Latest Likes For AngelRN27

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AngelRN27 1,313 Views

Joined Aug 11, '12. Posts: 143 (29% Liked) Likes: 66

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  • Apr 27

    Quote from Nalon1 RN/EMT-P
    If you have issues with the tap water, your facility needs to fix that. The gut is not sterile, no need to use sterile water IMO.
    I could maybe see it in a neutropenic patient, maybe.
    ^^^ This. The gut is not sterile, so I'm not sure how effective using sterile water for NG/OG tubes would be. Did those of you who use this method at your hospitals have some sort of evidence-based back up for this practice? It's uncommon for hospitals to install policies without some sort of foundation outside of either research, practice norms, or some sort of association recommendation (such as the CDC, for example).

  • Feb 29

    My facility does not require us to contact the MD about refused meds until it has occured for the same med x3 as another poster mentioned. If this was the protocol at my facility, I would be calling the doc at least once a day! One incident of refusing meds shouldn't be reason to call a doc (depending on the med, of course). Also, not every "refusal" is legitimate. You have to know your residents... some residents are just confused or need to feel some sense of control in order to reduce anxiety. There are several residents at my facility that will always refuse meds if given at a certain time (i.e. before dinner) but will gladly take them if offered again right after their meal... it all depends...

  • Feb 29

    At my facility we are allowed to give meds in the dining room is they are PO. Nothing invasive can done though, so no sub-q's, IM's, finger sticks, or even BP's allowed.

    I do all my diabetics first and rarely miss any of them before they are moved to the dining room. If they are, I wheel them back to their room after already having their meds ready, do anything I have to do such as a finger stick or BP, then give meds and return to dining room... I haven't really had any issues thus far...

  • Feb 15

    My facility does not require us to contact the MD about refused meds until it has occured for the same med x3 as another poster mentioned. If this was the protocol at my facility, I would be calling the doc at least once a day! One incident of refusing meds shouldn't be reason to call a doc (depending on the med, of course). Also, not every "refusal" is legitimate. You have to know your residents... some residents are just confused or need to feel some sense of control in order to reduce anxiety. There are several residents at my facility that will always refuse meds if given at a certain time (i.e. before dinner) but will gladly take them if offered again right after their meal... it all depends...

  • Dec 3 '15

    In response to PHAINT:

    Not to sound condescending, but are you sure everyone understood your co-worker's sister correctly? I graduated with my RN, ASN July 2012 and 4 or 5 of my classmates got hired at Jackson for $24 plus differentials... I have never heard of a nursing job in S Florida (I live in Miami) pay less than $22. The CNAs around here make about $13-$15... There has to be a miscommunication somewhere; perhaps she didn't take an RN position, but something like a PCT or ER Tech?

  • Aug 28 '15

    I worked in LTC/SNF as a new grad for a year, then was readily hired at a small LTAC Hospital. Completely different settings. This is basically a step-down ICU with high ratios. I realize that LTC does have a certain "reputation" but I also think an interviewer can get an idea of whether or not you know what you're doing. Sell yourself.



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