How much schooling does it take to become a Neonatal Nurse?? - page 2

I'm researching Neonatal nursing for a project, to see what I'm going to be getting into in the future. I found the amount of schooling needed to be a Doctor in the NICU...but not a nurse.. Any help... Read More

  1. by   Jerico
    They are only putting BSN nurses certain NICUs. Ours is a regional Level III, II, and I with flight nurses. We get 6 months of classroom combined with on the floor training to be in the NICU. Magnet status hospital. It is awesome.
  2. by   danissa
    Quote from Gompers
    In the United States...

    You need to either go to a community college and get an Associate's degree in Nursing, or to a university and get a Bachelor's degree in Nursing. Then you take your state boards to get your RN. After that, you are able to work in a NICU - they will train you in neonatal care because you don't learn that in school. It's your choice whether you get the 2-year Associate's degree or the 4-year Bachelor's, as both are accepted in the NICU.

    For the most part, you cannot get your LPN (licensed practical nurse) and work in a NICU. Some LPNs still work in NICUs, but the vast majority of units will not hire new ones. It is an ICU, and they cannot perform all of the tasks necessary to independently care for the sicker babies.
    In Scotland certainly, if you have gone to university and gained diploma or degree in midwifery, then got a post in a nicu, you can go back to uni and take further NICU course, covering theory and practical training. Learn to do iv's, blood gases etc. we dont site cannulas, med staff still do this, although we will have shortly two ANNP's who will do this.
  3. by   ladydame
    I just graduated from a BSN program and start in the NICU as an RN tomorrow. I will have a more lengthy orientation to my unit than most other floors/units, but I feel it's worth it. Good luck to you!
  4. by   leann1993
    I am also interested in Neonatal Nursing and by reading this everybody has also helped me learn more about it. :rcgtku:
  5. by   albelo1222
    hi i'm in the same process if u find anything can you please message me back wtih the information?
  6. by   kbm318
    Quote from albelo1222
    hi i'm in the same process if u find anything can you please message me back wtih the information?
    http://www.bing.com/search?q=neonata...ng&form=OSDSRC
  7. by   ShanonFoster
    Quote from Gompers
    In the United States...

    You need to either go to a community college and get an Associate's degree in Nursing, or to a university and get a Bachelor's degree in Nursing. Then you take your state boards to get your RN. After that, you are able to work in a NICU - they will train you in neonatal care because you don't learn that in school. It's your choice whether you get the 2-year Associate's degree or the 4-year Bachelor's, as both are accepted in the NICU.

    For the most part, you cannot get your LPN (licensed practical nurse) and work in a NICU. Some LPNs still work in NICUs, but the vast majority of units will not hire new ones. It is an ICU, and they cannot perform all of the tasks necessary to independently care for the sicker babies.
    What schools would you recommend for a resident in Florida....
  8. by   darynash
    Where in Florida do you live? I went to Edison College in Fort Myers for my Associate's Degree and they have a great program. Florida Gulf Coast University in Fort Myers is also a good program. If I lived near Tampa or Gainesville, I would recommend University of South Florida in Tampa or University of Florida in Gainesville.

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