Dear new grad... - pg.2 | allnurses

Dear new grad... - page 2

Dear new grad, I am sorry (sort of) that you did not get your dream job in a hospital and you are here instead. I know it may come as a shock, but not everyone starts in the ICU/ER...nor does... Read More

  1. Visit  OnlybyHisgraceRN profile page
    1
    Quote from CheesePotato
    Dear, dear SNF nurse--

    No, you are right. You are not just a nurse. You are a councilor, a guardian, and someone who shoulders burdens for those that just cannot anymore.

    I wish I could find the words to thank you for what you do--to tell you the level of deep regard that I hold for you. When my grandfather was lost in his own mind, it was nurses such as yourself that guided him back, coaxed him to eat, bathed him, and learned who he was to calm him with but a word or a gesture. Thank you for being forward thinkers, brilliant and clever to come up with a way to get medication into an elderly man who sustained himself on nothing but cheese balls and chocolate milk and flat out refused his pills. Thank you for making him comfortable until Alzheimer's took him from us. Thank you for holding my mother when she would cry with heartache at her father failing to recognize her and I was too far away to get to her.

    No, SNF nursing may be all the flash and bang of an ICU or a trauma center, but it is its own entity of sophistication layered with emotional and psychological challenges.

    Just....thank you.

    Thank you.

    ~~CheesePotato~~
    Very Sweet of you to post this. Thanks. Even, though I'm not currently a LTC nurse, I have such a high respect for them.
    Some of my favorite nursing memories was when I worked in LTC as a LPN.
    konoha likes this.
  2. Visit  Clementia profile page
    2
    As a new grad, I swore I'd never work nights, and I wasn't all that interested in any field that wasn't obstetrics. I ended up taking the first job I was offered -- orthopedics, straight nights. Guess what? I'm still in orthopedics six years later, and I've come to prefer nights over days. I think it's a mistake for a new nurse to turn down a job unless there's a really good reason, like feeling one's skills aren't up to par for a challenging floor such as the ICU. The managers in your dream field will look more kindly on someone with nursing experience.
    LTCangel and joanna73 like this.
  3. Visit  gatoraims RN profile page
    1
    I see what you are saying. I however will be a new grad "again" in May. I really really do not want to go back to LTC. I respect what nurses working in LTC do but I see nothing wrong with me (or others) trying for their dream and turning down ( but why are they applying if they are just going to turn it down) LTC. I however do not think I am above it and will apply if my dream job does not fall into my lap after a few months of trying.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  4. Visit  RN58186 profile page
    5
    Last week my Mom's goals of care at her LTC facility were changed to comfort measures only. I am so grateful for the nurse who has taken my calls every day, or called me herself to give me a daily update when I cannot be there. For the nurse who called in on her days off just to see how Mom was doing. For the nurse who has looked after her for over 5 years who wasn't afraid to shed some tears with me. For the nurse manager who told me to page her anytime, even if all I need is a hug. For the aides who come every 60-90 minutes when she needs to be turned and don't complain about doing so. For all the staff that realize that I am not trying to be the miserable nurse daughter when I insist that the on call doctor be called for better pain management, but that this is my Mom and making sure she is comfortable is one of the last things I can do for her. LTC nursing takes a special kind of person, and I am glad that that person is working with my Mom this week. I would never consider LTC nurses "less" than hospital nurses, it is different skill set and focus, but still an essential part of the healthcare team. I am very grateful for them and their special skills this week.
    CT Pixie, CMA2013, LTCangel, and 2 others like this.
  5. Visit  greyL profile page
    1
    I don't think this is particularly fair. I certainly don't feel that working in long-term care is beneath me. But getting experience in acute care will open up many more doors for me than long-term care will. Though if I could find a SNF that hired nurses without acute care experience, I'd certainly be all right with that (because again, many SNFs do require acute care experience).
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  6. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN profile page
    2
    I respectively disagree with the OP's sentiment. I don't see ANY part of Nursing as a Specialty being on a hierarchal spectrum. I still have many diversified interests as an ER RN and FNP. I love Trauma, PsychMH, Hospice In and Outpatient, Chemical Dependency, Pediatrics, Cardiology, and Neurology.

    I wouldn't let one misguided disgruntled New Grad persuade me to think they all think different about your specialties value. In fact, I see more saying "I will work "anywhere" possible!"

    Everyone has a valuable place with pointed experience that I couldn't do, if the only position that they could find is with me in ED I wouldn't hold it against them- even if they complained about unhappiness.

    Only you can give someone permission to be offensive with you. Sometimes empathy is divine, I'm not "made" for SNF. It's not "below" me, I lack the skills, ability to thrive, and tolerate the environment. Blessing to those that thrive there
    Last edit by BostonTerrierLoverRN on Dec 7, '12 : Reason: Clarification
    Not_A_Hat_Person and joanna73 like this.
  7. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    4
    I've worked LTC for 2 years, started there as a new grad. What many people don't understand is that you see the same acuity now in LTC as you would in med surg. I've done that also, so I know. I'm soon ready for my next venture, and extremely appreciative of the well rounded experience I now have. As a new grad, I would have accepted ANY job, and made it work. Two years somewhere is not the end of the world, although some new grads would make it so. And guess what? Sitting at home waiting for that "dream job" is silly. Zero experience is going to result in....zero dollars and zero skills. I've always wanted to try travel nursing. When I do move on after 2+ years, there are many more options.
  8. Visit  alotusforyou profile page
    1
    I am a potential nursing student, and I'm a little confused. What is so awesome about working ICU/ER? I imagine that if I become an, ICU or ER would be the last places I'd want to work until I had a little more experience as a nurse. I think I'd much rather start out in LTC or a non-ICU floor in a hospital. Or even doing something like working in a clinic or home health. Then after I felt fully competent in one of those areas, I'd consider ICU.
    nguyency77 likes this.
  9. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN profile page
    3
    Quote from alotusforyou
    I am a potential nursing student, and I'm a little confused. What is so awesome about working ICU/ER? I imagine that if I become an, ICU or ER would be the last places I'd want to work until I had a little more experience as a nurse. I think I'd much rather start out in LTC or a non-ICU floor in a hospital. Or even doing something like working in a clinic or home health. Then after I felt fully competent in one of those areas, I'd consider ICU.
    Please understand I'm not poking fun, just telling if like I see it. In my study group, everyone ended up in a totally different area than they thought they wanted originally. I just knew I would retire from an Adult and Pediatric Cardiology Step Down Unit that hired me during school as a SNA. I worked there 6 months until getting pulled to ED, and have been in ED ever since. Since the hospital was a University Affiliated Hospital, I was able to get my BSN there as well. You never know what you'll love, and it's best to keep an open mind.

    Everyone I remember having an interest in a specific arena, all went into a different area and thrived.

    I mean real diverse, just from my study group:

    Ped Wannabe--> Adult PACU
    ER Wannabe---> PsychMHNP
    CNM Wannabe--> Pediatrics Sports Med.
    CCU Wannabee--> Home Health
    And the girl who graduated number one in my class, who tried to IV successfully 3 timed in school (never a flashback) is now the Head of a PICC team at our University Hospital (she's also still a snotty..., that's another thread

    Keep your mind open. I want this Awesome Profession to blow your hair back! Not burn you out! There is a place if you originally wanted to be a Nurse- you just got to find it.
    Last edit by BostonTerrierLoverRN on Dec 7, '12
    alotusforyou, T-Bird78, and joanna73 like this.
  10. Visit  nguyency77 profile page
    1
    Quote from alotusforyou
    I am a potential nursing student, and I'm a little confused. What is so awesome about working ICU/ER? I imagine that if I become an, ICU or ER would be the last places I'd want to work until I had a little more experience as a nurse. I think I'd much rather start out in LTC or a non-ICU floor in a hospital. Or even doing something like working in a clinic or home health. Then after I felt fully competent in one of those areas, I'd consider ICU.
    I have friends who appear to have fantasies of wheeling patients off to surgery, as they run alongside holding the patient's hand and reassuring them that "Everything is going to be okay!" The ER and ICU are interesting places that require a lot of thinking, but like you I would rather get some experience before I insist on working either of those areas.

    When (and if!) I finish nursing school, and (if) I pass the NCLEX, I would be more than thrilled to go work in the SNF where I was employed at as a CNA. I think I would like doing LTC. Corrections and addictions are other areas I'm interested in because they seem to be unpopular, and therefore where the need is greatest...

    Some new grads turn down jobs because it "isn't their dream job" and because of their huge egos, but I honestly hope and pray for those sorts of people as my job competition when I graduate. Leaves more for the rest of us!
    alotusforyou likes this.
  11. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    1
    My loans are paid after 2.5 years of working, and I have savings. I had a job before I wrote my Board exam, and moved away from home for the job, which I enjoy. Many of my friends who sat around waiting for their "dream job" eventually got desperate and took whatever they could. But they still have huge debt, and one year of experience to my 2+. To each his own, but my point is....their method really wasn't very practical, or forward thinking. Eventually, you can have your dream job. Until that day arrives, the smart ones keep working towards their dream. It doesn't usually happen overnight.
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  12. Visit  rumwynnieRN profile page
    1
    Quote from alotusforyou
    I am a potential nursing student, and I'm a little confused. What is so awesome about working ICU/ER? I imagine that if I become an, ICU or ER would be the last places I'd want to work until I had a little more experience as a nurse. I think I'd much rather start out in LTC or a non-ICU floor in a hospital. Or even doing something like working in a clinic or home health. Then after I felt fully competent in one of those areas, I'd consider ICU.
    When you do your clinicals, this is entirely dependent on how you feel, you tend to do more, you get more skills in, and you find out your nurses may only have 2 patients he/she is responsible for. My family has tried steering me away from doing floor nursing because that's when they can pile on the patients (you should have, say, 4, but then someone calls in, so now you have 8), and school wise, I found my first floor experience to be, well, boring. No one needed anything -- no NG tubes, no IVs, foleys, etc., because they were already done in the ER or ICU. Even in the ICU, a lot of that isn't done because, it's done in the ER.

    To each his own, and in the end, I can only speak for myself and some of my classmates because the above was our experience. Out of school, a lot of people think they'll be that "blood and guts" nurse, they'll know what to do in a code after training, all that (okay the latter is a bit of an exaggeration). Other nurses have echoed the sentiment my family has. They think it's better for me to go to ICU before going to a regular floor because I'll have my skills rather me going to floor where I'll lose them. I prefer to work the floor before going to the ICU because I know where I personally am. Some of my other classmates I can see going to straight to the ICU, and it would be a waste for them to just go to the floor (at least in my opinion).

    In the end, it's what works for you.
    alotusforyou likes this.
  13. Visit  wgc2345678 profile page
    2
    I am starting my nursing program in January, and I have thought a lot about my career goals. I read on another thread that new nurses never dream of working LTC. I guess I am a different breed because that really interests me. My Mom has lived in a skilled nursing facility for 10 years, so I think this has had some influence on me. I will soon have the privelage of taking care of her, as she currently lives in another state. I look forward to this, and it makes me feel like LTC is maybe where I am destined to be. I want to give to a family what so many nurses have given me (comfort, support, care, love). I am humble, however, and I will be happy to get experience where I can get it.
    nguyency77 and joanna73 like this.


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