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Joined Jul 11, '05. Posts: 3,261 (64% Liked) Likes: 8,633

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  • Apr 27

    Quote from Farawyn
    This reminds me of the Flounce Bingo game from a couple of years back.

    Link:

    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...ml#post8726774
    This gives me an idea to make my own BINGO card for work...

    Anyone ever see the Walmart Bingo, or COPS Bingo? Makes watching COPS with my dad worthwhile. Or going to Walmart.

  • Apr 27

    We just an an unexpected fire alarm and it was a thunder storm outside.

    I feel like half the school followed me to my office for:

    New Shirts (NOPE, it's water you will live)
    New Socks (We don't have anymore, but even if we did)
    and my favorite
    "Feeling cold"


    Meanwhile the little one who hot and was throwing up right before this chaos started, now reports to feel better "because of the rain"...


    C'MON NOW

  • Apr 26

    The first school I worked at (for 4 years) had the end of two cots towards my desk and YES it was unnerving when the kids would just sit and stare at me. Whether they were waiting their 10 minutes post crackers for nausea or waiting to be picked up.

    I put a word match game to play so that would keep them occupied mostly. I had the obscure medical terms on one side of a double cabinet and the laymen's term on the other side. Kids could guess which ones went together. ie: epitaxis (nosebleed), idiopathic (no known cause), caries (cavities), and the most popular was always sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia (ice cream headache)

  • Apr 26

    Quote from kidzcare
    The first school I worked at (for 4 years) had the end of two cots towards my desk and YES it was unnerving when the kids would just sit and stare at me. Whether they were waiting their 10 minutes post crackers for nausea or waiting to be picked up.

    I put a word match game to play so that would keep them occupied mostly. I had the obscure medical terms on one side of a double cabinet and the laymen's term on the other side. Kids could guess which ones went together. ie: epitaxis (nosebleed), idiopathic (no known cause), caries (cavities), and the most popular was always sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia (ice cream headache)
    And.
    Now I've learned something.

  • Apr 26

    Pink and black. Not only fetch, but very 80s.
    Jealous?

  • Apr 26

    My son came home asking for a fidget popper. I told him absolutely not. If he needed something to do that badly I could find him some extra chores. That got him moving. He is not dx ADD/ADHD. I think they would be great for those diagnosed to use. For others, just a distraction.

    Have we gotten to the "But your 504 is better than mine, so I'm gonna call that discrimination!" mentality yet?

  • Apr 25

    After 20ish years of doing vision screenings--I have been doing A LOT of thinking about this specific topic-- When kids pass a vision screen, but there seems to be a problem. I would HIGHLY recommend they child get a Eye exam. I have attached a handout that I got from one of my local Optometrists. It is worth at least 1,000 words.

    Also, if you aren't familiar with Vision Therapy. I highly recommend you do some googling and read up on it.

    One thing that I am proposing, is that when the paperwork is in process for an IEP and I am asked for vision screening results-- If a student has passed my screenings, and there is still concerns that may lead to an IEP...I strongly feel that the paperwork shouldn't proceed without a Vision Exam. The reason I feel this way, is that, school vision screening in general. Is just what is says "a screening". Yes, it is a great tool to catch the big things on a lot of kids relatively quickly. But, if a student still isn't achieving to their potential...I want to make absolutely sure that it is not related to an undiagnosed vision disorder.

    Any thoughts from your experience??

  • Apr 25

    If they follow the directions on the initial shampooing and in 10 days do the 2nd shampoo they don't have to nit-pick. The empty egg sacs will eventually deteriorate from washing the hair. UNLESS they get re-exposed during this period or the lice are resistant to OTC treatment (which I don't think is as prevalent as reported).

    Review some of my posts for more detailed information about head lice life cycle.

    And yes, I have posed this question by email directly to Dr. Richard Pollack, the lice guru, and he reported to me, if your follow the correct treatment scheme, nit picking is not required to eliminate head lice.

    Phobias, hysteria, emotional panic, and outright mis-information drive the cost of lice treatment up.

  • Apr 24

    2328527271_5e2fd3f25e2432-jpghttps://cdn.diabetesdaily.com/wp-con...d3f25e2432.jpg
    No reusing lancets or needles! I love this picture, I've shown it to lots of patients and a few students/parents.

  • Apr 24

    My second grader uses the same lancet all week, tries twenty times to get blood and once she bleeds she flings blood everywhere, then wipes her finger on her shirt. Every suggestion to change lancet, change finger to less calloused or to use tissue is totally ignored. I heard she didn't re-enroll for next year, is it wrong for me to be doing my Snoopy happy dance?

  • Apr 24

    My first visit of the day was for a sunburned nose..he wanted something to cover it up because it looked embarassing. Yes, because the bandage across your nose & under your glasses does NOT look embarassing.

  • Apr 24

    Quote from bluebonnetrn
    I am upset that my BSN and 15 years of experience still gets me micromanaged by lay people.
    Yes!! This is what is infuriating! It is a reality for every professional that works with the public in some capacity.

    I try to explain this to SM and he does not understand. He works in IT and when he is fixing an issue, he can tell the people waiting on him "Sit back and let me do my job so then you will be able to do your job." And when they ask him "Well, what's wrong with it??" he asks "Do you really want to know what the problem is? Because I can tell you- in detail. Or do you want to know that I can fix it and that I can fix it faster without explaining it?"

    I'd love to say something like that to some of my coworkers and parents ie: "Do you want a full explanation or do you want to trust my assessment skills enough to accept that this child is well enough to be in class?"

  • Apr 24

    Kids don't know the difference between being uncomfortable and being in pain.

  • Apr 24

    Quote from Spidey's mom
    Lice don't jump!

    Poor little thing probably died holding onto the hair, let go, and fell.
    He was pushed!!!

  • Apr 24

    Great Job.

    But it just like with any new urgent situation that involves adults in multiple disciplines and multiple children, Chaos Is highly possible. I'm an RN and a police officer who has worked as an SRO for years so I see your senecio from a unique position .
    First establishing your role as the "primary " in this and similar medical emergencies is vital. "Even if feeling get touched". Patient comes first. Now trust me my police side does tend to take led but medical emergencies need health care first .

    Second, all of these other disciplines should instinctively go to their training. (I.E.; teachers and assistants should be assisting in removing children to area away from scene to avoid the panic they experience with fear. Security should be preparing to receive EMS. Admin should be on phone with EMS. Coordinating their arrival and relaying the nurses assessment to medic dispatch in order to insure the proper unit is dispatched. Social workers and counselor need to be with remaining removed students providing care and also with the coordination with admin. , calling parents of the patient child (don't want everyone providing parents with different versions or update intel.)

    Third, radio transmissions need to be limited to Nurse - Admin. Tell everyone to "shut up" . In a nicer but firm way. You can apologize later. Patient comes first. Radio clearance is so vital in an emergency Even police habitually talk over one another and need leadership to advise them to "clear the air unless you have an emergency '
    yes put together a plan but this needs regular drills like a fire drill.

    Great job with deciding to create a action plan for this and similar situations. You are a credit to the profession.
    let me know if you need further assistance, if this response helps!

    Sergeant Nurse


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