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gonzo1 20,425 Views

Joined Jun 8, '05. Posts: 1,728 (46% Liked) Likes: 2,466

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  • Nov 3

    I always steer away from people who make statements like, "I always say." Mental health issues run the course from someone who is afraid of spiders, to psychopaths. I think we would be hard pressed to find anyone that doesn't have some sort of at least small fear or phobia. I work ICU, ER and psyche and have seen nutsy nurses in all these positions.

    From my experience a person who is really mentally ill won't stay in psyche nursing very long because they aren't really there for the patients, but to help themselves. I've seen a couple who only lasted a few months. Just like all other types of nursing there are all kinds of nurses who work psyche, some are extremely well adjusted people from normal homes and some have issues of their own. It's this mix of personalities that make for a strong unit where everyone can learn and grow.
    EKUGRAD, you sound like an awesome person and they are lucky to have you.

  • Oct 21

    I've encountered several "challenged" nurses over the years, deformed hands, arms, deaf (with hearing aids). They were all awesome.

    Go for it.

  • Oct 15

    I've encountered several "challenged" nurses over the years, deformed hands, arms, deaf (with hearing aids). They were all awesome.

    Go for it.

  • Oct 5

    Now 60 and just started working on my BSN. I know a lady that's 64 and just got her BSN. Now she's working on her masters.

  • Oct 5

    I didn't even start nursing school till I was 45. Went to ICU age 55.

  • Sep 18

    In 15 years of nursing I've had many managers. The three that were loved by everyone wore scrubs to work and often helped us with the worst patients. Taking the time to do this with your nurses now that you are their manager will be an invaluable investment in the unit culture and cohesiveness. I've only been "free" charge, never management, but it makes a huge difference if you go back to the trenches once in a while with your nurses.

  • Sep 10

    Commuter-I so respect you. I do ER and ICU and before that I did physical therapy. I did go for the hospital job. But, you are right, it is not the only avenue. You touched on every hot spot of why most nurses hate the hospital. And most of us that work there are simply hostages to the higher pay.

    It is refreshing to have someone, after careful review, decide to take the non-traditional route. You are absolutely right, nurses are needed all over. Not just in hospitals. The patients/clients you are going to be working with are very lucky to be getting you. Best of wishes to you in your new adventure.

  • Sep 1

    I worked ER for about 9 years, then went to ICU and am going on 5 years there. Both are considered "specialties" for good reason. The difference comes into play that in the ER everything is explore and stabilize, while in ICU you are tweaking and doing long term management. Both specialties require nurses to have great critical thinking skills and be able to multitask on a very high level.

    In a way ICU is easier because you usually already know what the patients major malfunction is when you get them. In the ER you have to be a detective and try to figure out what the problem is.

    Both ER and ICU nurses have to know how to code a patient, give lots of blood, titrate dopamine, fentanyl, and a bunch of other drugs. I do think it's easier to go from ER to ICU because as an ER nurse you learn to just deal with whatever comes through the door. I see a lot of ICU nurses who don't like the uncertainty, and will say, "I'm not ready to take another patient." In the ER we don't have that option. They just keep coming in no matter how busy we are.

    Let's stop looking to see who is "better" or what ever, and start to appreciate the importance of each area of nursing. We are all highly trained individuals.

  • Aug 29

    Squeezed endless bags of blood into a trauma pt who still died on the way to OR.
    Started bunches of IVs. Swabbed throats for strep cultures.
    Lots of EKGs
    Told a pt with a concussion they were in the ER after a car accident 400 times. Fortunately, no serious injuries.
    Placed a couple foleys
    Did a "rape" exam
    Held pressure on a bleeding femoral artery until the doc could sew it up
    Good question, and I look forward to reading all the replies

  • Aug 20

    I worked ER for about 9 years, then went to ICU and am going on 5 years there. Both are considered "specialties" for good reason. The difference comes into play that in the ER everything is explore and stabilize, while in ICU you are tweaking and doing long term management. Both specialties require nurses to have great critical thinking skills and be able to multitask on a very high level.

    In a way ICU is easier because you usually already know what the patients major malfunction is when you get them. In the ER you have to be a detective and try to figure out what the problem is.

    Both ER and ICU nurses have to know how to code a patient, give lots of blood, titrate dopamine, fentanyl, and a bunch of other drugs. I do think it's easier to go from ER to ICU because as an ER nurse you learn to just deal with whatever comes through the door. I see a lot of ICU nurses who don't like the uncertainty, and will say, "I'm not ready to take another patient." In the ER we don't have that option. They just keep coming in no matter how busy we are.

    Let's stop looking to see who is "better" or what ever, and start to appreciate the importance of each area of nursing. We are all highly trained individuals.

  • Aug 16

    Squeezed endless bags of blood into a trauma pt who still died on the way to OR.
    Started bunches of IVs. Swabbed throats for strep cultures.
    Lots of EKGs
    Told a pt with a concussion they were in the ER after a car accident 400 times. Fortunately, no serious injuries.
    Placed a couple foleys
    Did a "rape" exam
    Held pressure on a bleeding femoral artery until the doc could sew it up
    Good question, and I look forward to reading all the replies

  • Aug 16

    Squeezed endless bags of blood into a trauma pt who still died on the way to OR.
    Started bunches of IVs. Swabbed throats for strep cultures.
    Lots of EKGs
    Told a pt with a concussion they were in the ER after a car accident 400 times. Fortunately, no serious injuries.
    Placed a couple foleys
    Did a "rape" exam
    Held pressure on a bleeding femoral artery until the doc could sew it up
    Good question, and I look forward to reading all the replies

  • Aug 15

    I didn't even become a nurse until I was 45. Still loving it 15 years later. Do it!!!!!!!

    Oh....and I plan on working for a long time.

  • Aug 5

    I would be very leery of any job that says' "only on nights". If it's legal why don't they do it on days too?

    answer: Too many prying eyes to get away with it.

    Run away fast.

  • Aug 5

    I would be very leery of any job that says' "only on nights". If it's legal why don't they do it on days too?

    answer: Too many prying eyes to get away with it.

    Run away fast.


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