Content That gonzo1 Likes

Content That gonzo1 Likes

gonzo1 16,205 Views

Joined Jun 8, '05. Posts: 1,689 (45% Liked) Likes: 2,385

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  • Jul 22

    My "Psych Career" began when I took a position as Intake Coordinator for an Addiction Treatment Facility. Before that, I was all ICU, ER, Flight Nurse, Level I Trauma, Military Combat Casualty Care, Paramedic, O.R.; go, go, go. Do, do, do. !!! This need to succeed was beat into my brain practically from birth by parents, teachers, military superiors, TV ads, internet ads, billboards, etc. etc., etc. My entire identity was totally defined by what I could do and how well I could do it; i.e., better than other people.
    I eventually crashed and burned, almost losing my hard-earned license, my career, my family and my life. Personal morals and ethics became non-existent, as long as I was the Golden Boy and didn't get caught.
    I have had several mental health diagnoses but overall, my problem was me. The sum total of my genetics, my upbringing, my life, my experiences. I found in Psych Nursing the opportunity to use this amalgamation of living to help others who, while not having identical situations, have bits and pieces that I can help them with. I am borrowing from a twelve step program here but; I share my experience, strength and hope with patients entrusted to my care. The essence of Nursing for me has always been being able to help others who would "do" for themselves if they had these three things in their own lives; experience, strength and hope. The Psych Nurse career path started in 1992 and continues today. I have been a Registered Nurse since 1975 and currently work as a Travel Nurse at a facility for Forensic Competency Restoration. ALL of my 24 patients have serious (some very serious) mental illness diagnoses and have "allegedly" committed crimes, from trespassing to murder. My job today, my reason for being here every day is to help these tortured souls to cope with their lot in life. I cannot affect their legal proceedings but I can, and will, help them any way I can to make the most of the hand they are dealt. I will retire next year but continue my work with Veterans like me who need a helping hand.
    I don't know if this answers any questions or even is on-topic. But, this is where I am, warts and all, for whatever us I can be.

  • Jul 22

    what about rolling the stretcher to the ice machine and tell patient's to open his/her mouth? That's direct entry without cross contaminating!

  • Jul 21

    Don't feel bad at all. Some people just can't be helped. She sounds like she just want to use the excuse that she has ADD instead of doing anything about it.
    If she really wanted to get good grades & get into a PT program, she would do whatever it took. But she expects you to do her work so that she can get the credit. That doesn't fly with me.
    If she doesn't take your study tips, I'd bow out. You are not responsible for her grades. If she just wants to rest on her excuses then that's fine. But don't feel 1 oz of guilt.

  • Jul 21

    You're not wrong to set boundaries. Sounds like she wants you to drop everything and come to her assistance because you're naturally smart and chose an easy program, whereas she has ADD and chose a challenging program. At least it suits her to think that.

    I get that you aren't about to drop your own studies and run to rescue her. Can you give her some help on your terms? Is there a time you can set aside easily to offer to help her? I don't mean help her learn her course material. Just reiterate the study habits that work for you and cheer her on as she incorporates them.

    If she takes you up on it she will benefit and you won't feel like a terrible friend. If she refuses, because she prefers to have you at her beck and call and she really wants you to do her work for her, oh well. You still don't have to feel like a terrible friend because you tried and she is not being much of a friend to you.

  • Jul 19

    I am a bit worried that it might make her feel uncomfortable if you regularly need to go to her floor. If you were on a totally different floor, and didn't need to go to hers that would be different. But if she isn't interested and says no then she might feel odd when she sees you.

    If you decide to do it, then mention it in a very casual way. If you take the chance I think your plan is a decent one. Move very slowly and watch her reaction to make sure she doesn't seem uncomfortable.

    As far as rumors go, I started dating somebody in the building where I work (ended up getting married), and the rumor mill was insane. I would have said I didn't care what people say, but the reality of it was way worse than what I imagined. It got old fast to be the center of attention. And the intensity of the interest was FAR more than anticipated. I really wished I didn't have to deal with it at work, but I am happy I met him so it equals out.

  • Jul 19

    I don't see a problem with it as long as she is single and willing but I personally would not want to meet for coffee at the hospital cafe. Just my experience that keeping your work and your personal life separate is always the best policy. Chances are anyone sees the two of you even innocently having coffee and rumors will fly.

  • Jul 19

    Human weakness is part of life, and I learned early to accept reality. In some not so small way, many of us would be out of a job if everyone was perfect.

  • Jul 19

    Quote from whichone'spink
    Why isn't this post more popular?
    Because it was posted in the General Nursing Discussion forum, not the Emergency Nursing forum.

    OP, I feel you- and I guarantee there are many, many other ED nurses who feel you, too.

    Just as we're asked to understand the intertwined environmental and psychosocial factors that drive patient behaviors such as "non-compliance", drug seeking, ED and EMS abuse, etc, and recognize these behaviors as symptoms of larger societal problems, I see ED staff burnout as a symptom of these same societal problems, and I will not judge you for it.

    Understanding these things and providing compassionate care to people in need is not synonymous with enabling irresponsibility, learned helplessness, and lack of any personal accountability. It is a difficult line to walk, and can exact a heavy price when your defenses are down because you put your heart into your work.

    Thank you for giving of yourself to help others in need. I'm sorry the personal cost was so great, and I hope that you are able to find peace in the future, knowing that you did make a difference to someone. I know you did.

    Take care!

  • Jul 19

    Quote from macawake
    Are those two my only options..

    While I actually agree with you that there are many negative aspects/risks with a profit-driven healthcare system (I'm not in the US, I work in a different system), I felt more motivated to address what I saw as a borderline(?) misanthropic view of humanity.

    Unfortunately for you, you managed to touch on two of my pet peeves.
    I don't like the sense of superiority and callousness that I sensed vis-à-vis drug addicts. And I don't like the school of thought that says that the nurse unilaterally gets to decide how much pain a patient is experiencing.

    From reading some of your previous posts it does sound like you might have experienced burnout in your previous ER job and as I said, it's a good thing that you've made a change. What I don't understand is why when you according to your OP in this thread, have found a new job where you're happy, keep focusing on negative things?

    I used to work in the ER and prior to becoming a nurse I was in law enforcement. I must have met a gazillion drug addicts. I never let them bring me down. Doing so is a choice. Not letting it happen is also a choice. It probably helps that I don't look at them as being the scum of the earth. If anything, their lives just reminded me about how lucky I have been with many things in my life. I have no way of knowing if that couldn't have been me if I'd been born to different parents, in a different place or been raised under different circumstances. Who knows what would have become of me?
    All this I was also bothered by the patient-blaming. Sure, there are noncompliant patients with chronic illnesses.

    But there are also patients who developed chronic illnesses as a result of a lifetime of poverty, low education, lack of medical care, and poor diet (diabetes in particular is a disease of poverty in countries of affluence, where highly processed carbohydrates are the only affordable food options). If you can't muster up a speck of compassion for a single patient because you're so angry at a few who know better but don't do better, I'm not really interested in a conversation.

  • Jul 19

    I think it's good you are not at the beside and caring for people.

    Good for YOU and good for THEM. Win-win.

  • Jul 19

    Quote from whichone'spink
    Why isn't this post more popular?
    Paragraph 2 and Paragraph 5 would be why it wouldn't be "popular" with me.

  • Jul 19

    Yes. I was up in Thomasville, Ga. when I saw a report about this on the local Hee-Haw news station. It happened in Titusville, Fl. Not much changes down through the years. For some reason hospital administration would rather project the illusion of safety for PR purposes rather than ever let on that hospitals have been, are and will continue to be filled with and visted by unpredictable and dangerous individuals.
    I have often wondered, but not for long, why some hospitals take the threat to their employees seriously while others live the dream. Maybe it's because the CEO of the this "soft" security hospital is at home at night snuggling under the comforter with the air turned up. You know, out of sight, out of mind.
    But they say cops have a dangerous job. So doesn't it logically follow and seriously beg the question as to how one 90 pound nurse can be asked to take care of one 280 pound PCP overdosed patient in an ED after being hog-tied with leathers and hand-cuffed by six burly boys in blue in the field and then layed on your doorstep with a "call us when he's better."

  • Jul 19

    Quote from Rose_Queen
    I work in a unit that is locked down 24/7. After 9pm, there is only 1 door open into the facility, and security has to let you in beyond the ER. Our security guards are armed, and most are moonlighting off duty cops. Even in the downtown area of a city that has its fair share of stabbings, shootings, and other criminal activity, I do what I need to to feel safe. If that means asking security for an escort to my car late at night, they do it.
    Hello Ms Rose!

    I think our security team is getting an overhaul. No more aged pensioners picking up shifts or little ladies just getting some hours. We'll have ex-police and military who meet certain physical agility requirements and some of whom are armed keeping up with our safety. I so look forward to it.

  • Jul 19

    I don't know details on how exactly those unarmed guards subdued the shooter, but holy smokes what stones on those folks! Those guards wouldn't be paying for their own lunches for the rest of the year(at a minimum) if I worked on that unit.

  • Jul 19

    Quote from MillennialNurse

    What really scares me is that this travel nurse that many of the "in-crowd" disliked had a hallway patient start to really decline, and the patient needed to be moved into a room for more aggressive interventions. People helped her physically move the stretcher into a room, and then they left her to perform/facilitate these interventions by herself. They just went back to the nurses' station. I'm terrified that the other nurses don't like me--and as a result, I won't get help when I need it.

    Just reaching out to see if other new nurses have had similar experiences, and what they've done about it. Thanks!
    I've seen this happen, only it was a charge nurse that would pull resources away from the nurse she didn't like, so she'd be in the room by herself with a crumping patient. She also had "pets", people that she gave preferential treatment to, by giving them the most coveted assignments and putting others that she didn't like as much in the less desirable area, and then hammering them with ambulances all day/night long. The problem was that this person was besties with the unit manager, so any complaints to the manager just made things worse. Fortunately, I was never on her radar, but I observed this behavior very clearly, and yes, it is scary.

    We also had the "cliques"- those little circles of friends that all knew each other outside of work, were friends on Facebook, would go out drinking together, and would ask to be assigned to the same zones all the time. If you had the misfortune of being assigned in the same zone as one of the cliques, you were the outsider and couldn't rely on others to help out when you were drowning, because the cliques would be busy hiding around the corner gossiping, hanging out in the break room on potluck night, or standing around the charge nurse's desk talking about what cute thing their kid did, their vacation plans, horses, dogs, the next marathon they were training for, whether that hot paramedic was single, etc, while all hell was breaking loose around them.

    I think the advice in the post above is pretty good. I would avoid going toe to toe with the cliques- that would be like poking the bear. Just go to work and do your job the best you can, while cultivating supportive relationships with others who haven't been sucked into the toxic culture. Alternatively, look for work elsewhere. Not all EDs are like this.


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