do any of you like codes?? - page 5

i have a confession...i like codes, ok, i love codes. i don't like that i like them, because, i know it means a human being is in big trouble. but my heart gets pumping, pin point pupils,... Read More

  1. by   meandragonbrett
    I prefer to spend my shift with an extremely sick one on drips and try to stay ahead of a code happening. Just my preference....not to say that I don't enjoy participating in a code though.
  2. by   pawashrn
    In place of getting your adreneline pumped over a code. Why don't you take up sky diving. This way the only person that may suffer is you. A good nurse prevents a code, by recognizing the signs and symptoms. When the unit is quiet it means everyone has done a good job keeping the patients stable.Next time you are in a code and you are pumping on someone's chest do what I do, in your head say the Lord's Prayer. I am not a religious fanatic, just respectful of the infirmed.
  3. by   gradcare
    pa, I don't think anyone is being disrespectful of the individual who has coded. The common theme is that for those who feel challenged in a positive manner by being in a code that it is sad that someone else is in trouble. While we all strive to prevent codes they will continue to happen regardless of how good you and your team are. Why ? Simple people with irritable hearts will code, people with uncontrolled blood and fluid loss will code. people with massive electolyte shifts will code, simply becase they are so sick and these changes can occur more rapidly than even the best team can accomodate. Personally when in a code i'm beating my brains to think of probable causes and the treatment.... and wondering what the patient really wants.
  4. by   K98
    At first I thought it was kind of exciting. After a couple of years, it's become sort of routine. One of our new orientees told me that she hoped that someone would code so that she could see what it was like. I explained to her that it was our job to make sure that our patients didn't code. Alas, she got her wish within her first 4 hours.
  5. by   pawashrn
    sometimes the best code of all. Is no code at all
  6. by   SteveNNP
    Or... the best code is the one that doesn't inevitably happen right before shift change.
  7. by   mcknis
    I think I already posted on this, but i do like the adrenaline rush during codes. I somehow do my best under pressure, and can still keep it all together.
  8. by   JaredCNA
    I can understand and somewhat agree, without hoping to sound sick, with the OP.

    Of course, as a CNA, my role in a code is usually chest compressions...but it is an 'amazing' feeling to know that you could possibly bring a person back to life. I'll never forget my first code. The coolest (for lack of a better term) feeling was when the lab tech was drawing blood and could only fill the syringe if I was doing active compressions. So it was then I realized that I was the one pumping the blood through the pt's body...even though I knew that was the purpose of compressions, it still felt wonderful to see it.


    Quote from TheCommuter
    I absolutely detest codes. It's probably due to the fact that I work in a nursing home, where codes are rarely successful when performed on elderly hearts that are already diseased and/or enlarged.
    I get where you are coming from. I work in a hospital, but the last time I saw a code blue was about a month ago. I just got done changing the pt and I go back in 15 minutes later to take his 0400 v/s. Well, he was in full cardiac arrest when I entered the room. As the first responder, I pulled the code switch, bagged the pt, and started compressions. Poor guy was 86 years old. :-(
  9. by   moose210
    I would I have to say I think I am leaning toward liking codes. At any rate codes like me. I refer to myself as the black cloud (jokingly of course). I have not made it through a year of nursing yet and have been in my fair share of codes. It was happening so often around me the lab guy thought I was on the code team. I have also started a new ritual (esp. when pulled to another floor) I look at all the charts and write down all the DNR on all the patient's on the floor not just my patients, charge nurse or not.

    I had been a part of codes before but the first two times I had to start the process:
    My charge nurse left the floor without telling me to smoke, I only had an LPN from another floor with me and a CNA. Standing in the med room beside the LPN pulling out unending meds I hear RN to room whatever and I had had the pt. the night before and thank goodness I knew he was a full code because she didn't appear to remember and took off to his room. Called the code and luckily the team was there within a blink of an eye. The guy did die, and it was disturbing because he had just been eating a popsicle and was okay, but the sad part was he had no family to call.

    The second most traumatizing code happened when I was pulled to work on another floor (it had not been 6 months and I was not supposed to be pulled for six months). I asked my charge nurse before I left the floor if there were other RN's up there or I was going to refuse to go. They called and assured me there were, and of course, that was no lie. There were two other RN's, however, the one in charge had been out of orientation one month longer than I had and the other one had been out three weeks. Neither of course with no code experience. I informed them of my black cloud that had seemed to be following me for about over a month and made it clear I wanted to know all their DNR's they complied thank God. On into the shift the three weeker was telling me about her pt. she thought he had had a change in mental status. I immediately made her go with me to assess him. He had a venti mask on already well it was pulled to the side and he stats were 70 before I replaced and tried to talk him into breathing better. It was apparent he was not with it and confirmed this was a change with her. I told her to go ahead call respiratory, the Dr. and to get someone to go ahead and put a bed alarm on him. Breathing better at this point. I stepped out the door to help her do these deeds. Respiratory came to his room and was standing at the door and said he was in the floor. The three weeker screamed for me, frazzled of course I went running to find the man on the floor, bleeding he had gotten up fell and hit his head I turned him over started compressions, while she was asking what to do I told her to get down there and help me. First broken ribs that is always a nice experience. (kinda makes you want to throw up) made her keep doing compressions while I jumped up and just put the venti mask on him that was all I had time for and the code team got there pretty fast and we actually got him back by the time they were there. To make this long story short, he died three days later anyways, but we did get a yellow card ( a show of appreciation at my hospital) from the doctor.

    Oh yeah that nurse from my regular floor heard the code and came to help me because she knew it was me and well of course she owed it to me after she abandoned me to go smoke.

    I thought you might appreciate that since you like codes.
  10. by   EMTastic
    I have a love/hate relationship with codes right now! I think the "hate" only due to the fact I am really new to EMS, but codes are a big reason I chose a career in the ER. For example, the other day we had a ped and a neonate code at the same time and it was my first time dealing with a code of someone under the age of fifty. Our ER is small so I tech and order labs and do secretary work. Fortunately another person was on staff to do secretary work. Plus we were full so I had to assist with all the other patients too. It was just chaos , running around, listening the nurses with the codes shout things for me to get them and not being familiar where things were! But the outcomes were successful and that more than makes up for everything! I know it will be easier later when I get used to the chaos
  11. by   JaredCNA
    Okay, so this is weird. The patient I had that coded that I talk about earlier, totally fine one minute, dead the next...well, when I would ask him before if he needed me to get him anything, it would always be something. we did this about 30 times that night. the last time, I asked, "Do you need anything else while I'm still here?" And kinda peacefully, he said, nothing at all.

    It had to have been right after I walked out that he went into cardiac arrest because I go in there less than 15 minutes later and he's blue.

    Some people in the medical field will tell that a patient knows when they are going to die.
  12. by   mcknis
    i do believe that some people just know when it is their time to go. not everyone has that instinct, but some do. I have seen some older folks pass away like they were just meant to do so, then there have been others that have been so scared, that they held onto everything in the world. When it is my time to go, just let me go. I better be a DNR and I will push and push for that to be. I feel soo sorry for these pts whose family members want grandma around for just a few more hours so THEY can be with them, but they don't understand how much grandma/grandpa just want to be let go.
  13. by   JaredCNA
    Quote from mcknis
    i do believe that some people just know when it is their time to go. not everyone has that instinct, but some do. I have seen some older folks pass away like they were just meant to do so, then there have been others that have been so scared, that they held onto everything in the world. When it is my time to go, just let me go. I better be a DNR and I will push and push for that to be. I feel soo sorry for these pts whose family members want grandma around for just a few more hours so THEY can be with them, but they don't understand how much grandma/grandpa just want to be let go.
    You're right, I think. We had a hospice patient on our med/surg unit for about a month. Bedfast, didn't talk, but you could tell how bad he was hurting...They D/C'd his PEG tube because it came out and didn't put it back in. He was ready to go...so one night I came in to make rounds and said, "Mr. X, dont be afraid. Why fight it."

    Then they'll usually pass in a day or two from my experiences. I'm not sure if telling a pt it is going to be okay actually helps but I try to do it whenever we get respite care patients.

    I think with my guy who coded 10 minutes after I saw him, he was just ready. He was a very needy guy. Every time you came in the room he'd need something...and i'm become used to it. That last time I left his room, he said "nothing at all."

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