NEW GRAD ICU RN - page 2

FOR EXPERIENCED ICU NURSES; HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT A NEW GRAD COMING IN TO AN ICU NEW GRAD PROGRAM? PLEASE SHARE YOUR OPINIONS AND EXPERIENCES. THANK YOU.... Read More

  1. by   zambezi
    Hello...We have an excellent program at the school that i graduated from...as a student, i was in an emersion program...i worked in the ccu with a preceptor for six months as a student, in conjuction with all of my other classes...for the first three months, i worked 20-40 hours a week and for the last three months i "worked" full time on my preceptors schedule....this was great because i got a chance to meet the staff, learn what goes on in the ccu, and get familiar with swans, art lines, vents etc in a learning environment. I also took BLS/ACLS as a student. When i graduated, i took a three day critical care class, did a month on days, two months on nights before i was "on my own". Everyone that works is my buddy....i ask all kinds of questions but am feeling more comfortable. the learning curve is steep and each day i learn something new each time i work. i am about six months out of my orientation at this point...
  2. by   zambezi
    Hello...We have an excellent program at the school that i graduated from...as a student, i was in an emersion program...i worked in the ccu with a preceptor for six months as a student, in conjuction with all of my other classes...for the first three months, i worked 20-40 hours a week and for the last three months i "worked" full time on my preceptors schedule....this was great because i got a chance to meet the staff, learn what goes on in the ccu, and get familiar with swans, art lines, vents etc in a learning environment. I also took BLS/ACLS as a student. When i graduated, i took a three day critical care class, did a month on days, two months on nights before i was "on my own". Everyone that works is my buddy....i ask all kinds of questions but am feeling more comfortable. the learning curve is steep and each day i learn something new each time i work. i am about six months out of my orientation at this point...
  3. by   mattsmom81
    I see this is an old/revitalized thread. Just want to add that not all hospitals are set up to be able to accept a new grad into ICU and do a decent job of teaching them, and this is something for new grads to keep in mind.

    I'd suggest a new grad go into this venture only where a reputable critical care course is offered..using both classroom and OJT and a period internship following... several months at least.
  4. by   Chaoticdreams33
    Hospitals around here Hartford CT/Springfield MA most have 6 month new grad ICU orientations including classroom and on the floor training.
  5. by   Vich
    Quote from Janet Barclay
    Hi jumpmanrn,
    If you'd asked me that question 5 years ago I might have had a different answer, BUT...
    We have hired many new grads into the ICU where I work, espescially in the past few years as the shortage has become more acute. Most of them fly. The qualiteies that a new grad needs in the icu are:1 good critical thinking skills and common sense.2 a willingness to learn. 3 good basic understanding of A&P.
    I am coming around to thinking that is actually harder for experienced nurses to come into critical care. It is really hard to go from being an experienced "supernurse" to being a beginner.
    Hope this helps.
    Janet
    I liked your response
  6. by   lyallch
    I am a first year grad nurse, doing a rotation in the OR. These include being in the Recovery room, anaesthetic nursing, scouting/circulating and scrubbing/instrument nursing. Although I am thinking seriously about going into ICU next year in July when the ICU opens in the hospital where I work, I feel that this rotation had helped me in terms of airway management, anaesthetics, infection control, etc. which will still come in invaluable in the ICU. My half year rotation in the surgical ward also helped me to be confident with IV skills etc. So, every bit of clinical skills help, I reckon.

    It is great to read that seasoned ICU nurses are keen to embrace the newbies.
  7. by   picu36
    Just wondering your experience level before you started working in the ICU?? It really does not matter whether it is a new graduate or experience nurse, it's about the individuals willingness to learn. I believe nurses in speciality areas tend to forget they also had to start somewhere in the learning process. I currently work PICU and they hire both new grads and experience nurses which seems to work out okay.
    Last edit by picu36 on Nov 5, '06
  8. by   MKZ
    I am in my fourth month as an new grad in an ICU and I am miserable a lot of the time on my unit. Not because it's the ICU, its because this particular hospital did not live up to my expectations. Choose a GOOD program. I love nursing, learning, helping....but this new grad program I just experienced (six weeks) was horrible. I had one day classroom and the rest on the floor with diffrent preceptors who were overwhelmed and overworked. There was absolutely no time to teach. Baptized by fire. And unfortunately, after all this time, I realize I owe it to myself and the people I want to help that it is not safe. But I move fast (to make up for how long things can take for me, it's no fun. In order to be safe I ask questions, and the people on my unit aren't prepared to help, I get frowns too often... They are super busy themselves.
  9. by   Christie RN2006
    Quote from 502Nurse
    I am a student who is also interested in SICU. I wondered
    if there was a standard length of time for a preceptorship
    for a new grad who wants to work in the ICU. Could anyone
    let me know what the training time is in their facility?
    Thanks!
    In the SICU I work in, the orientation period is anywhere from 3-4 months. On a rare occasion they will shorten it if you are doing great.
  10. by   David's Harp
    I'm sorry that this has been your experience. I am still on the "student" side of the wall until May, and am beginning to send out applications without a ton of knowledge of how the different area hospitals stack up. I've been looking on this site and trying to search for blogs, but it's a matter of "who's gonna go public and expose their place of employment?!", the obvious answer being, "No one!"

    Can anyone offer advice on _how_ a soon-to-be-grad goes about choosing a "GOOD program"?

    Quote from MKZ
    I am in my fourth month as an new grad in an ICU and I am miserable a lot of the time on my unit. Not because it's the ICU, its because this particular hospital did not live up to my expectations. Choose a GOOD program. I love nursing, learning, helping....but this new grad program I just experienced (six weeks) was horrible. I had one day classroom and the rest on the floor with diffrent preceptors who were overwhelmed and overworked. There was absolutely no time to teach. Baptized by fire. And unfortunately, after all this time, I realize I owe it to myself and the people I want to help that it is not safe. But I move fast (to make up for how long things can take for me, it's no fun. In order to be safe I ask questions, and the people on my unit aren't prepared to help, I get frowns too often... They are super busy themselves.
  11. by   augigi
    Find out what their ratios are, what sort of orientation program they have for new ICU staff/new grads, how long you'll have a preceptor, when you'll be on your own etc. Get in WRITING how long your orientation will be, if it's short get in writing that it can be extended if you are not safe after that period. Speak with the nurse managers if possible to get an idea of the unit culture - do they have a lot of new staff, or experienced staff to support you as a new RN? Are they happy to teach? etc
  12. by   wonderbee
    If you are excited and motivated to take care of very sick people and the environment is supportive, you've got lots of physical energy, go for it! I suggest you shadow at least one shift first in your unit of choice before committing to experience the various levels of ill patients. I started in ICU with several other new grads. I believe there were 7 of us who started at the same time. We are all about one year out now. Out of the 7, 5 remain. Of those 5, two have mixed or ambivalent feelings and consider the job to be simply too much at times. Of the remaining 3 who are absolute success stories, one is an absolute natural and picked up like a sponge and made herself part of the unit like she had always been there. She is all of 21 yoa. The other two are coming along well. We all had 6 weeks of clinical orientation and 4 weeks of classroom. BTW, I am one of the two who has left the ICU. It was my choice. The other one was fired for working while impaired.
  13. by   1017RN
    Pls help, I just passed the NCLEX and need to apply for new grad program, but most of the hospitals will start the program on january next year. help!

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