Content That pco8 Likes

Content That pco8 Likes

pco8 1,658 Views

Joined Sep 13, '12. Posts: 38 (29% Liked) Likes: 15

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  • Mar 24 '15

    Quote from Gooselady
    I loathe how litigious this society is too...
    A skilled attorney once opined, "when the economy gets tough, the lawyers get going." He referred to those who sue for stuff without any legal basis. Keeping in mind there are always two sides to every story (and case)... and often three or more...

  • Mar 4 '15

    I agree with you in a way that I think that anyone in a health profession should set a good example and show the patients the way to health. I feel that nurses...doctors...etc all should keep their health up to date and try to be in shape. Being in shape helps stress, helps physical fatigue, helps your body handle the crazy hours, we need good foods and nutrition to help our minds be on top and be focused. If people are offered that's because it can be hurtful but I feel this subject would of hurt feelings no matter how it was worded. Best thing you can do in my opinion is be fit and healthy and inspiring as you can, and help your coworkers out as best you can and hopefully it helps people go from there...maybe bring in homemade protein bars to give staff a little healthy pick me up so they can feel the difference of energy from good nutrition vs donuts, pizza, high sugar snacks etc.... I don't feel you were being super judgmental just wondering why so many people who want to work in health aren't necessarily healthy. Well from what I have learned is people who have never been on top of their physical and nutritional health, simply do not understand and just feel attacked.

  • Mar 4 '15

    Hello! So while I was in nursing school, I noticed a lot of nurses were unhealthy and overweight. Yes, we have little or no time to take breaks and eat, yes, we are constantly on our feet and get too tired to go to the gym, and, yes, we neglect our own health to take care of others. But, we need to be healthy and fit in order to take care of those in need. There are no excuses. That is why I think ALL nurses should practice what they preach!

    I am a new RN. I have experienced the nurse life throughout nursing school, and will continue the nurse life for many more years to come. Before I decided to become a nurse, I worked in a gym since I was 15 (I am 23, almost 24 now). I started off as unhealthy, overweight, and unmotivated. When my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer and DM2 back in 2010, our whole lives changed. Our diets and exercise habits completely did a 180. I realized that this unhealthy lifestyle we were living, was doing damage to us. From that moment on, I decided to get motivated, become healthy, and put my father on the right track to becoming healthy as well (which, now, he is free of cancer and maintaining his DM2 via diet and no meds). I asked for help from a trainer at my gym (who has now been my boyfriend for over 2 years), who got me into shape, have a clean diet, and not only lose weight, but also maintain the weight loss. Diet and exercise is a lifestyle.

    I am currently the healthiest I have ever been in my life. I workout everyday for at least 1 hour, including cardio and weights. On my 12 hour clinical days, I skipped the gym because that is already a workout in itself….and let’s face it, by the time we get home, we get ready for bed and sleep. I made sure to have a healthy, consistent diet on my shifts. I currently still work part-time at my gym, while applying for hospital positions. The manger and owner of the gym offered me positions as a personal trainer. I am working on getting my personal training certificate. I don’t want to just be that “typical” nurse. I want to be that FIT nurse, who works hard, trains hard, and is a positive example to patients.

    I think that ALL nurses and those in the healthcare field should practice what they preach. How can we tell patients to take their BP meds and Cholesterol meds, if we don't? How can we tell them to exercise every day, if we don't? What type of example are we to them?

    What do you guys think?

  • Mar 3 '15

    I had the same viewpoint. She should have refused to take the assignment due to lack of proper equipment and it could have put her life in danger. That is like saying management told me to put a coffee filter over my mouth to use as a TB mask and I agreed to do so, I have to accept SOME responsibility if I catch TB because I knew it wasn't right and I still went through with it. There should be some self responsibility for this situation.

  • Mar 3 '15

    I believe Mr. Duncan did lie to the staff at PHD, but I also believe he did so because he was terrified that he would be turned away from the hospital if he admitted he had exposure to ebola. Apparently, he had seen that happen with his own eyes in Liberia. I believe he was scared to death and was hoping the staff at PHD would just figure it out based on his symptoms.

    I'm not saying it was right, but I understand it.

  • Mar 3 '15
  • Mar 3 '15

    Quote from imintrouble
    If I accept an assignment I'm not qualified for, and the outcome is bad, what should happen?
    If the hospital doesn't have the equipment to treat my patient, and I know the care is inadequate, what should happen to me?

    There are consequences to nurses who knowingly engage in treatment that is inadequate for their patient.
    Nina Pham continued to care for this patient knowing the protection was inadequate. She knew she was at risk and she proceeded anyway. She's either a better person than me, or a dumber nurse than me. Or both.

    I don't care that she's suing her employer, though I believe she knew full well the danger she placed herself in.
    She has bills to pay. She might be sued. There might be long term issues with the experimental drugs she took.
    She volunteered to step into the room with the most dangerous disease in the world. She knew her iso equipment was inadequate. Her defense is that she didn't, but I'm crediting her with at least being as smart as me.
    Anyway, she's sued and the hospital will settle. I wonder if that will start a trend?
    The standard person didn't know anything about Ebola. I can't imagine walking into work and taking care of an Ebola patient and I know about it because I read books like The Hot Zone that discussed the need for hazmat suits with respirators. We are not a third world country that we should be expected to settle for a plastic gown and mask when any biocontainment lab in the USA wears the full protective gear. Those nurses were thrown under the bus first by the CDC and then by the hospital!

    Someone was going to have to take care of the Ebola patient and if she volunteered that doesn't mean she isn't entitled to be safe and doesn't have the right to sue! Corporations only respond to the pocket book. Look at the Ford Pinto explosions the management decided it was cheaper to let people die rather than fix the defect in the first place. Same BS with GM and the ignition problems that left many dead and injured! Hopefully this lawsuit will put all hospitals on notice that it is their responsibility to protect their workers!

  • Mar 3 '15

    This is probably not the point, but our whole legal system, litigious society, "I'm going to sue you" mentality, makes me grind my teeth. It is purely anecdotal but I hear horror stories of lawyers suing, winning, then 80% of the settlement goes to the lawyer 20% goes to the claimant.

    I had a friend who was treated for several months at a local hospital and completely misdiagnosed. When someone finally figured out what was causing the problem it was like DUH! (Really a BIG DUH!)

    She asked the CEO, director, medical attending, heads of various departments, etc., to meet with her. She specifically said she had no desire to sue anybody. She wanted them to remember her, what the "error" was, and make sure this did not happen to anybody else.

    Sorry but my gut response when people sue is they (or a lawyer) see dollar signs. They are not trying to fix a problem.

  • Mar 3 '15

    I don't blame Nina for filing suit. Some of her language sounds like PI lawyer speak, though. It sounds to me like a lawyer contacted her, and over time, whispered in her ear long enough to bring her to this point. I used to work for a PI lawyer and that's what they often do. They will groom a person to become angry enough to file.

    One thing that bothers me about this is the privacy issue. In her interview with the Dallas newspaper, she says she was in and out and doesn't remember a lot. She says she begged the hospital not to release her name, but they did. Of course that's a HIPAA violation, no doubt. HOWEVER, I live in Dallas, and I remember distinctly that she was first identified by her family. They are the ones who supplied the first photo of her with her dog and stated what a dedicated nurse she was.

    I will be very interested to see the court records and evidence that comes out with regard to HIPAA violations once the lawsuit is filed and answered in court.

    At the time all this happened, I said that THR was going to need to plan to pull out their wallet and do right by the infected nurses, and I believe that is exactly what will end up happening.

  • Mar 3 '15

    If I accept an assignment I'm not qualified for, and the outcome is bad, what should happen?
    If the hospital doesn't have the equipment to treat my patient, and I know the care is inadequate, what should happen to me?

    There are consequences to nurses who knowingly engage in treatment that is inadequate for their patient.
    Nina Pham continued to care for this patient knowing the protection was inadequate. She knew she was at risk and she proceeded anyway. She's either a better person than me, or a dumber nurse than me. Or both.

    I don't care that she's suing her employer, though I believe she knew full well the danger she placed herself in.
    She has bills to pay. She might be sued. There might be long term issues with the experimental drugs she took.
    She volunteered to step into the room with the most dangerous disease in the world. She knew her iso equipment was inadequate. Her defense is that she didn't, but I'm crediting her with at least being as smart as me.
    Anyway, she's sued and the hospital will settle. I wonder if that will start a trend?

  • Nov 14 '12

    Be organized. Get a day planner, post-it notes, whatever. Just be organized.

    Know that there will be cliques. Apparently, high school antics is not over.

    Do not tell other people your grades. Drama will ensue.

    Study groups/study buddies are essential!

    Have faith that you will pass.

    Congratulations on making it in to nursing school!



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