Accused of being too busy and not "social" enough?? (long) - page 3

by jbp0529 2,191 Views | 26 Comments

I work in a fairly busy ICU, in which it is not uncommon for us to get 3-6 sick admissions/transfers on the night shift alone. So tonight I was confronted by a fellow co-worker (who was charge on the night I am about to... Read More


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    Quote from BSNDec06
    My mom told me when I got my first job at age 15 that "They're paying you to work, not to socialize". This is true and I think that sometimes people forget it. It is important to get along with your co-workers, help them out, and use your strengths to contribute to the team. However, beyond being friendly and cordial, you have no obligation to "shoot the breeze" at work IMO. If you happen to become friends with some of your co-workers it is all the better, but the work and the patients come first. I think that you know that deep down, but nobody likes being given a hard time. Hang in there and good luck
    Couldn't have said it better myself. I work LTAC and it can get tough. We all back each other up as well as back up our CNA's. Anyone not being a "team player" doesn't last long . I worked way too hard for those letters behind my name to not do a good job at work. It's called work because you're supposed to work....wow! I wish I could get paid for socializing...haha.

    Maybe find a way to gently bring up the importance of teamwork at the next staff meeting without being so specific. But just bringing it up puts the "bug" in the director/supervisor's ear that maybe something needs to be monitored a little further.

    Good Luck to you!!
    ~T
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    Quote from tcdtx

    Maybe find a way to gently bring up the importance of teamwork at the next staff meeting without being so specific. But just bringing it up puts the "bug" in the director/supervisor's ear that maybe something needs to be monitored a little further.

    ~T
    i don't know t, maybe i'm too cynical.
    if the concept of teamwork has to be brought up at a meeting, then it's obviously not an inherent value of those attending.
    if a coworker doesn't recognize (or care) that i am drowning, i would rather deal with the coworker myself, rather than a supervisor bringing it up.
    afterall, i am not at work to socialize and be miss popularity.
    if my colleagues don't like being asked to assist, that's too damn bad.
    it reflects their values (or lack thereof) more than it reflects on me.
    i'm a nurse.
    who the hell are they???

    leslie
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    Youre kidding me right??

    Let that roll right off ya!!!!
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    It's been about a day since my post, and I thank you all for your replies and encouragement.

    Just wanted to add a few more points that I didn't mention. One, is the funny part is that for the most part, everyone in my unit is very helpful, and we all jump in with the new admits; why it was different on this particular day, I do not know. Perhaps it was just the particular crew that was on...

    Second, my assignment really was unfair, given the fact that there were several other nurses with only 1 patient that could have easily picked up half of my pair. My mistake was that I didn't complain loudly enough. I've already spoken to my manager about this.

    Third and finally,..all of you are right. I do not feel sorry for being anti-social on this night. Normally I am as happy-go-lucky as the next person, but when it comes down to a choice between chatting and doing my job...my patients will always come first. Anti-social I may have been, but no other nurse, doctor, or family member can ever accuse me of not doing my job; of having rooms that are messy; of not busting my a## providing the best care I can for my patients, in sometimes less-than-perfect situations.
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    I think it's great you spoke with your manager and also that you feel you could have been more assertive in getting your needs across. Hopefully, things will be different next time.

    I understand how you feel. I'm new and when I first started, I was accused of being "anti-social" on my unit a few times. I think more experienced nurses forget that new nurses are still trying to feel competent, get things done, understand things, etc. and that leaves no time for "extracurricular activities." I have to say though, even when I do have down time (not much on a tele floor0, I try to do something like my committee work, restock supply carts, clean around the nurse's station, review rhythm strips for practice, etc. just to keep myself busy.

    Keep up the good work...you should be proud of yourself!
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    Needless to say, between this guy and my GIB patient, I was running around like a chicken with it's head cut off !! LOL The rest of the staff enjoyed a relatively calm night of playing on the internet, flirting with each other, and talking on the phone. No one would step in to help me unless I specifically called out, and then they would only do the bare minimum, and give me disgusted looks for interrupting happy time. Finally, I reconciled that I'll just eat it alone and do the best I could.

    This happens where I work too. Then they SIT around saying "oh, I help anyone who asks"....yea right! Only if it's their buddy! I could go on a vent right here myself but I won't.....LOL
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    Geez.... this week I got accused of being "too social" with the patients and families... all because I DARED to ask a patient if they wanted their bed changed, and I gave my preceptor's one patient a bath because she was busy doing vitals. My baths were pretty much done except one was sleeping, and the other one could do themself, but wasn't doing it fast enough to suit the one nurse on the floor. All this resulted in my preceptor hauling my butt into a room and saying I had to "move faster". Then she said that the nurses all like me, and the patients "adore" me. I told my preceptor I can move faster, but I can't change who I am, and if I spoil my patients because I asked if they wanted their bed changed, then so be it.... Things settled down the next day.... but still.... :angryfire


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