many more doors for me than long-term care will. Though if I could find a SNF that hired nurses without acute care experience, I'd certainly be all right with that (because again, many SNFs do require acute care experience).
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  9. 2
    I respectively disagree with the OP's sentiment. I don't see ANY part of Nursing as a Specialty being on a hierarchal spectrum. I still have many diversified interests as an ER RN and FNP. I love Trauma, PsychMH, Hospice In and Outpatient, Chemical Dependency, Pediatrics, Cardiology, and Neurology.

    I wouldn't let one misguided disgruntled New Grad persuade me to think they all think different about your specialties value. In fact, I see more saying "I will work "anywhere" possible!"

    Everyone has a valuable place with pointed experience that I couldn't do, if the only position that they could find is with me in ED I wouldn't hold it against them- even if they complained about unhappiness.

    Only you can give someone permission to be offensive with you. Sometimes empathy is divine, I'm not "made" for SNF. It's not "below" me, I lack the skills, ability to thrive, and tolerate the environment. Blessing to those that thrive there
    Last edit by BostonTerrierLoverRN on Dec 7, '12 : Reason: Clarification
    Not_A_Hat_Person and joanna73 like this.
  10. 4
    I've worked LTC for 2 years, started there as a new grad. What many people don't understand is that you see the same acuity now in LTC as you would in med surg. I've done that also, so I know. I'm soon ready for my next venture, and extremely appreciative of the well rounded experience I now have. As a new grad, I would have accepted ANY job, and made it work. Two years somewhere is not the end of the world, although some new grads would make it so. And guess what? Sitting at home waiting for that "dream job" is silly. Zero experience is going to result in....zero dollars and zero skills. I've always wanted to try travel nursing. When I do move on after 2+ years, there are many more options.


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