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mc3, LPN 19,052 Views

Joined: Jun 20, '05; Posts: 1,028 (52% Liked) ; Likes: 1,756
from US
Specialty: 12 year(s) of experience

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  • May 18

    She didn't get it working in the nursing home as a CNA. You know as much about your friends' marriage as they want you to know- no more than that.

  • May 5

    I have found that the best solution for me in these situations is to let the teacher know that from that point forward, they can assume care for the student in question, meaning they can carry out the assessment and call the parents with their medical opinion. I have a very low tolerance for disrespect, which in my opinion, is exactly what this is. I don't tell them how to each, they shouldn't tell me how to be a nurse.

  • May 5

    Quote from JenTheSchoolRN
    THIS.

    And I got proof this year! The seniors in my school that take AP Environmental Science did a lab where they basically placed crude petri dishes in several places around the school. Guess whose had the highest bacteria count? Yep - this lady!

    The nurse's office is no place for healthy people.
    Yeah half the staff here think my office is a bed and breakfast.

  • Apr 6

    The same laws and regulations protect all patients, hospice and non-hospice, from being overdosed on morphine by health care providers.

    Robbie, you just joined today and this is your first post. That plus your post itself make me think you have some specific concerns about morphine use in end of life cases. You may get better results if you state those concerns instead of asking an inflammatory question that has no basis in fact.

  • Mar 10

    Every district is hyper-sensitive and hyper vigilant now and I know you'd want them to lock a school down needlessly instead of the alternative. As I've said before I have two in HS and one in JH. I promise...it affects you much much more than it affects them. My kids relate these occurrences to me in a very nonchalant manor and then go on with their teenage life while we, as parents, feel like our guts are being ripped out with our hands tied behind our back. Yes, something has GOT to change, I believe something is changing, slowly, but at least there is movement, and hopefully these innocents won't have to experience another horror like those poor Florida students recently.

    Your boys are safe, mom.

  • Mar 10

    Yep I can relate! Yep it's super annoying. I can have 10 good interactions with parents and then one will irritate me for days. I wish I could dwell as well on all the good ones! I've been doing this for 15 yrs and the parents are getting much worse. We have so many more on drugs and in poverty now. It's more normal at my school for kids to either be raised by a grandparent or one parent because the other is on drugs and there are more single dads raising kids than ever before. It drives me crazy when a kid gets a tiny welt on them and even though I sent a note (even when I felt that was overkill) I get a phone call that they should've been called yet the same parents aren't even feeding their kids well or making sure they have a coat when it's 30 degrees out. However, then it's fun to then call them EVERY SINGLE TIME I see their child for every little thing and hear the annoyance in their voice I'm calling so much! Hey you asked for it!! HAHA!!

  • Mar 10

    oh wow. Keep on keepin on, 10+ years. I am so sorry. That is a testament to just how unbelievable parents and their littles have become. Hold your head high and breathe deeply...smell that? Spring is coming and thennnnn SUMMMERRRRRR! You can do this!

  • Mar 10

    hitting a point where the parents and their threats are becoming just too much. Im not raising your kids, I am raising my own. Im here to care for them while they are in school. Im here for emergencies and to do required screenings. If you dont want them, please dont have them.

    If they are sick, keep them home cause Im going to call and keep calling until you or your spouse/friend/mailman/grocery man comes and gets them. Stop busting my chops parents seriously you are taking the fun out of my job.
    I love being a school nurse, I dont love the politics, the drama that comes along with your little entitled snowflakes being small versions of your entitled self.
    okay, whew that felt good.

  • Feb 12

    Quote from ruby_jane
    There is a loving-kindness that elementary nurses have which, frankly, I don't possess as a high school nurse. I am in awe of you who have it, though. Your love of the littles may make you happier in the 6-8 group....although I have to say you might be happy when you find out how relatively self-reliant high schoolers are. I mean, they lie to you and they've googled their symptoms. But my diabetics require only minor reminding (checking insulin doses, not drawing them up). You have to be an excellent historian in high school. There are fewer calls to parents in HS, but the ones I have are usually doozies. Best of luck as you decide what to do.
    THIS.

    When I have to call home in HS, it is typically a bigger deal. Sport injuries. So much fatigue because no HS sleeps enough. I typically get all the sexual health stuff as well. Which I don't mind as I also teach sex ed so the kids know who they go to.

    MS students are a trial, but also a joy to see some of the major maturing they can do it 2 short years. I work with grades 7-12 and grades 7 and 8 make up high of my daily traffic alone.

  • Feb 12

    I was in an intermediate school (5-6) before switching to 9th grade. I love this age level, because they will take your advice, and not cry and throw a fit if you try to send them back to class. I would not want to work in a junior high (7-8 here), because they have lots of students in athletics, with no athletic trainers. The nurse handles all of the sports injuries and the concussion return-to-play protocol at that age level here. At my school, all athletes, band, and ROTC students have a physical on file with the trainers, and see them with their injuries.

  • Feb 12

    There is a loving-kindness that elementary nurses have which, frankly, I don't possess as a high school nurse. I am in awe of you who have it, though. Your love of the littles may make you happier in the 6-8 group....although I have to say you might be happy when you find out how relatively self-reliant high schoolers are. I mean, they lie to you and they've googled their symptoms. But my diabetics require only minor reminding (checking insulin doses, not drawing them up). You have to be an excellent historian in high school. There are fewer calls to parents in HS, but the ones I have are usually doozies. Best of luck as you decide what to do.

  • Feb 12

    Elementary now. High School would be my next choice. I have no desire to work on a turkey farm, OldDude!!!

  • Feb 12

    Quote from mc3
    The problem is, I love my littles!
    Hear ya.

  • Feb 11

    A kindergartner just came into my office here is the conversation we had.

    Kid: I need you to come to my house.
    Me: How come? What do you need?
    Kid: Well It's my goat.
    Me: Your goat?????
    Kid: Yep. My pet goat, he's had an awful cough, and you can fix it.
    Me: Are you sick?
    Kid: Nope, Just my goat.

    Apparently he "snuck" out of class to come and tell me this and teacher was missing him! Needless to say he had his recess taken and still has a sick goat. Poor Guy!

  • Feb 11

    I'm in elementary...I think I'd pick high school if I couldn't get a job on a crab fishing boat in the Bering sea or as a semen extractor on a turkey farm. Middle school...too big to be little...too little to be be big. Ugh


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