Content That gonzo1 Likes

Content That gonzo1 Likes

gonzo1 15,323 Views

Joined Jun 8, '05. Posts: 1,655 (45% Liked) Likes: 2,296

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  • Apr 28

    This decision isn't difficult for nurses who know people who sustained spinal cord or traumatic brain injuries after they fell asleep while driving after night shift.

  • Apr 28

    I too noticed at my hospitals, 100% of the new grads in the new grad programs are in their 20's. What you can do is apply as clinical nurse II since you already have experience. My hospital hired me as clinical nurse II even though my "experience" was 4 months in my old job. My orientation was 6 weeks and I was pretty much treated like a new grad, just not officially. Overall the 6 weeks was not too bad, I actually couldn't wait to get off orientation because my preceptor had mood swings.

    I now have 1 year acute care experience and what a difference in being "hire-able" to other employers. I have had to turn down interviews from other hospitals that snubbed me when I had zero acute care experience.

  • Apr 28

    New (cheap) grads are a dime a dozen. So, the question is what kind of new grad RN is any given hospital wanting to hire? Why would they want a young dummy over someone with multiple bona fides?

    This is my cynical side at play here, but in my opinion new grads with previous degrees and proven track records might be less desirable, simply by virtue of the fact that they probably will not be as malleable and naive. In other words, they do not make good "plug-in's."

    Even age itself might be perceived as an over-qualification. You know too much.

  • Apr 28

    Based on my own exposure to hiring practices in many organizations, I know that ageism is alive and well - but good luck proving it. This type of discrimination is just about impossible to prove because offenders will always be able to show that 'other' criteria were used to make the selection decision. Case law on terminations indicates that it must be easier to prove in those cases.

    IMHO, this is one of those issues that is deliberately ignored by the people painting a rosy picture encouraging second career & older students to enter nursing programs. Maybe the bias is related to the fact that the young ones are more likely to be compliant and less likely to make a fuss about working conditions. . . rather than simply age.

  • Apr 28

    Your license is safe. There were other nurses in the building, you gave report and handed over the keys before you left. That is not abandonment. Shame on the DON for trying to scare you with that threat!

  • Apr 28

    Thank you KCMnurse, I feel a lot better knowing my license won't be touched. I also just registered and paid for my nclex-RN, so it would totally suck to be denied ability to do it after all the sweat I put into school....I can breathe a little now. Thanks for your input

  • Apr 28

    Calm down sister. I am Director of Nursing in a skilled nursing facility in Florida and although the states are different and some laws may be most are still the same. If you counted the narcotics and gave report to a licensed nurse employed at the facility then there is nothing anyone can do to you. I'm not sure I would fight the termination because it does not sound like your DON has common sense but if you really want to remain employed there I would report the occurrence to the corporate office. What you immediately need to do is prepare a factual statement of the events and sign and date it. Do not rely on your memory later on if it comes to that. In your statement you need to state who you counted with and gave report to and the conversation that took place including the nurse's willingness to take the keys. Hope this helps and do not let a bad DON make you think your nursing career is over.

  • Apr 24

    In my head I would have responded "Thank you value based purchasing!"

  • Apr 24

    Quote from TheCommuter
    Making another individual happy (or mad) is an impossibility. We are not responsible for the feelings of other people, including our patients.

    The nurse's job is to provide competent care that will meet the patient's health needs and result in acceptable outcomes. However, we do not have the magic switch to flip that provides instantaneous happiness to people, nor will we ever.
    Meanwhile, HCAHPS and Press Gainey are busy educating the public otherwise.

  • Apr 24

    At least you did not have to inform the patient that you are a nurse, not a prostitute. Yes, some will brazenly ask.

  • Apr 24

    Making another individual happy (or mad) is an impossibility. We are not responsible for the feelings of other people, including our patients.

    The nurse's job is to provide competent care that will meet the patient's health needs and result in acceptable outcomes. However, we do not have the magic switch to flip that provides instantaneous happiness to people, nor will we ever.

  • Apr 24

    I would deflect it back onto them with some sort of phrase such as; Happiness is an inside job. Don't assign anyone else that much power over your life.

  • Apr 24

    IMO, it's not even "your job" to make them healthy; for some people that's an impossible, unattainable goal (and there's only so much we can do to undo the damage people have done to themselves). Our job is to provide nursing care, end of story. Happiness and health are up to the individuals.

  • Apr 23

    This is called an unregulated blood tranfusion.
    I have thouroughly researched this for PICU and PEDS. You can return waste on a central line using a closed system and a heparinized syringe . However, you would need a Md. order (at least) . The Infusion Nursing Society does not support this practice.Where I work they even return waste on peripherals(not evidenced based paractice) However I do not and will not return waste on peripherals untill my management can provide me with some research.....(still waiting, it has been 2 years)
    If blood volume is crucial one should consider alternate means of collecting a sample, as in I-stat .
    The waste volume depends on the type of line your patient has.

  • Apr 23

    Quote from burn out
    A recent memo from our Lab director stated that central line draws (which are only done by RNs) are twice as likely to be contaminated than peripheral sticks by phlebotomist(this was on blood cultures). I think I will continue to throw away the waste.

    Personally, I think the high infection rate on central lines is more likely due to Nurse's giving IVPs through ports in the line that have been laying under the pt, hanging on the floor, etc., without even wiping the port with alcohol. :smackingf I don't think it has as much to do with returning blood, not that I think that's a good practice anywhere besides Peds either.


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