Latest Comments by gonzo1

Latest Comments by gonzo1

gonzo1 15,919 Views

Joined Jun 8, '05. Posts: 1,672 (45% Liked) Likes: 2,329

Sorted By Last Comment (Past 5 Years)
  • 0

    Lot's of jobs in Texas. Lot's of places will hire new grads even into ICU and ER. Lot's of psych jobs down here to. I have found the working conditions in Texas to be pretty good. I know where you can get a night psyche job tomorrow. Just saying.

  • 1
    MaxAttack likes this.

    A couple of weeks ago I got a new admit. I always go over the meds that I'm giving a pt before I give them. The patient said he doesn't take one particular med so like an idiot I didn't give it, and I didn't call the doc to talk to him about it. Turns out it was a new med ordered for the pt. The doctor wasn't mad at me or anything (I got lucky). But I should have called the doc and clarified the med before I held it on my own.
    Unfortunately this is a system breakdown because our docs don't talk to the nurses about their plan of care for the patient (ICU). If our docs would say "you're getting this pt and I'm doing this and this" it would provide for a more seamless transition from ER to ICU.

  • 2
    nrsang97 and Jolie like this.

    Good luck on your first job. Sounds like you have a good outlook and should do well. I had my teeth out and only needed 1-2 days recovery.

  • 0

    I hear you Nursebird and feel your pain. I work on a really small unit too. It seems like the nurses rush through all required pt care tasks in order to get back to FB or Amazon as quickly as they can. There's a lot of sleeping too. It used to piss me off to the point that I went and got the same job at another institution and wow, it's the same exactly.
    I'm at least ten years older than the next oldest nurse so there's a little bit of a generation gap maybe.
    At one job I had the CEO walked through the unit ( a big unit) and reported to our director that not one nurse looked up at him as he was going through, or acknowledged his presence. He said everyone was reading a book, or playing on the internet or their phone. Consequently phones and internet usage was ordered to stop. It didn't, but people did start looking to see who was walking by at least.
    I finally stopped paying attention to what other nurses were doing, for the most part and just do what feels right to me.
    Of course if the racial problems are directed at you, or you are hearing them directed to someone else you have to speak up about that.

  • 3
    nrsang97, Kitiger, and ellebee87 like this.

    You very well may have saved that patients life. I've been on coumadin and 12 mg daily is a massive dose for almost any patient. The other people are mad at you because they are now on the hook for fraudulent charting, having charted it given when it was not. The fact that the wrong doctor was called is on the RN, not you. But kudos to both of you for addressing this problem. Hold your head high at work and do not speak of this issue further with anyone, you are legally in the right and don't owe them any explanations.
    Your future patients are lucky to have you as their nurse and their advocate.

  • 4

    I lived near this hospital as well for most of my nursing career and worked in it in another capacity. I never considered working there as a nurse. I know numerous people who live within a ten mile radius of it but drive twenty five miles or more to work in other hospitals. I also have several friends who worked there for a short time and quit due to the poor environment.
    To be fair I do know one person who worked there as a nurse and loves it.

  • 3

    The first thing I do is look to see if the medication order came with any parameters. Often blood pressure meds will say hold if systolic less than 90 etc.
    I just completed a legal class while working on my BSN and that class teaches/preaches that you must always notify the MD that you are holding, or want to hold a med.
    This is easy where I work nights (ICU) because we have a secure messaging system where you send the doc a text message that you have done something and they can reply or not, but at least you have notified them. This helps cover your a$$.

  • 0

    I sent you a private message

  • 1
    TheCommuter likes this.

    Just wanted to let everyone know that I did my CEN recert online recently. It costs more but you have 30 days to go through the test. It's kind of like learning/refreshing knowledge while testing.
    I thought it was a great experience and I highly recommend it.
    On a funny note; I figured that since it is an open book test I would get a great grade, but it's a difficult test and I scored lower than I expected. So don't think it's an easy way out.

  • 2
    vintagemother and Hibbzem17 like this.

    They are going to love you. Most ER nurses are not happy about having psych patients, they scare them. You will be greatly appreciated because you have a level of confidence with them that ER nurses don't. You'll learn the ER stuff quick enough. Good luck and enjoy. I work ER, ICU and psyche and they are always excited to have a psych nurse around to take the pressure off. Funny enough the psych unit is always excited to have an ER, ICU nurse around because it makes them feel safer.

  • 3

    My problem has always been that I feel the patients pain/discomfort. It has taken me years of telling myself, "its their pain, not mine."

  • 0

    I have had all of the mentioned nightmares including my teeth falling out. Occupational hazard I guess. I also dream that I'm at school and can't get my locker open to get my work, so I don't get to class on time. I also dream that I forgot to go to a class for the whole semester.
    The weirdest dream is that I screwed up and didn't really graduate from high school, but I'm already a nurse so I tell myself I guess they aren't going to come after me and take my license away since I've been a nurse for over 12 years.
    The goofy thing is I was a tiny bit of a slacker in high school but in college x 2 degrees I have a 4.0and a 3.9 so obviously not a slacker, but in my convoluded little sleepy brain I'm a looser. LOL

  • 2
    TriciaJ and Nurse4592 like this.

    I once had a nurse manager scream and yell at me, and throw something when I put in my notice. Some people are just nuts. I was the 6th person filling the job in just over 1 year, so that pretty much explains it all. Move on, she's pi**ed and she is probably going to make you a no hire so just forget about it. Good luck and enjoy your new job.

  • 4

    Everywhere I've ever worked this would be a huge no no. I myself rarely look at another persons chart and then only if I have something to do with that patient. Working ER I was in other patients charts because we would routinely do meds, or casts etc. In the ICU it is more rare.
    I actually live with the fear of being in trouble for doing this, but do look if it's appropriate for me to do.
    I have accidentally looked at ER pt charts while in the ICU because I thought I was getting the pt and then I don't
    You will not get into trouble for someone else being in your chart, that is all on them. As far as reporting it etc, maybe I would tell them to stay out, but not report because you will be leaving soon anyway and you won't be able to change the culture of a unit during your 3 month stay. I used to do travel nursing and the charge nurses and other nurses were often in my charts to make sure I was charting per their norm. Did I like it, no, but I really didn't care because I chart pretty good. Have never been told my charting wasn't right.

  • 3
    canoehead, Loracs72, and LadyFree28 like this.

    Lots of ICUs and ERs don't like new grads. That is, the nurses don't want new grads in the unit. I wonder if this is what is going on. I worked in one ICU where we took and loved new grads, in the other one sadly, a new grad would have been bullied off the unit. I'm not like that but I've seen it several times.
    And in my opinion, if the other nurse was in the room with the pt then it is her problem, not yours.


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