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gonzo1 20,195 Views

Joined Jun 8, '05. Posts: 1,728 (46% Liked) Likes: 2,465

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  • Oct 22

    As a past member of my hospital's ethics council with MD's, I say "yes". It is definitely an ethics question. We had an elderly Chinese man who spoke no English. His family members were the translators. I'm not sure how it was found out, but the family only translated what they wanted him to know. They never told him how serious his medical condition was. It was his case that prompted my hospital to use the AT&T translation service using speaker phones. This now allows any patient to be told in his own language the things a health professional needs to say from a translator who has been taught and understands medical terminology, without relying on the family to pass on incorrect information.

  • Oct 15

    Quote from Kyrshamarks
    Heck, I work with nurses that have no brains. A thumb would be nothing
    Attachment 25077

  • Oct 15

    Heck, I work with nurses that have no brains. A thumb would be nothing

  • Oct 15

    The reason you do CPR is because the person is already dead. There is no killing someone who is dead already. Maybe your instructor was the one that needs some instruction.

  • Oct 15

    I had someone take a special interest in me at my initial CPR training class too. I am small boned, so I think she was worried I couldn't do it hard enough. Whatever, on my first day of nurse residency orientation we had to practice codes on dummies and the RN watching me said, "Wow, it's always the little ones that turn out to give really strong compressions!" It must be overcompensation

  • Oct 15

    My whole family told me I shouldn't be a nurse. It took me years to finally decide to ignore them. My boss, coworkers, and patients confirm on a regular basis that I made the right choice. Don't let anyone tell you where you should be.

  • Oct 15

    Next time I take CPR, I plan to sing "Staying Alive" while attempting to resuscitate, check for an organ donor card, and then stab the manikin while retrieving the precious heart.

  • Oct 15

    I wouldn't even waste thinking space over such a declasse' human being. You know who you are and where you stand and what you're capable of. Unfortunately, on the journey to success you will encounter characters that are less than ideal, unhelpful, and downright rude, like this instructor. You handled it very maturely and probably better than I would have. I'd say 50% of being a nurse is stuff that's already built-in, like compassion, empathy, and kindness. If you have those and the heart to serve, then the technicalities of nursing can be learned later through schooling. I didn't come from a medical background myself, never was a CNA or anything before nursing school, so I started off learning from scratch, just like you. I turned out just fine. I commend you for staying classy.

  • Oct 15

    The first time I took a CPR class, when I was 19 or so, the instructor clearly didn't like nurses at all. He badmouthed them throughout the entire class. Not sure what his problem was, but I could see him acting like this, too. People can be jerks, and people sometimes get a big head and feel superior to their students.

    Also, this reminds me of when I was in driver's ed in high school. My instructor said to me, "it's obvious you haven't driven before." Well, no, sir, I'm 15 and that's...illegal...

  • Sep 18

    If your cardiac monitors have ST segment alarms use them. Get into the habit at the beginning of your shift of checking for correct lead placement and setting ST alarms. It may be your first indication somethings wrong with your patient.

  • Sep 18

    I haven't cried since Mama died in 2008... until I read this. And I remember all the times we coded patients, I remember not the names but the outcomes. And I cried in failure and later on in frustration as to WHY people have to die away from their loved ones most of the time. Thank you Butterfly-as usual you put the words down I would like to have said.

  • Sep 18

    I have cried quite a few times at work. The worst for me was the 88 year old man who I was discharging to a rehab facility to get stronger from a fall before going home. His wife who had recently had a stroke was at a LTC facility. He would call her every night and visit her every day when he was home. THe rehab facility was not the same one his wife was at and all he wanted to do was to be with her. He sobbed continuously through the D/C process and while he was being wheeled out the door to be transported by EMS. He just kept saying over and over that he would never see his wife again. I cried with him. I will never foget how heart breaking that was or that patient. I was completely drained for hours after that.
    He did eventually need LTC and was able to be placed in the same facility with his wife.

    THe other thing that kills me is when I see sons and daughters crying over their elderly parents. It reminds me of just how special our mothers are and how much they are loved. I usually tear up with them.

  • Aug 16

    no you are wrong. the hospital can still turn your license in to the BON and you can still be prosecuted. don't ever feel safe no matter who you work for. a patient or family can turn your license in. you are very foolish to think you are safe. get malpractice insurance and chart carefully. your company will not stand be home you if you are let go by the hospital through your company. I know I have been there as the supervisor at the facility wrote me up 3 times without my knowledge and I was let go. I said when was I written up and what was the reason? the company did not know but I was unable to use them for a job. I had to go to a different company. Think again, Nurse, you are not safe.

  • Aug 16

    Come out to the floor and take care of just one patient all day and you will understand

  • Aug 16

    Been there, done that, got the claw marks on my back to prove it. People can forgive anything but a manager who's risen through the ranks. It's the most thankless job there is, and I feel your pain, OP. ((((HUGS))))


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