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sirI, MSN, APRN, NP Admin 82,807 Views

Joined Jun 24, '05. Posts: 102,284 (17% Liked) Likes: 26,700

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  • Jan 15

    I am of a different opinion.

    I think a mandatory DNP will be a good idea. Yes, right now there are no real incentives such as higher salary and/or other things like traumaRUs pointed out.

    Many NPs in the beginning, such as OB-GYN NP, practiced after receiving only on-the-job training/preparation, usually a 4-year preceptorship, and sitting for a National certification. They received licensure from their individual states as licensed NPs.

    Then, MSN became mandatory to practice. One of the reasons for the shift to MSN was because 3rd party reimbursement started requiring MSN as the minimum to practice.

    I can foresee similar requirements in the future.

    NPs now who do not have an MSN can still practice in their state only (not disenfranchised), but should they relocate to another state, they would have to be minimum MSN-prepared in order to practice.

    In saying all of this, I would definitely like to see the DNP improved. Less "fluff" and more clinical preparation (like the old on-the-job trained Nps of the past). A true clinical doctorate.

  • Jan 15

    Same song, second verse.

    I actually wanted to be a Nurse growing up and did just that right after High School.

    And, from the get-go, knew that I had chosen the wrong profession.

    Marriage, children, zero support from spouse/family.

    Years go by ...

    I am an exceptional NP, have paved roads for those coming after me, have brought many a babe into this world, and am a doggone good diagnostician.

    But, if I had it to do again, knowing exactly what I know now, I would be retiring as a Physician.

    Still, in saying all of this, at this stage of my life, I can say ... no regrets.

  • Jan 14

    I am of a different opinion.

    I think a mandatory DNP will be a good idea. Yes, right now there are no real incentives such as higher salary and/or other things like traumaRUs pointed out.

    Many NPs in the beginning, such as OB-GYN NP, practiced after receiving only on-the-job training/preparation, usually a 4-year preceptorship, and sitting for a National certification. They received licensure from their individual states as licensed NPs.

    Then, MSN became mandatory to practice. One of the reasons for the shift to MSN was because 3rd party reimbursement started requiring MSN as the minimum to practice.

    I can foresee similar requirements in the future.

    NPs now who do not have an MSN can still practice in their state only (not disenfranchised), but should they relocate to another state, they would have to be minimum MSN-prepared in order to practice.

    In saying all of this, I would definitely like to see the DNP improved. Less "fluff" and more clinical preparation (like the old on-the-job trained Nps of the past). A true clinical doctorate.

  • Jan 13

    I am of a different opinion.

    I think a mandatory DNP will be a good idea. Yes, right now there are no real incentives such as higher salary and/or other things like traumaRUs pointed out.

    Many NPs in the beginning, such as OB-GYN NP, practiced after receiving only on-the-job training/preparation, usually a 4-year preceptorship, and sitting for a National certification. They received licensure from their individual states as licensed NPs.

    Then, MSN became mandatory to practice. One of the reasons for the shift to MSN was because 3rd party reimbursement started requiring MSN as the minimum to practice.

    I can foresee similar requirements in the future.

    NPs now who do not have an MSN can still practice in their state only (not disenfranchised), but should they relocate to another state, they would have to be minimum MSN-prepared in order to practice.

    In saying all of this, I would definitely like to see the DNP improved. Less "fluff" and more clinical preparation (like the old on-the-job trained Nps of the past). A true clinical doctorate.

  • Jan 4

    Before you read this new Article part II, please read the first one that introduces the RN to the world of being a Legal Nurse Consultant. It briefly goes over a few things an RN should possess before embarking upon a new, and to some, a foreign career in Nursing. Marketing as a Legal Nurse Consultant: The Key to Success Part I

    Before we get started, one thing must be made clear. Some people think that the Legal Nurse Consultant (LNC) serves as the expert witness with the case. This is not true. As a consultant, you are the "behind the scenes" person and your work is "not discoverable" by opposition.

    When you decide to take on a case from an Attorney both Attorney and LNC must be perfectly clear on your role in the case. The Attorney may want you to consult, find all good/bad things in the chart, the the Attorney may flip on you and want you to testify in a court of Law everything that you discovered. So, do some research on these 2 types of career for the RN. Do you strictly want to be a behind the scenes consultant? Or, do you want to serve as an expert witness? We can talk more about that later.

    Right now, let us get started with the Marketing Packet every LNC needs; a packet containing just about everything you will need to land that all-important first case.

    Finding/Retaining Attorney Clients - Getting Started

    Develop a business plan .

    Design a business name.

    Be professional. Check the "Secretary" of your state to ensure the name you want for your business is free/clear. If you decide to incorporate your business later, you will need a name that is not already being utilized

    Work on creating a business logo, tag line, etc.

    Use nothing comical or even hinting that it could be disrespectful. Stay professional at all times. Living in large cities, you should have no problems finding printing companies. But, if you are less fortunate, there are many online companies who are reputable as well as affordable.

    Create and purchase business cards and letterhead.

    Include business name, logo, contact information, etc. Keep color selections muted. In the beginning, you should NEVER be without a business card. You keep them in your glove compartment, behind the sun visor, briefcase/computer case, purse. Never make a contact to anyone without having a card on your person. Initially, the bulk of your first expense will be creating/purchasing the cards and letterhead.


    Finding/Retaining Attorney Clients - Initial and Follow-Up Contact

    While you are in the Getting Started phase, start developing an Attorney-Client base.

    You can get names from Attorneys you already know, phone directory, billboard ads (especially Attorneys who solicit high-profile cases). There are many ways to keep a client base available using several types of applications, software, etc.

    Purchase a laptop.

    Become very familiar with Excel and Power Point. Consider, before securing the first client, purchasing a top-notch legal software program to create reports/timelines, etc.

    Send out, via US mail, "Marketing Packets".

    Include a introduction letter, business cards, and brochures that outline the services you can provide the Defense Attorney. Be certain your introductory letter as well as business cards have contact information when the Attorney needs to get in touch with you.

    Call, Call, Call

    Wait approximately 1 week to 10 days and make an initial telephone call to each Attorney to whom you sent a packet.

    Do not contact Attorney via email.

    Some LNCs use email to establish initial contact with an Attorney. I do not and do not advise this method. A professional relationship has not been made (yet). Use email communication after the professional relationship has been established.

    Start making "cold calls".

    This is where you are dressed in professional attire and have your briefcase/laptop complete with business cards, services provided brochure, and sample case study. Cold calls are difficult, in my opinion, for you must get past the "gatekeeper". Do not be discouraged if you fail in your attempt to actually interview with the Attorney. Leave cards, brochures, and ask the gatekeeper the best time to set up an interview. I try to leave other small items for them at the front desk like hard candies, mints, pens, small note pads, etc. And, always remember have enough business cards.

    About sample case study...

    If you've never been formally educated as an LNC, you will not have this. I suggest getting in contact with other LNCs, contact The American Association of Legal Nurse Consultants, or me to help you obtain a short case study that demonstrates to the Attorney-client the professional and detailed work you can do.

    Finding/Retaining Attorney Clients - Fees

    • Charge the highest possible fee.
    • Resist the temptation to charge too low just to land the case. Instead, offer discounts and a risk-free guarantee to the clients.

    In Conclusion

    The LNC must know his/her Attorney client. Acquaint yourself with the Defense Attorneys in your state/region. Contact your state's Bar Association for quarterly periodicals and/or other information about cases that have been recently litigated.

    And, remember your very own unique selling points when marketing yourself to the Defense Attorney ...Your ultimate goal is to save the Defense Attorney time and money and assist in providing the best defense for the defendant

  • Dec 29 '16

    Same song, second verse.

    I actually wanted to be a Nurse growing up and did just that right after High School.

    And, from the get-go, knew that I had chosen the wrong profession.

    Marriage, children, zero support from spouse/family.

    Years go by ...

    I am an exceptional NP, have paved roads for those coming after me, have brought many a babe into this world, and am a doggone good diagnostician.

    But, if I had it to do again, knowing exactly what I know now, I would be retiring as a Physician.

    Still, in saying all of this, at this stage of my life, I can say ... no regrets.

  • Dec 28 '16

    If you are having difficulty about types of coverage that you do not see on a business website (FAQ, Coverage, etc.), send an email inquiry.

    For example:

    NSO has it spelled out here: What is the difference between occurrence and claims-made coverage?


    If you are not sure whether your policy through NSO is occurrence or claims-made, please email us or call us with your policy number, and we'll confirm your coverage for you.
    And, allnurses Medical Malpractice Insurance addresses the 2 types here: Is this Claims Made or Occurrence coverage?

  • Dec 27 '16

    CONGRATULATIONS, compassionresearcher!!

  • Dec 27 '16

    Same song, second verse.

    I actually wanted to be a Nurse growing up and did just that right after High School.

    And, from the get-go, knew that I had chosen the wrong profession.

    Marriage, children, zero support from spouse/family.

    Years go by ...

    I am an exceptional NP, have paved roads for those coming after me, have brought many a babe into this world, and am a doggone good diagnostician.

    But, if I had it to do again, knowing exactly what I know now, I would be retiring as a Physician.

    Still, in saying all of this, at this stage of my life, I can say ... no regrets.

  • Dec 26 '16

    Same song, second verse.

    I actually wanted to be a Nurse growing up and did just that right after High School.

    And, from the get-go, knew that I had chosen the wrong profession.

    Marriage, children, zero support from spouse/family.

    Years go by ...

    I am an exceptional NP, have paved roads for those coming after me, have brought many a babe into this world, and am a doggone good diagnostician.

    But, if I had it to do again, knowing exactly what I know now, I would be retiring as a Physician.

    Still, in saying all of this, at this stage of my life, I can say ... no regrets.

  • Dec 26 '16

    Same song, second verse.

    I actually wanted to be a Nurse growing up and did just that right after High School.

    And, from the get-go, knew that I had chosen the wrong profession.

    Marriage, children, zero support from spouse/family.

    Years go by ...

    I am an exceptional NP, have paved roads for those coming after me, have brought many a babe into this world, and am a doggone good diagnostician.

    But, if I had it to do again, knowing exactly what I know now, I would be retiring as a Physician.

    Still, in saying all of this, at this stage of my life, I can say ... no regrets.

  • Dec 26 '16

    Same song, second verse.

    I actually wanted to be a Nurse growing up and did just that right after High School.

    And, from the get-go, knew that I had chosen the wrong profession.

    Marriage, children, zero support from spouse/family.

    Years go by ...

    I am an exceptional NP, have paved roads for those coming after me, have brought many a babe into this world, and am a doggone good diagnostician.

    But, if I had it to do again, knowing exactly what I know now, I would be retiring as a Physician.

    Still, in saying all of this, at this stage of my life, I can say ... no regrets.

  • Dec 25 '16

    Same song, second verse.

    I actually wanted to be a Nurse growing up and did just that right after High School.

    And, from the get-go, knew that I had chosen the wrong profession.

    Marriage, children, zero support from spouse/family.

    Years go by ...

    I am an exceptional NP, have paved roads for those coming after me, have brought many a babe into this world, and am a doggone good diagnostician.

    But, if I had it to do again, knowing exactly what I know now, I would be retiring as a Physician.

    Still, in saying all of this, at this stage of my life, I can say ... no regrets.

  • Dec 25 '16

    Same song, second verse.

    I actually wanted to be a Nurse growing up and did just that right after High School.

    And, from the get-go, knew that I had chosen the wrong profession.

    Marriage, children, zero support from spouse/family.

    Years go by ...

    I am an exceptional NP, have paved roads for those coming after me, have brought many a babe into this world, and am a doggone good diagnostician.

    But, if I had it to do again, knowing exactly what I know now, I would be retiring as a Physician.

    Still, in saying all of this, at this stage of my life, I can say ... no regrets.

  • Dec 23 '16

    Thread moved to NCLEX forum.

    CONGRATULATIONS on passing NCLEX.


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