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Joined Jul 11, '05. Posts: 2,754 (60% Liked) Likes: 6,415

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  • 7:54 am

    You've got to do what's right for you - but i'm not sure that i'd quit one job before the other is nailed down.

  • Jul 21

    I think Nurse ABC summed it up best! Well except for the billing in my case! I don't do billing!!

  • Jul 20

    Sorry - the forum is not very lively this time of year - i only peeked in the other day and didn't have time to make a long post.
    I ended up going from a very small school to a school 8 times its size with a completely different school population. My best piece of advice it to breathe - and don't let the kids overwhelm you. We have become a society where everyone wants everything NOW. Well, that's fine - well not fine - that's actually a whole 'nuther diatribe. But these kids have to remember that you are one person serving 900 kids.
    Prioritize the visits just as you would triage anything else coming into your office. Since these are older kids, they can probably do a lot of the smaller things like bandaids, getting ice packs, and rinsing dust out of their eyes themselves. The most you'd need to do is log their name, complaint and times. And some people establish in the older grades a sign in sheet. Personally, I think it's dicey. Yes, you can do it where you just have the kids write their names, but i'd never remember why who was there for what, and if you have them write reason for visit, then it can be a violation of privacy. Not everyone needs to know that Amanda Cardalucci needed a tampon.
    As far as the things that need your assessment- the headaches, stomachaches and general malingerers - let the kids learn how to wait a chicken licken moment. I find that's usually when i get most annoyed and over whelmed is when i am in the middle of something and i get 5 or 6 kids coming in at a time (usually right after lunch and BEFORE they have to resume class) and I often wonder to myself if these kids will use ALL their sick time by the end of January when they get into the real world.
    Again, breathe. Take it one student at a time. I usually ask the all what they need, weed out the quick ones or tend to and emergencies first.
    Larger school (and older grades) also sometimes come with fun (ha ha) extras like interscholascolastic sports and managing those physicals. That can be a pain in the rump, BUT if there is an athletic director, use him or her as a resource to help you get that job done. Remember- they need your input. No physical, no play. I use my AD to run physical to the school MD, very handy!

  • Jul 17

    Sorry - the forum is not very lively this time of year - i only peeked in the other day and didn't have time to make a long post.
    I ended up going from a very small school to a school 8 times its size with a completely different school population. My best piece of advice it to breathe - and don't let the kids overwhelm you. We have become a society where everyone wants everything NOW. Well, that's fine - well not fine - that's actually a whole 'nuther diatribe. But these kids have to remember that you are one person serving 900 kids.
    Prioritize the visits just as you would triage anything else coming into your office. Since these are older kids, they can probably do a lot of the smaller things like bandaids, getting ice packs, and rinsing dust out of their eyes themselves. The most you'd need to do is log their name, complaint and times. And some people establish in the older grades a sign in sheet. Personally, I think it's dicey. Yes, you can do it where you just have the kids write their names, but i'd never remember why who was there for what, and if you have them write reason for visit, then it can be a violation of privacy. Not everyone needs to know that Amanda Cardalucci needed a tampon.
    As far as the things that need your assessment- the headaches, stomachaches and general malingerers - let the kids learn how to wait a chicken licken moment. I find that's usually when i get most annoyed and over whelmed is when i am in the middle of something and i get 5 or 6 kids coming in at a time (usually right after lunch and BEFORE they have to resume class) and I often wonder to myself if these kids will use ALL their sick time by the end of January when they get into the real world.
    Again, breathe. Take it one student at a time. I usually ask the all what they need, weed out the quick ones or tend to and emergencies first.
    Larger school (and older grades) also sometimes come with fun (ha ha) extras like interscholascolastic sports and managing those physicals. That can be a pain in the rump, BUT if there is an athletic director, use him or her as a resource to help you get that job done. Remember- they need your input. No physical, no play. I use my AD to run physical to the school MD, very handy!

  • Jul 13

    You've got to do what's right for you - but i'm not sure that i'd quit one job before the other is nailed down.

  • Jul 9

    Congrats on the new job! You're still one of us - this is a club that we won't let you leave, Snowy!

  • Jul 6

    Welcome back!

  • Jul 5

    Congrats on the new job! You're still one of us - this is a club that we won't let you leave, Snowy!

  • Jul 5

    Congrats on the new job! You're still one of us - this is a club that we won't let you leave, Snowy!

  • Jun 30

    Yikes! After working in such a hot mess i'd want to run for the hills too! Even he most inner city school with the poorest population can have a well run school IF the administration is on the ball AND communication in good. Sounds like you got the double whammy of neither. It's unfortunate. If i were in your position, i would bow out gracefully and look for a different job and perhaps attempt school nursing in a different arena where you actually have a fighting chance at thriving. Then you will still have to contend with separating the fakers from the legit stuff - but when the other aggravating factors aren't looming and you can focus, you'll find it's a heck of a lot easier.

  • Jun 29

    If you like pina colonics... and getting caught in the rain......

  • Jun 27

    Well, if that's what they want then i'd - definitely go along with it. Maybe even splurge on that $17 japanese toilet paper and brag about it in front of them. Oh, you'd like to try it? I bet you would... Honestly! Are they going to count the squares when you leave to ensure you didn't use any of their precious Charmin? You want to play those games. I think i'll bring my own chair too as the hard chair you have so generously allowed me to have hurts my back (thank you for not expecting me to stand the entire time or sit of the floor) so I think i'll bring my own chair too. Of course mentioning this to the home office is in order. They should not be treating you like an animal. I am surprised they're not charging you a fee if they run the a/c while you're there in the summer.

  • Jun 26

    It's not impossible to be a successful nurse without prior experience, but it does make it a heck of a lot easier if you have a solid base. I am not certain what you are classifying as experience in healthcare and politics - but the school district that you apply to may or may not see it as valuable.

  • Jun 22

    Can you imagine the phone call if you did wash the kids hair? I once had a second grader who took it upon herself to wash her hair with hand soap in the bathroom. Her parents were not amused but I didn't even know it happened until after ward.

  • Jun 21

    today and tomorrow - both early dismissals - a few weeks off then a bi of summer school. But that's to keep the mortgage company happy haha


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