A New Twist on a Familiar Complaint: Toxic EMPLOYEES - page 4

We've all complained about toxic workplaces and toxic managers. Now that I've been a manager myself for a while, I realize there is a type of healthcare worker whom I never even knew existed when I... Read More

  1. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
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    Quote from mjlrn97
    That's just it, Steph.........only in our situation, it's the low-wage (and often low-wattage) employees who have us over a barrel, and they know it. How many smart, talented, educated people are willing to do hard menial labor for 8 bucks an hour, day in and day out, for years on end? Yes, there are some very conscientious workers at this level, and I praise God every day that I have more of them than the other kind. But all too often, you get what you pay for, and I cringe inside when I'm interviewing potential staff members because the BEST I can offer them is $9.15 an hour to start, even they've got years of experience. We're asking them to care for frail human beings, yet we pay them no more than a burger-flipper at McDumpster.

    But that's a matter for a whole 'nother thread.

    Well, that is certainly part of it.

    Money. Lack of ability to replace that toxic employee if you fire them.

    I sometimes hate being in management . .. although it is only part-time when I'm the supervisor and ER nurse . . which is a combined role at my hospital. So, when you are busy in the ER and the floor has a staffing problem, the buck stops with me.

    steph
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  3. Visit  nursemike profile page
    0
    Quote from TazziRN
    I take the other view. Yes, it can be hard to can a union employee, but it makes it hard to unfairly can one too. I was involved in an incident years ago and was falsely accused of something, and I later found out that HR was so sure I was guilty that they had termination papers made out in my file, ready for signatures. Someone forgot to remove them.
    For sure, there are two sides to that coin. Then, too, even non-union employees have some recourse for wrongful terminations, although it sounds like a pretty big ordeal. It's bound to be easier to go to a union rep than to hire a lawyer and go to the labor board. On the whole, my facility seems to have a pretty benevolent attitude toward its employees, but I certainly couldn't swear there was never one employee who ran afoul of one supervisor for less than valid reasons. I have heard of instances where someone was rightfully terminated and gone to their union rep, only to be told there was nothing they could do about it, since it was a legitimate dismissal.
    One lesson I learned long ago, in a previous job, is that no matter how well you get along with your present boss, that's no guarantee you'll get along as well with the one who takes their place, someday. So, yeah, unions have their place.
    I think squeakynurse had the best idea of all.
  4. Visit  gr8rnpjt profile page
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    Quote from cota2k
    Always a joy to watch, and or listen to, someone lean against the water cooler for half an hour, and describe how lazy, or unattentive a particular nurse is. Granted, the other nurse may well be "toxic", but what about the instigator? In all my jobs, dominated by male or female, I've yet to find a group larger than 3-4 that can not find fault in the others. My MO is to punch in, work, go home in one piece. And I'm sure there is someone I work with that doesn't like that either.
    I am with you cota2k, I try to keep out of the mix. And it is like this everywhere, no matter you work in a hospital or an office setting. But I like to do my thing, keep to myself, do my work to my best ability and go home!
  5. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
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    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    I am with you cota2k, I try to keep out of the mix. And it is like this everywhere, no matter you work in a hospital or an office setting. But I like to do my thing, keep to myself, do my work to my best ability and go home!
    Me too . . .one of the joys of working part-time too.

    steph
  6. Visit  nursemike profile page
    0
    Quote from mjlrn97
    That's just it, Steph.........only in our situation, it's the low-wage (and often low-wattage) employees who have us over a barrel, and they know it. How many smart, talented, educated people are willing to do hard menial labor for 8 bucks an hour, day in and day out, for years on end? Yes, there are some very conscientious workers at this level, and I praise God every day that I have more of them than the other kind. But all too often, you get what you pay for, and I cringe inside when I'm interviewing potential staff members because the BEST I can offer them is $9.15 an hour to start, even they've got years of experience. We're asking them to care for frail human beings, yet we pay them no more than a burger-flipper at McDumpster.

    But that's a matter for a whole 'nother thread.
    One of the things they've done at my facility is to start classes so a few of our ancillary/support staff can train to become nurse's aides. So you can get a job as a housekeeper or dietary assistant with just a high school diploma, but eventually advance to one of our better paying non-licensed jobs. This hasn't worked miracles, exactly, but I think some employees do feel more motivated if they can see a way to advance themselves.
    Some of our best aides have no desire to do anything else, but some of our best are nursing students. Again, I think a lot of people can stay more motivated in a low-paying, thankless job if they can see it as a stepping stone toward a better-paying, thankless job. Not that it's a cure-all, either. The problem, I suppose, is that those who don't care about the job they have aren't likely to care much about advancing, either. I do think OJT and tuition assistance can do a lot to keep conscientious, motivated employees from getting burnt out, though.
  7. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
    0
    Quote from nursemike
    One of the things they've done at my facility is to start classes so a few of our ancillary/support staff can train to become nurse's aides. So you can get a job as a housekeeper or dietary assistant with just a high school diploma, but eventually advance to one of our better paying non-licensed jobs. This hasn't worked miracles, exactly, but I think some employees do feel more motivated if they can see a way to advance themselves.
    Some of our best aides have no desire to do anything else, but some of our best are nursing students. Again, I think a lot of people can stay more motivated in a low-paying, thankless job if they can see it as a stepping stone toward a better-paying, thankless job. Not that it's a cure-all, either. The problem, I suppose, is that those who don't care about the job they have aren't likely to care much about advancing, either. I do think OJT and tuition assistance can do a lot to keep conscientious, motivated employees from getting burnt out, though.
    We have a CNA class and LVN class at our hospital.

    We also have teleconferencing for the RN program at Shasta College.

    However, you have to pay enough money to keep people from going to the big city for higher hourly pay.

    We've lost a few LVN's and RN's that we actually helped through school to the big city.

    steph
  8. Visit  Omomo-Don profile page
    0
    let not your heart be troubled.
  9. Visit  imenid37 profile page
    0
    Does anyone else believe that keeping these toxic types around causes way more problems than it solves in the long run? Yes, if Mr/Ms. Toxic is fired, then a replacement will need to be found to replace that individual. Keeping Mr/Ms. Toxic on staff often helps to drive many others off the unit, especially new grads or more passive types of people. Then many people will need to be replaced. I know this needs to come from the top, but I think we need to start considering the toll these people take on the rest of the staff. I can think of one particular med-surg nurse I knew who was just foul. She ate new nurses, float nurses, and agency for lunch over and over again. Yet, she was in charge all of the time and really wasn't even terribly skilled clinically. She ran to managemnt all of the time, ranting about other people when she was usually the problem!!!
  10. Visit  Angie O'Plasty, RN profile page
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    Quote from imenid37
    Does anyone else believe that keeping these toxic types around causes way more problems than it solves in the long run? Yes, if Mr/Ms. Toxic is fired, then a replacement will need to be found to replace that individual. Keeping Mr/Ms. Toxic on staff often helps to drive many others off the unit, especially new grads or more passive types of people. Then many people will need to be replaced.
    Yes!! Yes!! Yes!! I've seen it and I've been one who left. Too much of a toll on me to try to keep making nice with these types. I just want to go in, do my job, and go home.


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