Latest Likes For Flare

Latest Likes For Flare

Flare 17,775 Views

Joined Jul 11, '05. Posts: 2,754 (60% Liked) Likes: 6,420

Sorted By Last Like Received (Max 500)
  • Aug 26

    Students are not allowed to use their phones in school here. Doing so is a disciplinary write up, a second offense is a detention and so on.. so when I do get the calls from either the office saying that a perent is here to pick up a student that i haven;t seen, then it raises a red flag or when i get the occasional call from an irate parent that tells me that their prescious little darling called them and why didn't I call them - it all becomes pretty clear quickly. The more irate and rude the parent is with me, the more likely i am to turn the student in for unauthorized cell phone use. Ditto with the student.

    On the other hand - there have been the times that the parent hasn;t answered my calls from the office to pick the student up and in frustration i've asked the student to try with their cell phone (in front of me, with my permission - so no rules being broken) - it's amazing how those phones get picked up magically!!

  • Aug 26

    Quote from SchoolNurseTXstyle
    Ditto! I have 1300 middle school - the drama is rampant in this age group. I see 50-70 kids daily. I call if they need to go home (fever, vomiting), if they continue to keep returning to my office, head injuries. There are not enough hours in the day to call more than that. There is always a parent upset about something. I had one who I called about her daughter yesterday - she got mad that I called her during a meeting, she "knew her daughter had a stuffy nose and had given her meds before school." Kid came back again today, same temp, same stuffy nose, mom had given her meds before school same as yesterday. An hour later, she calls me yelling "how dare you not call me, she texted me saying she feels sick." How can one possibly win in THAT situation?
    oh, i'd make it a point to throw that parent on the carpet and tell her that she got upset with my call the day earlier then got upset with my not calling.
    #1, mom already knew that her darling didn't feel well, but sent her anyhow.
    #2 she got mad at you for not using your standard school nurse issued crystal ball to see that she was in a meeting and calling her (shame on you!)
    #3 her kid shouldn't have been texting in school - did she even stop to see you (it's doubtful... but see #2 and again get out your trusty standard issue crystal ball)
    #4 are we talking about a serious illness or about a minor discomfort due to the sniffles??
    #5 make up your danged mind about being called!!

  • Aug 9

    i work in my kids school. I know the meaning of bullet proof. I also know the meaning of the phrase of "i'd love to discuss this with you. why don't you call during my office hours? " It took a few times before i got the nerve to say that - and a few times that i felt like i should follow up with people about school things outside school (hey! you over there!! You still owe me a shot record!!) But i've learned to bite my tongue and know that THEY know i'm watching. And that i will call, but during business
    Yes, kids see me in the store. Yes that is wine in my cart. Your kid is probably the reason that it's there

  • Aug 3

    as long as you write up the IR in triplicate, then chart it, and have it signed by 3 administrators. We work for municipal bureaucracies so it has to be painfully inefficient

  • Jul 28

    Sorry - the forum is not very lively this time of year - i only peeked in the other day and didn't have time to make a long post.
    I ended up going from a very small school to a school 8 times its size with a completely different school population. My best piece of advice it to breathe - and don't let the kids overwhelm you. We have become a society where everyone wants everything NOW. Well, that's fine - well not fine - that's actually a whole 'nuther diatribe. But these kids have to remember that you are one person serving 900 kids.
    Prioritize the visits just as you would triage anything else coming into your office. Since these are older kids, they can probably do a lot of the smaller things like bandaids, getting ice packs, and rinsing dust out of their eyes themselves. The most you'd need to do is log their name, complaint and times. And some people establish in the older grades a sign in sheet. Personally, I think it's dicey. Yes, you can do it where you just have the kids write their names, but i'd never remember why who was there for what, and if you have them write reason for visit, then it can be a violation of privacy. Not everyone needs to know that Amanda Cardalucci needed a tampon.
    As far as the things that need your assessment- the headaches, stomachaches and general malingerers - let the kids learn how to wait a chicken licken moment. I find that's usually when i get most annoyed and over whelmed is when i am in the middle of something and i get 5 or 6 kids coming in at a time (usually right after lunch and BEFORE they have to resume class) and I often wonder to myself if these kids will use ALL their sick time by the end of January when they get into the real world.
    Again, breathe. Take it one student at a time. I usually ask the all what they need, weed out the quick ones or tend to and emergencies first.
    Larger school (and older grades) also sometimes come with fun (ha ha) extras like interscholascolastic sports and managing those physicals. That can be a pain in the rump, BUT if there is an athletic director, use him or her as a resource to help you get that job done. Remember- they need your input. No physical, no play. I use my AD to run physical to the school MD, very handy!

  • Jul 26

    You've got to do what's right for you - but i'm not sure that i'd quit one job before the other is nailed down.

  • Jul 21

    I think Nurse ABC summed it up best! Well except for the billing in my case! I don't do billing!!

  • Jul 20

    Sorry - the forum is not very lively this time of year - i only peeked in the other day and didn't have time to make a long post.
    I ended up going from a very small school to a school 8 times its size with a completely different school population. My best piece of advice it to breathe - and don't let the kids overwhelm you. We have become a society where everyone wants everything NOW. Well, that's fine - well not fine - that's actually a whole 'nuther diatribe. But these kids have to remember that you are one person serving 900 kids.
    Prioritize the visits just as you would triage anything else coming into your office. Since these are older kids, they can probably do a lot of the smaller things like bandaids, getting ice packs, and rinsing dust out of their eyes themselves. The most you'd need to do is log their name, complaint and times. And some people establish in the older grades a sign in sheet. Personally, I think it's dicey. Yes, you can do it where you just have the kids write their names, but i'd never remember why who was there for what, and if you have them write reason for visit, then it can be a violation of privacy. Not everyone needs to know that Amanda Cardalucci needed a tampon.
    As far as the things that need your assessment- the headaches, stomachaches and general malingerers - let the kids learn how to wait a chicken licken moment. I find that's usually when i get most annoyed and over whelmed is when i am in the middle of something and i get 5 or 6 kids coming in at a time (usually right after lunch and BEFORE they have to resume class) and I often wonder to myself if these kids will use ALL their sick time by the end of January when they get into the real world.
    Again, breathe. Take it one student at a time. I usually ask the all what they need, weed out the quick ones or tend to and emergencies first.
    Larger school (and older grades) also sometimes come with fun (ha ha) extras like interscholascolastic sports and managing those physicals. That can be a pain in the rump, BUT if there is an athletic director, use him or her as a resource to help you get that job done. Remember- they need your input. No physical, no play. I use my AD to run physical to the school MD, very handy!

  • Jul 17

    Sorry - the forum is not very lively this time of year - i only peeked in the other day and didn't have time to make a long post.
    I ended up going from a very small school to a school 8 times its size with a completely different school population. My best piece of advice it to breathe - and don't let the kids overwhelm you. We have become a society where everyone wants everything NOW. Well, that's fine - well not fine - that's actually a whole 'nuther diatribe. But these kids have to remember that you are one person serving 900 kids.
    Prioritize the visits just as you would triage anything else coming into your office. Since these are older kids, they can probably do a lot of the smaller things like bandaids, getting ice packs, and rinsing dust out of their eyes themselves. The most you'd need to do is log their name, complaint and times. And some people establish in the older grades a sign in sheet. Personally, I think it's dicey. Yes, you can do it where you just have the kids write their names, but i'd never remember why who was there for what, and if you have them write reason for visit, then it can be a violation of privacy. Not everyone needs to know that Amanda Cardalucci needed a tampon.
    As far as the things that need your assessment- the headaches, stomachaches and general malingerers - let the kids learn how to wait a chicken licken moment. I find that's usually when i get most annoyed and over whelmed is when i am in the middle of something and i get 5 or 6 kids coming in at a time (usually right after lunch and BEFORE they have to resume class) and I often wonder to myself if these kids will use ALL their sick time by the end of January when they get into the real world.
    Again, breathe. Take it one student at a time. I usually ask the all what they need, weed out the quick ones or tend to and emergencies first.
    Larger school (and older grades) also sometimes come with fun (ha ha) extras like interscholascolastic sports and managing those physicals. That can be a pain in the rump, BUT if there is an athletic director, use him or her as a resource to help you get that job done. Remember- they need your input. No physical, no play. I use my AD to run physical to the school MD, very handy!

  • Jul 13

    You've got to do what's right for you - but i'm not sure that i'd quit one job before the other is nailed down.

  • Jul 9

    Congrats on the new job! You're still one of us - this is a club that we won't let you leave, Snowy!

  • Jul 6

    Welcome back!

  • Jul 5

    Congrats on the new job! You're still one of us - this is a club that we won't let you leave, Snowy!

  • Jul 5

    Congrats on the new job! You're still one of us - this is a club that we won't let you leave, Snowy!

  • Jun 30

    Yikes! After working in such a hot mess i'd want to run for the hills too! Even he most inner city school with the poorest population can have a well run school IF the administration is on the ball AND communication in good. Sounds like you got the double whammy of neither. It's unfortunate. If i were in your position, i would bow out gracefully and look for a different job and perhaps attempt school nursing in a different arena where you actually have a fighting chance at thriving. Then you will still have to contend with separating the fakers from the legit stuff - but when the other aggravating factors aren't looming and you can focus, you'll find it's a heck of a lot easier.


close
close