Latest Likes For gonzo1

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gonzo1 15,543 Views

Joined Jun 8, '05. Posts: 1,659 (45% Liked) Likes: 2,306

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  • May 21

    Lots of ICUs and ERs don't like new grads. That is, the nurses don't want new grads in the unit. I wonder if this is what is going on. I worked in one ICU where we took and loved new grads, in the other one sadly, a new grad would have been bullied off the unit. I'm not like that but I've seen it several times.
    And in my opinion, if the other nurse was in the room with the pt then it is her problem, not yours.

  • May 17

    Everywhere I've ever worked this would be a huge no no. I myself rarely look at another persons chart and then only if I have something to do with that patient. Working ER I was in other patients charts because we would routinely do meds, or casts etc. In the ICU it is more rare.
    I actually live with the fear of being in trouble for doing this, but do look if it's appropriate for me to do.
    I have accidentally looked at ER pt charts while in the ICU because I thought I was getting the pt and then I don't
    You will not get into trouble for someone else being in your chart, that is all on them. As far as reporting it etc, maybe I would tell them to stay out, but not report because you will be leaving soon anyway and you won't be able to change the culture of a unit during your 3 month stay. I used to do travel nursing and the charge nurses and other nurses were often in my charts to make sure I was charting per their norm. Did I like it, no, but I really didn't care because I chart pretty good. Have never been told my charting wasn't right.

  • May 17

    Everywhere I've ever worked this would be a huge no no. I myself rarely look at another persons chart and then only if I have something to do with that patient. Working ER I was in other patients charts because we would routinely do meds, or casts etc. In the ICU it is more rare.
    I actually live with the fear of being in trouble for doing this, but do look if it's appropriate for me to do.
    I have accidentally looked at ER pt charts while in the ICU because I thought I was getting the pt and then I don't
    You will not get into trouble for someone else being in your chart, that is all on them. As far as reporting it etc, maybe I would tell them to stay out, but not report because you will be leaving soon anyway and you won't be able to change the culture of a unit during your 3 month stay. I used to do travel nursing and the charge nurses and other nurses were often in my charts to make sure I was charting per their norm. Did I like it, no, but I really didn't care because I chart pretty good. Have never been told my charting wasn't right.

  • May 17

    Lots of ICUs and ERs don't like new grads. That is, the nurses don't want new grads in the unit. I wonder if this is what is going on. I worked in one ICU where we took and loved new grads, in the other one sadly, a new grad would have been bullied off the unit. I'm not like that but I've seen it several times.
    And in my opinion, if the other nurse was in the room with the pt then it is her problem, not yours.

  • May 17

    Everywhere I've ever worked this would be a huge no no. I myself rarely look at another persons chart and then only if I have something to do with that patient. Working ER I was in other patients charts because we would routinely do meds, or casts etc. In the ICU it is more rare.
    I actually live with the fear of being in trouble for doing this, but do look if it's appropriate for me to do.
    I have accidentally looked at ER pt charts while in the ICU because I thought I was getting the pt and then I don't
    You will not get into trouble for someone else being in your chart, that is all on them. As far as reporting it etc, maybe I would tell them to stay out, but not report because you will be leaving soon anyway and you won't be able to change the culture of a unit during your 3 month stay. I used to do travel nursing and the charge nurses and other nurses were often in my charts to make sure I was charting per their norm. Did I like it, no, but I really didn't care because I chart pretty good. Have never been told my charting wasn't right.

  • May 17

    Lots of ICUs and ERs don't like new grads. That is, the nurses don't want new grads in the unit. I wonder if this is what is going on. I worked in one ICU where we took and loved new grads, in the other one sadly, a new grad would have been bullied off the unit. I'm not like that but I've seen it several times.
    And in my opinion, if the other nurse was in the room with the pt then it is her problem, not yours.

  • May 17

    Everywhere I've ever worked this would be a huge no no. I myself rarely look at another persons chart and then only if I have something to do with that patient. Working ER I was in other patients charts because we would routinely do meds, or casts etc. In the ICU it is more rare.
    I actually live with the fear of being in trouble for doing this, but do look if it's appropriate for me to do.
    I have accidentally looked at ER pt charts while in the ICU because I thought I was getting the pt and then I don't
    You will not get into trouble for someone else being in your chart, that is all on them. As far as reporting it etc, maybe I would tell them to stay out, but not report because you will be leaving soon anyway and you won't be able to change the culture of a unit during your 3 month stay. I used to do travel nursing and the charge nurses and other nurses were often in my charts to make sure I was charting per their norm. Did I like it, no, but I really didn't care because I chart pretty good. Have never been told my charting wasn't right.

  • May 14

    I work ED and ICU. In the ED you are expected to get your pt out and to the next bed ASAP, usually within 30 minutes. There is always a charge nurse asking why you haven't gotten the pt to the floor yet. So while there might be a tiny bit of sandbagging done by some doctors/nurses it isn't as much as you think. Patients come and go throughout the shift and of course some of that happens at shift change. It sucks and we all hate it, but it is, what it is. Admission and discharge nurses are a great idea, but most places won't pay to have them.

  • May 14

    Commuter-I so respect you. I do ER and ICU and before that I did physical therapy. I did go for the hospital job. But, you are right, it is not the only avenue. You touched on every hot spot of why most nurses hate the hospital. And most of us that work there are simply hostages to the higher pay.

    It is refreshing to have someone, after careful review, decide to take the non-traditional route. You are absolutely right, nurses are needed all over. Not just in hospitals. The patients/clients you are going to be working with are very lucky to be getting you. Best of wishes to you in your new adventure.

  • May 10

    I work ED and ICU. In the ED you are expected to get your pt out and to the next bed ASAP, usually within 30 minutes. There is always a charge nurse asking why you haven't gotten the pt to the floor yet. So while there might be a tiny bit of sandbagging done by some doctors/nurses it isn't as much as you think. Patients come and go throughout the shift and of course some of that happens at shift change. It sucks and we all hate it, but it is, what it is. Admission and discharge nurses are a great idea, but most places won't pay to have them.

  • Apr 15

    My husband got really mad at me once too
    him: "You've been on that damn website for 3 days and haven't taken a bath or changed your clothes. It's me or them"
    me: Ok, I'll go bath
    me after three days without AN: I've decided that I can't live without AN so bye

    That was about 7 years ago. This April we will be celebrating 40 years of marriage.
    It is really addicting

  • Apr 12

    I didn't even start nursing school till I was 45. Went to ICU age 55.

  • Apr 10

    I didn't even start nursing school till I was 45. Went to ICU age 55.

  • Apr 9

    Taking care of psyche patients in the ED is very hard. Staff isn't trained for these patients. We do make them strip naked and wear only a gown. Room has everything taken out of it. They may wait hours and hours for someone from mental health to come talk to them.
    I always tell them I'm the medical nurse and we are going to do some medical tests first to make sure there isn't something medical wrong to be causing the problem. Then after the medical clearance a mental health professional will come to help them. This somehow made it feel better for me taking care of them.
    If they want to talk to me about whats going on I will listen. But I always tell them they really need to talk to a mental health professional to get the best care.
    I work part time on a locked psyche unit now and have learned a little. Sadly EDs are not set up in any way that's healthy for these patients.

  • Apr 7

    Not bad for a beginner. Usually you want to leave out stuff like who the pt is and the dx as that is already noted in chart. also you can go through and slash out most of the time you used pt as we know who you are talking about. for example just put
    refused miconazole at 2100, awake, lying in bed, watching tv. you don't need to say "when I left room" you could say "lying in bed, watching tv with no needs at 2200"
    you will learn to use fewer and fewer words as time goes by.
    we all do


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