Latest Comments by littlepeopleRNICU

littlepeopleRNICU, BSN, RN 5,688 Views

Joined Oct 5, '12 - from 'SC'. littlepeopleRNICU is a RN. She has '5' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'NICU, telemetry'. Posts: 469 (40% Liked) Likes: 369

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    Quote from dmmlayton
    What school do you attend? I'm considering applying to frontier but worried about working full time and having a kid and being able to handle the workload.
    I'm not sure if you are asking me or not, but thought maybe since you mentioned full-time work. If so, I attend the University of South Carolina.

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    That's a good idea. You're welcome! Thanks, if you have any other questions, feel free to message me!

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    The part that worries me about your working schedule is clinical. I think the coursework would be able to be done with your working schedule, but in all of the clinical semesters except one, you will have at least two days of clinical a week, if not more. So having only one weekday available for clinical would make that impossible to fit in if you have to do 4 weekdays of work. If you had the option of working some on weekends, I think it would make it more realistic! The summer semester is 10 weeks and the regular semesters are 15. I would talk to an advisor and see what they recommend, as well as ask them how part-time works if you're willing to consider that. I'm not sure how clinicals work in PT study because I'm doing FT.

    For acute care, you have one preceptor a semester. You are not allowed to go to the same preceptor/group/specialty again after your initial semester with them because the school wants you exposed to variety. The first semester is internal medicine(outpatient or inpatient), and the following semesters can be inpatient internal med or a specialty. I did internal med my first clinical and am with cardiology my second.

    Yes, I feel like all of the professors have wanted students to succeed! They have been very professional and helpful. I feel like they expect graduate level maturity and effort, but they are supportive. I like the formats of the classes. They have all been with lectures and PowerPoints available to match the lectures(plus add extra in the lectures), so I feel like I'm sitting in class.

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    It honestly depends on the week and what's going on for how much I put in, but I would say maybe a very minimum of 10ish hours a class to include your lectures, reading, etc. Full-time in the program is usually 3 classes or so a semester.

    The work for grading consists of exams, papers, discussion boards, a lot of case studies, and projects. For clinicals, you have to submit clinical logs on each patient. Are you local to SC? The first clinical semester also has in-person checkoffs you have to complete. One is absolutely mandatory to be done in person and the others can be done by video. I've been told the other clinical semesters have them too, but I'm not sure yet how many.

    By getting one day off a week, do you mean you have to work 4 weekdays every week?

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    I am in a program at this school now and am attending full-time and working full-time. It really depends on how you are able to manage time, stress, and other factors in your life. I'm in my third semester now and started clinicals in my second.

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    Is this AG acute? If so, then yes, I am in my third semester of the program. I have been working and doing school both full-time. For me, FT work hours is 3 12s a week, and I work night shift.

    The number of clinical hours varies depending on which course it is. My first clinical had 98 as a requirement, which averages out to around 8 a week over the traditional semester, or 12 a week for summer semester. My next clinical is 230 hours. You are not allowed to condense clinical, so you must go each week during the semester(with the exception of breaks like Spring break-it's your call then), and you aren't allowed to do weekend clinical, or primarily night shift. The school feels like this doesn't allow for the best experience with routine daily management of patients.

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    gelli.25 likes this.

    I'm in my third semester. I've been doing school and work full-time. My first semester I had no clinicals. I started them the second. I work 3 12s(night shift) a week.

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    I think being a CNA would be beneficial, but you don't "need" to. If you are looking for a job during school, it's a great suggestion. You get your foot in the door and can network for future job opportunities when you graduate, and some nurses may even let you see some interesting things if they know you're a student.

    However, I agree that if you really can't touch stool, you may need to think your career altogether. There are MANY risks in nursing involved, and that surpasses just stool (that 9 times out of 10) you'll be wearing gloves when exposed to.

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    Quote from Rocknurse
    Are there any Adult Acute NPs working in the ER? I'd love to work in the ER but I just don't want to see kids. I used to work in an ER that only saw adults as there was a special peds ER next door. It was a perfect environment but it was in another country unfortunately.
    Not graduated, but they do at my hospital. There is a separate peds ER.

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    It also depends on your school's policy too. Mine will not let us do clinical on weekends or mostly on night shift. Sorry if you already addressed that. Like someone else mentioned, many clinics do operate only on a M-F basis, so that may even further limit your potential preceptors. I will add in there that I'm full-time at a hospital working 3 a week, and even just 3 a week with clinicals has been a little rough with the amount of work in the courses. My first semester, I didn't have clinicals, and some weeks were tough adding in the schoolwork and studying I needed, but most were fine. I started clinicals my second semester and then I noticed a big change in workload overall. That is just me though! Everyone's programs are different. I'm sure up until clinicals, 5 a week is more doable.

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    My post above should say "no weekends". It won't let me edit it now. Whoops!

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    Rocknurse likes this.

    One thing you could consider is acute care. I know several ACNPs who work in outpatient specialty clinics and have a M-F 8-5 schedule with my weekends and holidays. You have the option of that and hospital, based on your training.

    I know it's hard to leave the NICU. I am a NICU nurse and love it, but am an acute care student...even though I love the NICU as a bedside nurse, I wanted more options.

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    Nurse Malone likes this.

    I am a NICU nurse. I also am an AG-ACNP student. I do have adult experience though. I love my job as a NICU nurse, but I had the same reservations as you...I don't want to 1)not find a job when I graduate or 2) be trapped to NICU and then get burnt out 5 years after graduating and want a change.

    I work with a girl who has completed FNP school and taken boards. She has been turned down for every nursery(even well-baby) she has applied for because they want NNP or PNP. This is in several states. They even told her for nicus that they mostly want NNP and not even PNP.

    The training in most PNP programs is not specialized enough for NICU, especially in higher levels of care.

    I know it's frustrating because I was literally exactly in your place, but you have to decide if you want to include nursery in your realm of options not. I don't think you'd get into an actual NICU as an FNP, but you could POSSIBLY do well-baby.

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    I'm in school full-time and am going into my third semester. I've worked full-time the whole time so far, and that schooling includes clinical time.

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    People are successful without experience, but I do feel nursing experience is invaluable. I'm glad that I waited. I feel like you learn a LOT in the "real world" of nursing that you don't learn in nursing school. Doing over, I would do the exact same thing.

    From one previous honors BSN student to another