Content That littlepeopleRNICU Likes

Content That littlepeopleRNICU Likes

littlepeopleRNICU, BSN, RN 4,552 Views

Joined Oct 5, '12 - from 'SC'. littlepeopleRNICU is a RN. She has '5' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'NICU, telemetry'. Posts: 455 (40% Liked) Likes: 356

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  • May 22

    A cardiac ICU in an academic medical center!

  • May 21

    I have my first real NP job interview coming up! (Yay!!!) I'm incredibly intimidated by the itinerary I was sent. It's a 5 hour process! Is that fairly normal for NP interviews? Do you all have any tips for me?

  • May 18

    Quote from nursebay
    BS-just because you didn't go to one of those "crappy" schools does not make you any more qualified or high and mighty compared to others who did.
    I went the traditional route for my ASN and BSN and did not learn **** until I was in the work force. I was only as good as my preceptors that trained me-and thank god I had some excellent ones that did not carry your nasty opinion. You want high quality NP's coming into the work force, then I suggest you get off your soap box and precept if you are so damn good, but maybe you're not that good and no one should be learning from someone who has their ego and opinions so far up their ass.
    These aren't my opinions. It's my observations from being an APRN student and part of an interdisciplinary focus group on NP education in my city. The director of my clinical preceptorship site in an MD. He will not take on for profit online students or anyone without solid RN experience. We are expected at the very least- as students - to function at the level of an M4 doing SubI. The fact is that the online for profit schools cannot guarantee the quality of their students. Try telling a person that sacrificed a significant portion of their life to complete 4 years of a BS degree, 4 years of medical school, 4 years of residency and a postdoctoral fellowship - who has no concept of online schools for clinical professions because they don't exist in his world, that an online education or having no RN work experience provides adequate preparation. I could sit there and advocate for someone until I'm blue in the face - it's not going to go anywhere because there is no such thing for MD, DO, or PA and they cannot comprehend how it's even possible that these programs exist.

  • May 13

    Quote from RN to be soon
    Long story short. A life incident inspired me to study to become someone in a medical field and I thought about becoming a surgeon but I underestimated myself too much and I chose nursing. I know that doing well with nursing school doesn't mean I will do well with med too school but becoming a surgeon has been on my mind all the time and I just can't help stop thinking about going to a med school.
    Quote from RN to be soon
    Yeah I know and that's what makes me sad and regret my past. I always beat myself up for that.
    If you really have "the fire in the belly" to be an MD, cut your losses and do it -- you're not going to be happy as an RN. Do you want to still be "beating (yourself) up" 30 years from now for not going what you really wanted to?

  • May 10

    Think hard about your lifestyle...the saying, "you can have a life or save a life" is not far from the truth. Doctor's schedules are terrible and the debt that most people go into is insanity. I have no regrets about not being a doctor. I am more than my job and have other interests that I like to pursue like traveling, triathlons, and spending quality time with my family. For the doctors that I work with and the ones that I've seen in my time, that is their life. And they love it- most of them. But there are the younger ones in their 30s that hate the time they have taken away from their families...

    Is the lifestyle like that with every specialty? No. But it is for too many for comfort.

  • May 10

    I'm glad you've made a decision that you feel comfortable with OP. Everyone finds their niche in different places. I certainly hope you didn't base you decision on what synaptic has said though.

  • May 8

    Thanks so much for all of your opinions. Now that I am actually accepted into the program I am going to start reaching out. My first rotation is January of 2017. Wish me luck!

  • May 8

    I'm a single mom, started my FNP program when my daughter was about 3 or 4. Worked part time in ER/float pool about 24+ hours per week. Went to the ER my last 2 years of school, which helped a lot since not locked into 12 hours shifts, sometimes I would cover holes in the schedule, 6 hours, 4 hours or what ever, My boss would have to ask me in the mornings if I was coming on shift or going home! I would laugh at him and tell him to guess ( I figured he should be able to tell by my hair or uniform or other clues)!!!. I had tons of help from my parents taking/picking up from school, parties or other activities. When I was debating postponing my studies, my sister pointed out that she could not tell time and did not know if I had been gone for 2 hours or 12, but she would be cognizant as she got older. She was 7 when I graduated with my MSN/FNP. I taught for ten years which allowed me to be off for summer though money was tight but those summers were the best. Now at 21 she has told me that she will always remember her summers growing up. Went to Girl Scout camp 2 summers in a row, I was the camp nurse, she rode horses while I sat in the nurses cabin and gave neb treatments, meds, & pep bismol to the homesick campers.

  • May 8

    Quote from Psychcns
    Those of you with criticisms of np education should figure out how to be involved in np
    curriculuum development and accreditation of np programs. The field needs to evolve and would benefit from hearing from people with criticisms.
    But it's sooo much easier to just gripe from the sidelines ...

  • May 8

    Those of you with criticisms of np education should figure out how to be involved in np
    curriculuum development and accreditation of np programs. The field needs to evolve and would benefit from hearing from people with criticisms.

  • May 7

    Quote from Nurse Leigh
    I understood the decision to close this account, but I hope you consider opening a new one and sticking around to contribute and learn from this great place! Best of luck to you.
    I am not going to leave the community entirely, but I will be opening another account so that I can participate in it.

  • May 7

    Quote from sallyrnrrt
    It it is against TOS to recommend, but I might sugest to me, to seek RX fom my provider
    Unless OP can somehow convince the provider to backdate the script to a date BEFORE the drug screen was done, that won't help.

    And frankly, a provider who would do that...not good in my book.

  • May 7

    Quote from XNavyCorpsman
    This may sound a little harsh, but you are NOT nursing material. You took a controlled substance without a prescription. And to top this off, your mother gave it to you.
    Considering the OP isn't even a nursing student yet, I can completely believe that they didn't grasp the potential consequences of taking someone else's prescription. To the average Joe, they don't think like someone with a license to protect. It's a mistake, sounds like they've learned from it. I'd be more concerned if this were someone who was looking to cheat a drug test.

  • May 7

    Quote from XNavyCorpsman
    This may sound a little harsh, but you are NOT nursing material. You took a controlled substance without a prescription. And to top this off, your mother gave it to you.
    More than "a little." The OP made a mistake; let's not get carried away. Families share medication all the time, and most people don't realize that taking a controlled med prescribed for another family member, and shared voluntarily by that family member, is illegal. The OP's mom was trying to be helpful. I haven't heard anything yet that suggests to me that the OP is "NOT nursing material."

  • May 7

    Sadly the potential outcome of this is that you will lose your spot in the nursing program and may need to choose a different career. They have no way of knowing whether you are an addict or not. You took a substance that is only legal to take if you have been personally prescribed it ... and you have it in your system without a prescription. This is, from their viewpoint, at best an illegal act indicating a level of risk to their reputation and at worst an addiction or severe lack in judgement putting not only their program and reputation at risk but also the patients you would eventually care for under their banner. Either or both are enough to give you the boot. It is just too competitive for them to waste any time on the wherefores or the why. They have no need to coax out the truth. Why would they care when they have a list a mile long of potential hopefuls?

    I would request a retest and hope they grant it ...and if they do, hope by the time you take it that the drug has cleared your system.


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